302

It's helpful to consider in context of the time. Rationings were in effect in WWII England, and Turkish Delights were a particular delicacy that was popular at the time and hard to come by. Also consider that food in general was less sugar packed than many of the options we have today, so many foods at the time that we might consider "disappointing"...


58

At the very beginning of Narnia (in The Magician's Nephew), King Frank and Queen Helen (the cabby and his wife) were set to be the first King and Queen in Narnia. It also appears that some of their descendants were the first kings and queens in Archenland: ... you and your children and grandchildren shall be blessed, and some will be Kings of Narnia, and ...


55

Yes, but not exclusively There's a similar question over on Literature.SE asking "Was C. S. Lewis condemning nuclear weapons in The Magician's Nephew?" that likely has the answer you're looking for. These are different sites, both questions are relevant to their own sites, and the question itself is technically different ("referring" vs "condemning"). ...


47

To add on to what NKCampbell said, consider this from CS Lewis' Mere Christianity (emphasis mine) An ordinary simple Christian kneels down to say his prayers. He is trying to get into touch with God. But if he is a Christian he knows that what is prompting him to pray is also God: God, so to speak, inside him. But he also knows that all his real knowledge ...


45

Each world (Narnia, Charn, our own world, and so on) has an associated "realm beyond", where people go when they die. Narnia's version is called Aslan's country, the version associated to our own world is called Heaven, and so on. For each world, this appears very much like a better and more wonderful version of the land of the living. They call Aslan's ...


44

This discussion board thread appears to have evidence that the story in question was "The Man Who Lived Backwards" by Charles F. Hall. The exact situation applies -- the time traveler cannot in any way alter the past world he finds himself in, because physical time travel to the past would require your physical substance to be present in two places ...


43

In context, I believe the river is death. As you correctly note, Aslan is Jesus, not an allegory for Jesus or another member of the Godhead, he's just Jesus. And unfortunately for humanity, there is no ocean that can be crossed to enter heaven; we have to die. In our universe, Jesus's forgiveness is the bridge that allows us to cross that barrier ...


36

@TillB is correct, the wardrobe only worked when you didn't expect to anything to be there. It was the same in both the book and the movie. Here's an excerpt from the book, right at the very end. The bolding is mine, to emphasize what's relevant to the question, but the italics are in the book itself. And that would have been the very end of the story ...


33

Yes. I don't know what editions you have where each of the seven books includes a different map, but in the beautiful editions I first read as a child, the following map was printed inside the front cover of several (probably all) of the books. It was drawn by Pauline Baynes, the official illustrator of the Narnia series, and shows Narnia and the ...


33

They aren't the only humans. And they aren't even the first humans to visit Narnia. The book The Magician's Nephew chronicles the first visitors to the land after Aslan creates Narnia. Others came to the land by other means. The Telmarines, for example, came through a cave after being shipwrecked on an island in our world. And yet others came via other ...


32

As far as the name "Aslan" is concerned, Lewis explained this directly in response to a letter asking this very question: Dear Miss Jenkins, It is a pleasure to answer your question. I found the name in the notes to Lane's Arabian Nights: it is Turkish for Lion. I pronounce it as Ass-lan myself. And of course I meant the Lion of Judah. I am so glad ...


29

It should be remembered that until Edmund asked for Turkish delight, Jadis had very likely never heard of it at all, and so the enchantments she used to create it were running on his ideas about it. It was already Edmund's favorite candy (or he would have asked for whatever his favorite candy was and we would be talking about that), and he could have been ...


28

C.S. Lewis stated unequivocally in a letter to a fan that the books can be read in any order but that his personal preference was that they should be read in the chronological order in which they were written. "I think I agree with your order {i.e. chronological} for reading the books more than with your mother's. The series was not planned beforehand as ...


28

I concur with Zeiss Ikon's answer: the story that inspired C. S. Lewis is "The Man Who Lived Backwards", a short story by Charles F. Hall, published in Tales of Wonder #3, Summer 1938. It should be noted that Tales of Wonder was a British magazine, not American as stated by Lewis. This would have been an easy mistake for him to make, as Tales of Wonder was ...


28

I doubt there's any particular significance to three mentions of cleaning swords across several hundred pages. There's a number of other passages that talk about how to care for weapons and armor, such as when the Pevensies recover their gifts in Prince Caspian: "Won't the string be perished, Su?" said Peter. But whether by some magic in the air ...


27

In From Narnia to a Space Odyssey: The War of Letters Between Arthur C. Clarke and C. S. Lewis, the first very short letter from Lewis to Clarke (December 7, 1943), Lewis is responding to Clarke's accusation that Lewis sees all SF as trashy space opera and that Lewis' portrait of Weston is colored by that. Lewis responds: I don't of course think that at any ...


21

No, not more than other weapons If you read (and preferably reread, a few times) what Lewis says via Aslan, the emphasis isn't on the deplorable word itself. The emphasis is on people's beliefs and attitudes. Charn and Jadis are used as a warning of what can happen when a ruler thinks primarily in terms of themselves, rather than in terms of their ...


19

I believe you have to separate "Narnia: the country ruled by the white witch and then by Peter/Susan/Edmund/Lucy", where there were no humans when the children initially entered "Narnia: the world that the four children visited", where there were several other groups of humans There were always humans in the World of Narnia, since the very beginning. (A ...


19

It would appear not. On Wikipedia's page for C. S. Lewis, on there no mention of any other works set in the Narnia world, though there are some works which were never finished. Likewise, on their Chronicles of Narnia page, there is no mention of any other works besides for the seven novels. However, his estate has authorized at least three other books: The ...


19

Without seeking to get into a theological debate (which may be impossible) - I do think it fair to consider Lewis' background as a Protestant Christian. There is a historical association with the Old Testament crossing of the River Jordan into the "Promised Land" by the Hebrew People and Protestant tradition of viewing the journey as a New Testament ...


19

In addition to the other excellent answers, I think reading the very next three sentences in the book should help clarify what was on C.S. Lewis's mind: And soon, very soon, before you are an old man and an old woman, great nations of your world will be ruled by tyrants who care no more for joy and justice and mercy than the Empress Jadis. Let your world ...


18

Hopefully someone can give a more detailed answer which matches up the characteristics of the planets to story elements, but just looking on the Planet Narnia website I see there are sub-pages for each planet which say which book the author believes was meant to be associated with it, and which list some of the qualities of that planet: Jupiter - The Lion, ...


18

The only rule when it comes to time spent in Narnia is that there is no rule about time spent in Narnia. Lewis intentionally made things inconstant, arbitrary, and dare I say, magical. That said, Lucy enters the wardrobe to visit Mr. Tumnus at one point, and then Edmund comes in a few moments later. They leave the wardrobe together, and end up at some point ...


12

The comparison between Narnian time and time in our world isn't consistent, except in one respect: time flows in the same direction in both worlds. A year into the future in our world might be three years or three thousand years into the future in Narnia, but it won't be a year into the past. So if person A enters Narnia from our world at one point (1920, ...


12

J.R.R. Tolkien said that no good fantasy would have ELECTRIC lamps in it. You can read this in his essay On Fairy-Stories, available in PDF form here: The electric street-lamp may indeed be ignored, simply because it is so insignificant and transient. Fairy-stories, at any rate, have many more permanent and fundamental things to talk about. Lightning, for ...


10

You are starting from flawed assumptions. Turkey is most notable to most of us for, Istanbul, better known as Constantinople, named after Constantine, ruler of the Eastern Roman Empire and made into its capital. Constantine is known for "Christianizing" Rome. So there is your "why use Turkey/Turkish" Why the Lion? Lions are a common symbol of royalty and ...


8

He does seem to make reference to a lamp on a post in The Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring: Chapter 5: A Conspiracy Unmasked The white bollards near the water's edge glimmered in the light of two lamps on high posts. While not technically the word "lamp-post"...if the shoe fits A more tenuous example: Return of the King: Chapter 1: Minis ...


8

A slightly different map, by David Bedell, is shown on Wikipedia - Narnia (World). As the original image is over 2MB, I can't include it inline, in this answer, but here is a direct link to the original image here. Here is slightly reduced quality version: This map is somewhat larger than the image provided by Rand al'Thor in his answer above. It also ...


8

C.S. Lewis never explains what the price was in the books or otherwise. The "where" is equally vague, but we can reasonably glean that it was not learned from a (still living) person, but rather a secret learned by finding the place that secret was hidden, and that learning it cost her something of great value to herself (note that she doesn't even ...


7

Beside the delightfullness of some brands of Turkish Delight according to some of those who have answered here, there is also the Turkishness of Turkish Delight to considered. If Communist Cookies, or Nazi Nougat, or Stalinist Sweets, or Enemy Eclairs, or Anarchist Apple Fritters, had been a popular band of candy or sweets when Lewis was writing, he might ...


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