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218

The assumption in the question is mistaken. As @Mithrandir already linked above, it's a common assumption of adult readers that Hobbes couldn't possibly be real but that's just not how the actual comic works. Watterson intentionally left the entire issue unresolvable, with strips like this where Hobbes should need to be real for Calvin to be in the ...


140

A pretty compelling one is this strip, where Calvin had no opportunity to take the cookies without Susie noticing: I also find it interesting that "real" Hobbes appears in the second pane. Then there's this one, where Calvin would probably have some serious difficulty getting that high up a tree while holding a water balloon on his own, but more ...


118

The death penalty does, indeed, exist within the DC and Marvel comic universes. Typically, however, it is not employed against supervillains. There are many in-universe reasons, but the out-of-universe reasons are twofold: many comics don't involve a lot of death and if they kill off a supervillain they can't use him again (without an elaborate explanation ...


111

I believe you're thinking of this scene: It comes from "Deadpool, Merc With A Mouth #5" In Deadpool's defense, the guy was a member of AIM, generally considered a terrorist organization of evil scientists and engineers. It wasn't like he was a random innocent guy off the street. And, I mean, fine, he's evil... but if he can't have morals, and can't have ...


106

In Fantastic Four Vol 1 #262 (1984), Reed Richards is put on trial by the Shi'ar empire for having saved the life of Galactus several issues previously. The trial is held in a large arena, with representatives from a large number of alien races present. During the trial, Galactus appears as a character witness on behalf of Richards. The artwork when he ...


104

Excalibur #58 (1992) fits the bill, your villain being Alchemy. From ComicVine: Trouble on both sides! With both the Crazy Gang and the trolls that kidnapped Alchemy on the loose, can even the combined strength of Excalibur and the X-Men come out on top? As revealed in the previous issue, Alchemy was in with the trolls who used his mother as leverage ...


102

There is a marvel guide picture for it and shows count of 236, contrary to my own comment With inspiration from reddit, manual eyeballing, and the help of Julian, below is the list of characters seen in the wedding:- Devil Dinosaur Snowbird Moon Boy Shaman Sasquatch Guardian Northstar Aurora Vindicator Marrina Pixie Starfox The White Tiger Union Jack ...


99

Top row (L to R) The Rocketeer Iron Man Tron Red Ranger (from Mighty Morphin Power Rangers) Center Row (L to R) Judge Dredd Darth Vader (from the Star Wars franchise) The Witch King of Angmar (from The Lord of the Rings films) Boba Fett (from the Star Wars franchise) Maximus Decimus Meridius (from the film Gladiator) Bottom Row (L to R) ...


91

Well, she's not alien, but Squirrel Girl's sidekick Tippy-Toe sees Galactus as a giant squirrel in The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #4:


84

No. Calvin's parents mostly play along with his belief Hobbes is real. But when Susie directly points out that Hobbes is a stuffed toy, Calvin simply ignores her: In the very last panel of the comic, we see Calvin as convinced as ever that Hobbes is a real tiger:


83

I want to say the Wasp, because this shirt seems Avengers-themed and the Wasp was a founding member of the Avengers. For what it's worth, this Wasp wallet has almost the same logo, and is apparently officially licensed: This product is handcrafted in the USA by Buckle-Down, Inc. and is Officially Licensed by Marvel Comics.


82

The answer would depend on which villain, and which universe you're speaking about. We are told that Bruce Wayne chose the image of a bat to "strike fear into the heart of his enemies". In fact, everything about his physical appearance is used to create a false image that he is more than just a man. Particularly in the movie incarnations, his body ...


77

Superman has indeed said "Ouch!", on the cover of Superman 106. Lex Luthor creates an alloy that picks up energy Superman uses in his super-feats and transmits it to a suit of electronic armor he has invented. The suit gives Luthor all of Superman’s powers, but Superman defeats him by exposing himself to Kryptonite, which also transmits weakness ...


77

It was all Charles Moulton (pen name of psychologist William Moulton Marston). Here's a brief article touching on his ideas in that regard. A couple of quotes: Through his psychological research, Marston had come to the conclusion that women were naturally superior to men, both morally and in terms of skill. Further, he believed that women’s tendency toward ...


75

Yes. This was confirmed in the final Far Side comic: The universe is apparently Gary Larson's brain. This is also heavily implied by the 'Tales From The Far Side' TV shorts. As far as the quote mentioned in the other answer, I procured a copy of 'Prehistory' and can confirm it doesn't exist.


69

No. In The Prehistory of The Far Side, Larson mentions the trickiness of writing a comic in which there is never any "after.". There can be no running plot line, almost never even multiple panels to show progression in time. Each comic, he points out, has to be a universe all on its own.


68

Simple: because that was a pretty lucky accident that probably is too risky to attempt to replicate. Let me elaborate: There are two comics that you should consider: How Obelix Fell into the Magic Potion When He Was a Little Boy Asterix and Obelix All at Sea The first one is a retelling that explains HOW Obelix felt in the cauldron when he was about 6. ...


67

Superman can't normally get drunk when he has his powers. Under the effects of a Yellow or Blue star, Kryptonians don't have to eat or drink anything and they can't get drunk. I'm not even sure they have to sleep. Therefore, under most circumstances, he, along with any other Kryptonian, such as Supergirl, cannot get drunk. However, were you to take away his ...


67

I remember that one! Space Family Robinson! Here you go:


64

Found it (the first one, that is): "Shells" by François Schuiten and Luc Schuiten. Appeared in Heavy Metal Magazine #197703. Links are NSFW.


63

Wolverine remembered due to a loophole. Scarlet Witch's altering of the world wasn't solely to create a world where mutants rule, but also, the Scarlet Witch gave many of the X-Men and New Avengers their "heart's desire" (perhaps to keep them content enough to not try to undo things, similar to what was done in a recent Agents of SHIELD storyline on TV). ...


60

Yes, on at least three occasions. Know what happens when a character who is most known for only saying "I am Groot" gets Venomized? Well, Guardians of the Galaxy #21 (2014) has your answer. He says "I am Venom". Another time was in Venom: Along came a Spider #1 (1996). Eddie Brock disguises himself as detective Clark from the NYPD (using the Symbiote), ...


55

The Titans of the Marvel Universe, as orginally conceived by Jim Starlin, are of very different power levels, but few (if any) are as powerful as Thanos. Starlin conceived the Titans as an offshoot branch of the Greek Gods, with Thanos' father Mentor being the brother of Zeus. Thanos' brother Eros, who became an Avenger by the name Starfox, is portrayed as ...


55

Dean Cain, who played Superman in the 90's TV show Lois and Clark, is actually 1/4 Japanese, and does identify as Asian American. However, by looks, I could see the audience not necessarily reading the character to be Asian American, and of course, Superman himself being an alien from Krypton, calling the character to be of any particular ethnicity is kind ...


52

I can think of three immediate examples: Super-Skrull, a Skrull warrior, was given (through some means available to Skrulls) the combined powers of the Fantastic Four. Silver Surfer, from Zenn-La, was given the Power Cosmic by Galactus (and by implication every non-human Herald). Beta Ray Bill, a Korbinite, was given the Power of Thor.


50

You're most likely describing this scene from Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?. Alfred isn't really The Joker, he's merely pretending to be him.


50

Based on the description in the TV Tropes section "And I Must Scream", I believe this to be "The Death Clock", written by Mark Evanier & Robert Kanigher and drawn by Sonny Trinidad, originally published in House of Mystery #214 (Fantomen nr 8/1994). A stand-alone comic in the magazine Fantomen featured a young man who comes into possession of a ...


49

In Superman: American Alien #3, Clark Kent is mistaken for Bruce Wayne by an assassin (Deathstroke). Deathstroke slips him a neurotoxin in a glass of champagne that would kill a human, but just makes Clark act for all the world like he's drunk. While this isn't intoxication by alcohol, it's amusingly close.


48

Hugo Hercules was featured in a comic that ran for five months between 1902 and 1903. While specifically described as having super strength, in one comic he was able to pull a line of train cars at the same speed as a train. From Wikipedia A good-natured man endowed with superhuman strength, the character of Hugo wandered about town, helping people ...


48

This is the comic you're referring to; Excalibur Vol 1 #58. Wolverine has his claws turned (temporarily) into rubber by Alchemy at the urging of a troll.


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