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9

It seems from the text like Glozelle and Sopespian rushed the field before he had a chance to rise, eager to seize the opportunity to kill Miraz. The Lords Glozelle and Sopespian had their own plans ready. As soon as they saw their King down they leaped into the lists crying, "Treachery! Treachery! The Narnian traitor has stabbed him in the back while ...


2

The correct solution is to use whatever the contextually correct form of emphasis is for the ship name. This depends on the format and the default styling. As the question points out, when the running body text is in Roman type, emphasis typically means using italic type. When the emphasized text is embedded inside something that is already italicized, ...


14

As per a reference in chapter 8 of The Last Battle, the Lone Islands made Gale the King of Narnia (and all his descendants) Emperor of the Lone Islands. Although sovereign of the lone islands, the islands were in fact governed by a governor, up until the point Caspian did away the post (since the recently deposed governor had been a thoroughly despicable man)...


-1

What Polly did is not something Lewis as narrator really thinks it best not to ask about. It's merely a ploy - a rather patronising ploy, too - to manipulate the young reader into feeling like a his co-conspirator. "Everyone knows" children don't like washing, particularly not patches of skin with no mud or other obvious grime, which to their young ...


2

I don't think the girls averting their eyes is anything terribly allegorical. I can't imagine two school-aged girls wanting to watch the killing blow be struck on their beloved friend. I also don't think there was an enormous connection to the apostles falling asleep. The only allegory in this area I can think of would be witnesses to Jesus' crucifixion. Of ...


28

There's a bit of hidden nuance here. The original must be "had her bathe" because British English uses bathe as a noun meaning "a swim" or "a dip" (a meaning unknown in American English). C.S. Lewis is, of course, British. Therefore, she cannot go for a "bathe" without knowing how to swim. She's telling a white lie to ...


35

This clause is critical: "we know she was not much of a swimmer and perhaps it is best not to ask too many questions." Lewis was writing for children, and children have fears about not being able to do things that the other kids are doing—like not knowing how to ride a bike, or do a trick, or swim. The passage is intended to convey that Polly was ...


0

I have no idea why anybody would think to use "had a bath" as a euphemism for having a different kind of bath. It doesn't make any sense. Therefore, and I admit this is highly speculative, I would suggest that this must an extremely veiled poop joke. To meet the explanatory requirements here, the issue must: Be something Lewis (or the narrator) ...


38

She is "taking a bath" without actually getting into water except for maybe thigh deep. That means taking water by hand and washing the crucial parts (bottom, front, armpits, legs), while not wasting too much time on the other parts. As far as I can remember, at that point in the story they don't have any soap and the stream is cold. And you don't ...


9

Nice find! I'd never noticed this. Surely they can't be the same trees ... There's sooo many years between the two books (around 1000 years!) that the original trees would be either long dead or far too massive to stand between. Note that in The Magician's Nephew they're so close together that their branches can be used as a prison to contain a grown man, ...


41

"Faster than you can say Jack Robinson" (meaning very quickly) is a common English expression, from well before C. S. Lewis's time to the present day. The online Oxford English Dictionary (paywalled but you may have access through your public or university library) has citations ranging from 1763 to 2016. Quoting from the Wikipedia page for Jack ...


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