Hot answers tagged

86

Found at vampilore.co.uk (emphasis mine): Emanuel Maris speaks out … "Well, suppose I set the story straight(er), as to my reasons for writing the Heidi poem in the Creation '74 (Jan) program I edited and published for Malin/ Berman's convention. "I always harboured a little bit of attitude against entrants for a Costume Parade Prize who didn't ...


82

Assuming you always count the swimsuit-style bottom as "panties", then, yes, on at least one cover (Wonder Woman #63 from 1992), Wonder Woman has not only had more than 25 stars, she's has more than 25 stars visible from the FRONT.


61

The Command Tunics in TOS Were Actually Green The costume designer for TOS was Bill Theiss: William Ware Theiss - the designer of all the Starfleet uniforms and alien costumes seen in the 79 episodes of The Original Series. His elegant, daring and revealing wardrobe creations for the female guest stars on the series is one of the most memorable and ...


60

From the New Orlean Comic Con in January 2011 (see below video) Host: The real answer is that costume designer John Mollo decided to put him in the same clothes didn't mean anything as they [Harrison Ford and Billy Dee Williams] were actually sized differently. The fan answer or the universe answer is it's actually part of the Corellien Core[/Corps?] ...


50

According to the visual dictionary, those 'pens' are actually code cylinders. I'd assume by that they mean it's the authorization codes for that particular officer. (Kind of like a badge/PIN/password combo that you see at secure facilities.)


47

Lynda Carter's costume from the 1970s Wonder Woman/The New Adventures of Wonder Woman had at least that many stars:


42

The primary reason writers still use the witch's hat in their literature is because the pointy hat is a form of writer's shorthand, a means to indicate to the reader we are seeing a witch, a being of power, of dark pacts, potentially dangerous, to be respected and feared. Yes, it is the very definition of stereotyping, but it works. This image of the witch ...


42

Pockets and Pouches There's no evidence that Starfleet uniforms in TNG have pockets. Generally speaking, handheld equipment for away missions (phasers, tricorders) was stowed in fitted pouches. The below screenshot (from the episode "Timescape", shows them from a bunch of angles: It's a little hard to see (likely by design), but the pouches and uniform ...


35

A few years ago, considerable research was done into Khan, the development of his character, and the making of "Space Seed" by sociologists Maria Jose and John Tenuto, leading to a six-part interview with them by the official Star Trek web site. From The Evolution of "Space Seed", Part 5, we have the following notes regarding the ...


34

This company Has a nearly identical pattern, with a gold background, orange dragons and darker coloured vines. It looks like a fairly common pattern used in cheap imported oriental fabric. "Chinese Traditional Dragons Pattern Design Beige Brocade Fabric Asian Silk Fabric Chinese Fabric Material"


31

Imperial code cylinders These indicate the rank and other identifying information of Imperial officers: Tarkin squinted at the hologram that appeared alongside the holopresence of the facility administrator. Dressed in an Imperial uniform, the man was tall and lean, with thick red hair and a raised scar on his left cheek that ran from the corner of a full ...


30

I think it's called a Sherwani, a "long coat-like garment worn in South Asia, very similar to an Achkan or Polish żupan." Here's an image from the link above:


30

She dyes it The canon novel Leia, Princess of Alderaan shows teenage Holdo's frequent dying and eccentric wardrobe choices: Amilyn Holdo wafted along, the same slightly glazed expression on her face. Her hair had been dyed pale blue with orange tips. 'Apparently Holdo goes her own way'....which was a good reminder that it shouldn't matter to Leia what this ...


30

It simply appears the be a standard design feature for spacefaring helmets. Note that the same ridges (both over the ears and across the midline) appear on the helmet that Obi-Wan gives to Luke during Luke's Force training session on the Millennium Falcon, even though that helmet is probably of neither Imperial or Rebel vintage. Out of universe, the ...


28

This is not a duty uniform. This is a captain's casual / off-duty tunic. Notice in your bottom-most screenshot, that the tunic is split down the center with one side overlapping the other, as in a cardigan. Here is a better screenshot from a different episode: Compare this to Picard's captain's jacket (worn on occasion in TNG Seasons 5-7):


26

Possibly, but most likely not In universe There isn't much exact information about what the suit is comprised of. This may be due to intentional vagueness from the writers. What we know for sure is that it contains alloys and carbon nanotube based allows: ... After Daredevil's first meeting with Punisher, Potter increased the durability of the suit by ...


22

Aaah, the much awaited question about Wonder Woman! DCAU Certainly less: Justice League Animated Series: 6 Going by symmetry, the count should be 6 or at max 7. Wonder Woman (2009 film): 16-17 6 on front side, 10 on the back side Justice League Doom : 10 Justice League War : 2 Conclusion: less than 25. Comics: it actually varies from ...


21

It is some kind of Mino (蓑), a traditional Japanese garment, a raincoat made out of straw. a picture of Warōzu 草鞋, a straw boots too.


20

The swastika is a symbol that long pre-dates the Nazis. Hindus, Buddists, and Jains have used the symbol long before World War II, and will likely continue to use it long after. Note also the direction of the swastika (facing the left) is indicative of its Hindu origins, and not the right-ward facing Hakenkreuz of the Nazis. The fact that it arose in ...


19

From Batman Issue 203 (as far as I can tell):


19

Unknown, but maybe because it was unusual As indicated in the comment by Richard, the celery idea was due to the producer, John Nathan-Turner, who did not offer an explanation for it. The celery was John’s idea. He just came to me one day and said ‘I think the new Doctor should wear a stick of celery on his lapel’, and so that was it. Funny, really,...


19

Out of universe, I believe the other answer has it covered. But in universe, perhaps this can explain it: That's a Clone ARC 170 pilot, seen in Revenge of the Sith. Better pictures out there would reveal that their helmets look like a cross between the Rebel pilot helmet and a TIE Fighter helmet (and out of universe, was mentioned to be designed as such), ...


18

They're called "Code Cylinders" or sometimes "Rank Cylinders". They're essentially small encryption devices, used to grant access to secure areas and files. They're also used as markers of rank, especially by high-ranking officers, as carrying more cylinders indicated that one had access to more secure data and areas than someone with fewer. They're not ...


16

Most likely he uses Spirit gum. Spirit gum is a common theatrical adhesive used to affix facial prosthetics. Alfred Pennyworth being a classically trained actor would be very familiar with Spirit gum, and would no doubt have suggested it's use in securing Robin's domino mask. To loosen Spirit gum you need only apply any acetone based remover, such as ...


16

So far the best answer I can find. JOHN De LANCIE (Q): I actually think the judge’s costume was pulled off another show. They did that kind of thing all the time, especially early on. Studios have a bazillion costumes in stock and they’re just redone to fit whatever’s needed on the next show or movie. So I believe that judge’s costume was a ...


14

The answer is "both." It just depends on what continuity you're talking about. Begun by Batman For example, in the Nolan movies, they make it quite clear that Batman's presence is what caused the "escalation" of the villains. Jim Gordon: What about escalation? Batman: Escalation? Jim Gordon: We start carrying semi-automatics, they buy ...


14

Image cloning and compositing. You can see a bunch of duplicated people, and that's just at a quick look.


13

According to the traveling Smithsonian Exhibit, Chewbacca's costume was made of yak hair and mohair. Presumably, the other wookiee suits were as well. The exhibit features screen-used costumes and props from all six movies, including one of the original Chewbacca costumes. This article about the exhibit mentions the costume's materials specifically. ...


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