41

Isn't Cthulhu a god/alien? He may currently in the sea, but he's not a "creature of the sea" - and will not always be that way. Cthulhu is a Great Old One and is by far the most prominent member of the group. He currently lies in death-like sleep in the sunken city of R'lyeh somewhere in the Southeast Pacific Ocean. "When the stars are right", R'lyeh ...


38

It comes from his story "The Shadow Over Innsmouth", where a character named Zadok says: "Yield up enough sacrifices an' savage knick-knacks an' harbourage in the taown when they wanted it, an' they'd let well enough alone. Wudn't bother no strangers as might bear tales aoutside—that is, withaout they got pryin'. All in the band of the faithful—Order o' ...


38

Are you paraphrasing, or do you remember any sources that specifically refer to "constellations"? Doing a text search (control-F, or command-F if you're using a Mac) of "The Call of Cthulhu" online shows no instances of the word "constellation", but there are several parts that predicted Cthulhu would come back "when the stars were right". Here's the section ...


29

The word "cultist" wasn't common at the time. Lovecraft's productive period was 1908~1936. In the Google book corpus, the word “cultist” only pops up around the 1920s, and then again only gets popular considerably later; see here. It must have felt like a neologism back then, and we all know how Lovecraft was fond of archaisms rather than novelties. ...


25

Alrighty, in the absence of more informed answers: I think you’re right that Lovecraft only described Cthulhu in The Call of Cthulhu. The description there reads: A monster of vaguely anthropoid outline, but with an octopus-like head whose face was a mass of feelers, a scaly, rubbery-looking body, prodigious claws on hind and fore feet, and long, narrow ...


24

That depends largely on which stories you're talking about. The Elder Things, like most of the other extra-terrestrial creatures in Lovecraft's original stories, can't really be described as "good" or "evil" in the traditional sense. They were alien, so ascribing human motivations to them is somewhat pointless. For the most part, they simply existed on ...


18

Cthulhu as drawn by H. P. Lovecraft and a sculpture based on drawing from Lovecraft. the Elder sign shown below (the "leaf" one, not the "eye" one) was drawn by Lovecraft in a 1930 letter to Clark Ashton Smith.


18

I'm going to post the results of my own reading and research here, although honestly I was hoping someone already had a list from Lovecraft scholarship that they could share! This list is subject to revision, expansion, deletion, and rearrangement as I find out more. Authors whose works Lovecraft drew elements from Robert W. Chambers The King in Yellow (...


17

Zadock Allen's story in The Shadow Over Innsmouth is the best example in HP's works of people (a whole town) turning to the worship of the Old Ones. As with any IRL cult, it's a combination of accident, active recruiting and a "calling". Even before meeting the islanders that gave him the instructions to contact the Old Ones, Obed Marsh was inclined to look ...


16

Yes, he used the exact phrase "cosmic horror." But not to describe the beings of which he wrote! So far as I can make out, when he mentions cosmic horror --whether in his stories or his essays-- it is the ideas, not the monsters, to which he refers. In his essay Supernatural Horror in Literature, Lovecraft describes his philosophy of cosmic indifference: ...


15

Piggybacking off the quote provided in Hypnosifl's answer, it is likely that it is related to our solar system orbiting around the galaxy, which takes 225-250 million years. This is the only explanation that plausibly allows "uncounted millions of years rolled by." to make sense, but also allows a repeated and predictable "star's aligning". http://earthsky....


13

Cthulhu is definitely not an aquatic creature, despite the octopoid head. (Lovecraft sketched the monster once, and drew it with 6 eyes like a spider's.) It came from the stars and was not made of terrene matter. In its first appearance, "The Call of Cthulhu", it is stated that when its city R'lyeh sank beneath the ocean, it could no longer influence men ...


13

The King in Yellow, by Robert W Chambers, is one known influence to Lovecraft. HP Lovecraft himself included references to "the King in Yellow" in some of his works, although mainly as a written play that people found and sometimes read. One of many occult texts Lovecraft referred to, such as the Necronomicon. Lovecraft also associated Hastur with the ...


12

I am one of the developers and saw your post recently. We used many references from H.P. Lovecraft's works but there is no, one specific book we aimed to predominate the story.


12

Charles Stross's afterword to the story in his collection Wireless states that 'A Colder War' was written well before 'The Atrocity Archive', which is unrelated, but explores similar themes: A couple of years later, some of the questions raised by this story came back to haunt me in a different context as I began writing “The Atrocity Archive.” But I can’...


12

At the Mountains of Madness is every bit as much sci-fi as Ridley Scott's Alien is. Both stories involve travel to a remote location by means of the most advanced technology of the day. Both make some attempt at quantifying a terrible horror. Both ultimately dive deep into the horror genre. Do they cross genres? Yes. Do they exhibit clear properties of ...


12

They come, independently, from two different cultures but have a the same root. That root is helplessness. The commonality is that there are things that are bigger than you are and that you are insignificant in their eyes. Giant monsters have been a staple of most cultures: dragons (western and eastern), giants, hydra, giant dogs/wolves, etc. They often ...


11

No Lovecraft never really created a strict pantheon of gods, so there was never any mention of "X being enemy/brother of Y" - for HPL his monsters were just background for the story itself: According to David E. Schultz, Lovecraft never meant to create a canonical Mythos but rather intended his imaginary pantheon to serve merely as a background element. ...


11

Not all Great Old Ones induce madness. Looking upon Cthulu will drive all humans insane, but viewing Yig, the "Father of Serpents", does not. Yig is described as "shapen like a man, except ye look at him clost." This description strongly indicates that he can be looked at without going insane. Yig's description is in "The Curse of Yig" (collaboration ...


10

No relationship between Cthulhu and Hastur was mentioned in any of Lovecraft's original stories (I think Lovecraft only once mentioned Hastur in a list of names of powerful entities in The Whisperer in Darkness, see the quote here), this rivalry was created by August Derleth in his own "Cthulhu Mythos" stories written after Lovecraft's death. This entry at a ...


10

It is completely unknown. There are no clues in the story that suggest a particular individual. Based on his use of Dark Ages Latin, the skilled wizard whose salts were number 118 would seem to be somebody who was not otherwise alluded to in the story. None of the possibilities raised in the original narrative or the current question (Ezra Weeden, Charles ...


9

First of all, Hastur is referred as "Him who Is not to be Named", right ? But why this name in particular ? Is it explained somewhere, maybe by another author ? If by "another author" you mean another author besides Lovecraft, note that Lovecraft himself never identified "Him Who is not to be Named" with Hastur. In The Whisperer in Darkness, Lovecraft has ...


9

The People of the Pit by A. Merritt. You're description is spot on. I'm not sure we're ever told exactly where the story is set, but it starts with the blue light from beyond the mountain shaped lie a hand: North of us a shaft of light shot half way to the zenith. It came from behind the five peaks. The beam drove up through a column of blue haze whose ...


8

The short answer is no. We spent many hours and emailed a large number of people to check on this several years ago when we were doing research for a short movie/story a friend of ours had written. But there are many writers who have used this creature in their writings, I guess you have already read the wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azathoth


8

Cthulhu has octopoid features and is trapped underwater, but he is not a sea creature. In fact, in "The Call of Cthulhu," it's mentioned that the water is actually a bad thing from his point of view, because it blocks his telepathic communications with the cult and keeps him and the rest of the Great Old Ones imprisoned. August Derleth tried to make him into ...


8

The Mi-Go were supposed to use their wings (extruded from a gelatinous mass on their back) only in space and only when beating against the aether, a previously believed mystical medium (theorized in early Greek mysticism but remaining a popular idea until the late 1800's) that filled the region between the stars and planets. The "Mi-go" are large, ...


8

Because Lovecraft (in Laundry-verse) was a fraud whose work was, by and large, not very close to the Truth. Even so, the Laundry and its counterparts in other countries did censor some of his works which, by pure chance, came a little too close to the actual truth. Stross goes into some detail on the topic in his short story Equoid (fair warning, this story ...


8

I don't believe that HPL ever addressed that, but we can speculate: The Necronomicon had several editions: Original written some time before 738 Translated to Greek in 950 Translated from Greek to Latin by Olaus Wormius * in 1228 Published in Latin in the XV century in Germany and in the XVII century in Spain Published in Greek in the XVI century in ...


8

A pun is more than just a word that has multiple meanings; it's a word with multiple meanings that both/all make sense in context. I'm a big fan of whiteboards. I find them re-markable. Since "remarkable" here can mean both "interesting/astounding" and "able to be marked on multiple times" (especially since you literally "mark" a whiteboard with a marker)...


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