15

Actually, at this point, it's looking like a nice bit of foreshadowing to me (have the Discovery writers been taking JMS lessons?). Given that It seems painfully obvious, in hindsight, as to why Lorca would have an interest in a phenomenon indicating access to parallel universes from the network.


14

As we learned in the TNG episode "The Measure of a Man", Picard was court martialed for losing his first ship, the USS Stargazer, but was acquitted. Something similar probably happened to Lorca.


12

We cannot answer this, since we can't even know for sure if Lorca's tribble is intentionally neutered. For all we know, Lorca could own a tribble that's unable to reproduce since birth. Given that tribbles are biological in nature, and biological creatures are generally subjected to the theory of evolution (e.g. the justification for Saru's fast running and ...


10

We don't really know what's 'normal', because since the destruction of the Glenn, Discovery is the only Starfleet vessel with a displacement activated spore hub drive. Other Starfleet vessels don't jump. We do know that Captain Lorca typically orders the helmsman to set a course and engage, indicating that standard procedure on Discovery is that the ...


10

How does he have only one? We don't know for sure cause the show hasn't said (as of 11-7-17). But to pull a quote from TOS. Dr. McCoy: [enters after Kirk gets covered with tribbles] Jim! I think I've got it. All we have to do is quit feeding them. We quit feeding them, they stop breeding! Capt. Kirk: Now he tells me. He either knows enough ...


9

The Discovery is, first and foremost, a science ship. Having an XO who is a former science officer is an obvious decision. Having an XO who is a former science officer and can instinctively sense the presence of danger even before it becomes apparent is an excellent decision.


9

About 380 US Navy ships were sunk in combat during World War II. Only one of their captains, Charles B. McVey III of the USS Indianapolis, was court martialed for losing his ship and convicted - a very controversial action. McVey retained his rank of captain but lost his seniority, and was promoted to rear admiral when he retired in 1949. McVey was ...


8

Good question, I think there are several factors that are significant here that are worth discussing, starting with the two you mentioned in the question. Tyler's feelings for Burnham Of your two suggestions, I agree there's a good possibility Lorca is worried that Tyler's feelings for Burnham might compromise his decision-making abilities aboard the ...


8

For Discovery not taking him, that can be explained by the ship still being classified. The Klingons know the name because they presumably have scans of the ship that's attacked them multiple times, but it wouldn't be surprising if Starfleet made a point of keeping it out of the way to reduce the chances of it being observed closely by potential spies, which ...


7

For the reason stated in your question ...probably So far, we've not been given a direct explanation for why Lorca behaved this way, he could very well have just been behaving as Starfleet regulations require. But going by the events of the previous episode, and what we learn in later episodes (his treatment of Stamets when battling the Ship of the Dead), we ...


6

There's nothing that explicitly states the pilot died: Starfleet EVA suits have been shown to have long endurance, so the few minutes the pilot was in space shouldn't have been a problem. From the point of view of the prisoners, whether she was alive or not wasn't important: what mattered is that she wasn't there, and they were going to die without someone ...


5

Lorca's main motivation, as you say, seems to be to win the war and he believes that he and his ship and crew are key to that (He most definately views it all as his). Presumably he was collecting all this data initially on the chance that it may be useful to the war effort. The point of revealing all of this to Stammets was to increase motivation and ...


5

The Short Trek entitled "The Trouble With Edward", which aired after S2 of Discovery, reveals that prior to genetic tampering by a Starfleet science officer over the course of that episode, Tribbles had a much slower reproductive cycle. So it may just be that during S2 of Discovery, genetically modified tribbles had not yet been created; another possibility ...


4

As others have noted, since Discovery is the only ship with a spore drive it is unlikely there is an official protocol outside of what has been set by Lorca. I don’t believe we saw Lorca in engineering during any other jump, though, and if we were to follow the precedent set by warp drive it is likely the captain typically would just give the order and let ...


4

There is actually no evidence, one way or the other, that the pilot is actually dead or even injured. We can take the scene at face-value, of course; but if we assume that Lorca engineered the entire scenario, then it's altogether possible that the pilot was basically performing a stunt, and is alive and well.


3

Since Hawkeye has requested me to answer I'll write one down. In the Corvan 2 defense sequence of the episode "The But her Knife Cares not for the Lamb's Cry" it's clear that the USS Discovery leaves a cluster of devices behind when it jumps out on its spore drive to destroy the Klingon Birds of Prey. In the sequence USS Discovery jumps in and destroys the ...


3

At the time Lorca makes this statement, his motives are not entirely clear, except in as much as he wants it to be true. He also either does not understand, or does not fully believe, Lieutenant Stamets' previous assertions about the limitations on navigation. The fact that USS Glenn succeeded tells him that Discovery should be able to succeed, and he doesn'...


2

Speaking from a general ship (i.e. not just Star Trek) standard, no. You generally have different duty stations for a reason, and the helmsman is the position in question here. A professional helmsman maintains a steady course, properly executes all rudder orders, and communicates to the officer on the bridge using navigational terms relating to ship's ...


1

Ruled out by events leading up to the season finale. We learn that


1

It is heavily suggested by dialogue, ("You're right. I did choose you."), not to mention the sheer improbability of the coincidence, that Lorca did arrange the entire prison transport incident. If Burnham had turned out to be intractable, he could always have put her back on the shuttle with the rest of the convicts and sent her off to rot in a dilithium ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible