78

The title originates from the science fiction novella Blade Runner (a movie) by William S. Burroughs. According to Wikipedia: The term "blade runner" referred to a smuggler of medical supplies, e.g. scalpels. The history behind choosing the name is detailed in Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner by Paul M. Sammon: Fancher found a cinema treatment ...


53

I feel there are two reasons Roy saved Deckard. The first is that, during his final moments, Roy utters his awesome "Tears in the Rain" soliloquy, which extols the wonders of life, and despite its complexity, how utterly fleeting and transitory life is: I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I ...


42

According to David Dryer (the film's Effects Supervisor), the pill she is swallowing is in fact a birth control pill: Scott's intentions with this imagery, as related by special effects supervisor, David Dryer, are revealing; "What happened... was that Ridley and I had a meeting where he told me,'I want a bunch of phony oriental commercials where ...


34

If you look at the demographics when the movie was made, the immigrant Chinese population was growing very quickly. It was quite reasonable to believe that they would attain a significant enough population to have their own sections of town (even large ones) where Chinese culture was not subsumed by American culture, and where Chinese was freely spoken. In ...


34

The reasons Roy Batty saved Deckard are already covered in another question. As to why he murders Tyrell and Sebastian, it's not explicit, but I think it's possible to infer from context. Batty, as has been mentioned in other answers, is a combat model. His brain is in some sense hard wired to solve problems by killing. However, we know that he can break ...


33

Both - but only unknowingly Luv and other mishaps Joi is a known Wallace Corp. product, Luv even mentions I hope the product is to your satisfaction when Joi's ringtone alerts K in the Wallace Corp. headquarters. It is evident also, that Luv was using Joi's trackers to keep tabs on K and the progress of his mission. However, there's no evidence that ...


32

Although it's not mentioned in the film itself, there is apparently another source, although the canonicity is dubious (as the book also contradicts aspects of the movie) and subject to change if they ever did a movie sequel. In the licensed novel sequel, Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human, there is an explanation that it's an Anglicization of a foreign term ...


30

Evidence in the film? Some, but not much. All bad. Roy is described as a Combat model. Optimum self-sufficiency. ("Colonization Defence"). It seems likely that his role was either to put down mutinies amongst the colonists, or to protect the colonists against uprisings by the replicants. Either way it's not a bed of roses up there if they need super-...


28

I always interpreted that scene as Roy finally coming to grips with his own mortality and, in his final moments, accepting it instead of fighting against it. Throughout the movie, Roy and the other renegade replicants were trying to find a way to avoid their demise. They ultimately weren't able to. As Roy and Deckard fought at the end of the movie, Roy's ...


25

Deckard can't see it; it's non-diegetic, intended for the film audience, but not for the film's characters. Given that we only ever see the 'glowing eyes' effect when the in-universe characters have not acknowledged it, it tells us that this must be a feature that is not apparent to them. Additionally, according to Paul Sammon: Ridley Scott maintains ...


23

"Why was Philip K Dick so distressed..." Easy answer; he wasn't. If you read Mike Scott's excellent answer, you will see that, although he never saw the completed version, what he did see impressed him significantly enough that he sent a glowingly complimentary letter to the production company, thanking them for their contribution to the field of SciFi, ...


22

There's a sequence to them. In Bryant's office, Gaff made a chicken, which means that he thinks Deckard's refusing to come back to blade running because of cowardace. Later, while searching Leon's apartment, Gaff makes a matchstick man. A quick Google showed that Gaff gave the matchstick man an erection, saying he knows Deckard is attracted to Rachael. ...


20

Until the events of the film, the replicant Rachel believed herself to be human: DECKARD: She doesn't know. TYRELL: She's beginning to suspect, I think. DECKARD: Suspect? How can it not know what it is? That would include having a normal pain response. If she could put her hand into a pot of boiling water and not react, it would be a rather ...


20

At the latest, the Blade Runner future had split off by 1982. During Deckerd's video-phone conversation in the bar with Rachel, you can see the Bell Telephone logo on the machine he uses. In real life, on January 8, 1982, Bell System agreed to make itself defunct as a result of anti-monopoly actions by the U.S. federal government against its parent company,...


19

There are several answers, including Ridley Scott thinking big neon kanji (or possibly hànzì, the Chinese ideograms) characters are cool. In fact, I would guess that's a primary reason. It's been a good long time since I read Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep, but I'm very sure that demographic isn't part of PKD's novel. What I do remember is that, by ...


19

When Ana tells her backstory, it seems that her genetic disorder did not blossom until she was 8 years old. Her parents made plans to move off-world, but Ana was not able to come with them because of her disorder. From the way she tells this story, it doesn't seem that the plan all along was to leave Ana behind; rather, her parents planned to bring her with ...


19

Wallace killed the Replicant because she was a failure. It's all to do with the context; Niander Wallace was talking about reproductive Replicants and this new one was a failure, so he simply 'retired' her. He's got a 'god complex'. The birthing room img src It looks like this birthing room within his quarters was a bit out of the ordinary, why would he ...


18

Yes there is a conflict between Bryant and Tyrell's statements, but lets consider the two situations: Bryant is talking to Deckard: a man who used to report to him and who he is in a position to force to do things; indeed he also voices the rather unsavory opinion that there are "cops" and "little people". He has no particular need to lie and his character ...


17

Philip K. Dick only saw twenty minutes of the film before his death. According to Dick's close friend and confidante Maer Wilson (who spoke to him daily until his death) Philip Dick never saw the completed film. Philip K. Dick only met Ridley Scott one time – the day Phil was invited to view the special effects months prior to the Blade Runner ...


16

I believe that the owls in Futurama are a subtle nod towards Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. As I understand it, Philip K Dick guessed that the first species to be made extinct due to the destruction of the environment would be the owl. So Futurama took the exact opposite approach and said that owls replaced pigeons/rats as the dominant pest of New New ...


16

The intent of replicants is to be, a human replication, to the point the best replicants don't even know they are one. This would be subverted if replicants could be easily told apart. The 4 year safeguard is to avoid the Replicants to develop human cognition to the point they can't be detected. So what is the point of replicants in the first place? The 4 ...


15

Some good thoughts here, but I will add a simple formulation to the sum. If Tyrell had created nothing more than extremely convincing machines, then it's no great crime to create them to wear out quickly. If he created actual human beings, then it's a terrible crime to create them to live profoundly only to die quickly. The whole question of Blade Runner, ...


14

From the book: Gathering a giant white bath towel about her, Rachael said, "Did you enjoy that?" "Yes." "Would you ever go to bed with an android again?" "If it was a girl. If she resembled you." Rachael said, "Do you know what the lifespan of a humanoid robot such as myself is? I've been in existence two years. How long do you calculate I have?" ...


14

Roy Batty was an artificial genetically-engineered being (as explained in the opening text), and these artificial beings (replicants) had been engineered to have a four year lifespan in order to prevent them from having time to develop too many of their own "emotional responses". He was approaching the end of that life (as were his companions), which is why ...


14

Hmmm. Daryl Hannah - no glowing eyes: Sean Young - no glowing eyes: Rutger Hauer - no glowing eyes: From your source: To achieve this effect, we'd use a two-way mirror — 50 percent transmission, 50 percent reflection — placed in front of the lens at a 45-degree angle. Then we'd project a light into the mirror so that it would be reflected into the ...


14

This will be a tricky one, since it's still very early in the release of the movie and most of us don't have a hold of the scripts. Additionally, this entire plot point is shrouded in mystery. Luckily, I watched it two days ago, so the memory is still fresh. Let's hope it's a real memory. Facts The wooden horse spent enough time in Vegas for it to acquire ...


14

The list that was provided to Deckard was based off "suspicions" as we can see when Bryant tells Deckard: "Dave used the Voigt-Kampff Altered Scale in testing out the individuals he suspected (Keep in mind that he only managed to test 3 androids, 2 which he retired and Polokov who shot him). You realize - you ought to, anyhow - that this test isn't ...


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