Hot answers tagged

47

The protagonist of Clarke's Imperial Earth (1975) is explicitly a clone. The Duplicated Man (1953) by James Blish and Robert Lowndes revolved around a machine that can duplicate people. The fictional novel "Lords of the Swastika" written by Hitler in The Iron Dream (1972) featured idealized "Aryan" clones led by a clone of the protagonist. Destination Void (...


25

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word clone first entered English as far back as 1903 to describe plants that were duplicated through grafting (or similar). Another early use of the word describes asexually reproduced cells. This sense dates back to at least 1929. The "duplicate person" sense of clone can be found as far back as 1970, in a ...


14

This is probably Robin Cook's Mutation. Victor Frank, and his wife Marsha, are unable to have a second child due to Marsha's infertility. They turn to surrogacy as an alternate method of conception. Victor, an obstetrician-gynaecologist and owner of the biochemical company Chimera Inc., injects the egg implanted in his wife with an agent called Nerve ...


14

Cloning as a scientific process might not have been mature in 1974, but the idea of a Doppelgänger had been around for hundreds of years A doppelgänger (literally "double-goer") is a non-biologically related look-alike or double of a living person, sometimes portrayed as a ghostly or paranormal phenomenon and usually seen as a harbinger of bad luck. Other ...


12

According to The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction one of the first uses of "clone" for people instead of plants (where the usage is much older) was the book The Biological Time-Bomb (1968) by Gordon Rattray Taylor: It is not mere sensationalism to ask whether the members of human clones may feel particularly united, and be able to cooperate better, even if ...


11

The most widespread exposure to science fictional ideas comes though television, radio, comic strips, and comic books, since those are the cheapest to the consumer media and experienced by the largest audiences, often being experience by more persons than any but the most popular movies, to say nothing of being experienced by more people than science fiction ...


9

This might be part of the Replica series by Marilyn Kaye. The one that sounds the most similar is Another Amy. Perfect Amy Candler tries hard to blend in with everyone else, but then she comes face to face with someone who looks just like her--someone who is another Amy. The two girls look identical, and Amy expects them to have identical personalities. ...


6

My dad found it: The Generations Trilogy by Scott Sigler: Alive (2015) I open my eyes to darkness. Total darkness. I hear my own breathing, but nothing else. I lift my head…it thumps against something solid and unmoving. There is a board right in front of my face. No, not a board…a lid. A teenage girl awakens to find herself trapped in a coffin. She ...


3

I found the name of the story! Here is the description of it on Wikipedia: "macs" is a sci-fi short story by Terry Bisson, published in 1999. The story consists entirely of dialogue between several people and an investigator. The people are telling the investigator about clones that were used to satisfy the Victims’ Rights Closure Settlement – wherein ...


3

There's no description of the process by which clones are initiated in the films or any of the canon books, other than that donor DNA (courtesy of Jango Fett for the clone troopers) is required. Interestingly, fresh infusions of DNA are evidently required on an ongoing basis in order to prevent the clones from becoming sluggish and incompetent. Lama Su: ...


2

Actually - physical immortality is explained as being engineered into the shatterlings from the begining: “Ludmilla Marcellin was not going to go to all this trouble and have her clones die of senescence after only two or three circuits. The human race might be content with its current life expectancy, but nothing less than physical immortality would do ...


1

Just to draw some analysis from all of the good answers here, I can see two relevant connotations of cloning that were in the air at the time. First, there was the idea that you could find one ideal source and clone a perfect army. Lucas clearly used that one in the prequels. And second, there was the idea that there might be some kind of mysterious ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible