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One radically contrary theory is that Batman wants villains - and everyone else including us - to think he has no superpowers, while his strength, agility, endurance, and ability to recover from injury all suggest otherwise. This is a very brief summary of the excellent and hilarious video Batman's Secret Super Power! - Comic Theory | Comicstorian. In short,...


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To the common street criminal, Batman must appear to be supernatural. This is all based on his premise: Criminals are a superstitious cowardly lot. So my disguise must be able to strike terror into their hearts. I must be a creature of the night, black, terrible... - DC # 33 (1939) Also confirmed in Batman: The Musical. ...


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The answer would depend on which villain, and which universe you're speaking about. We are told that Bruce Wayne chose the image of a bat to "strike fear into the heart of his enemies". In fact, everything about his physical appearance is used to create a false image that he is more than just a man. In the movie incarnations, his body armour makes him look ...


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In Justice League Unlimited she gets turned into a pig and Batman and Zatanna have to save her and she gets caught in a butchery where pigs are slaughtered and almost gets shot by a guy and barely manages to lift her now pig like bracers up to stop the bullet. They make it look as if she would have been shot in this form if she didn't use her bracers.


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Planet Master would be affected the same as any other normal human man. If you watch the Batman the Brave and the Bold episode where Batman raves Green Arrow to stop some escaped criminals. Then as Green Arrow is falling behind the Bat, Batman gets warped to the planet Zurr En Arrh and gains the powers of Superman but has a weakness of yellow Kryptonite. ...


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No. While I'm not able to quote a specific example there are literally dozens of variations on this theme in pop culture some from before Batman, or any comics, started publication. "Turn that frown upside down" and "put on a happy face" are just two examples of songs that the Joker has referenced. It's possible Batman Beyond used that particular variation ...


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There was an acknowledgement of the situation by Batman, at least—although I am afraid I cannot locate the comic. It was probably when the two characters crossed over for the first time, in the 1940s or 1950s. According to Wikipedia, the similarity between the heroes in Green Arrow's earliest days was practically comical: He retooled the concept into a ...


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That's an interesting question, because it led me to do some search and discover that what many consider the obvious reason -and I did too for many years- for many others is not even taken into consideration. And, I've not been able to find any kind of official answer too. Anyway...here I have to go by memory because I don't have the comics at hand reach. ...


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Probably impossible to state by virtue of his being a fifth dimensional imp. The Fifth Dimension is an inter-dimensional reality that exists outside of the normally accepted space/time continuum. - https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Fifth_Dimension Since he comes from a place with with different rules for time, he could be any age.


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In the campy 1966 movie Batman, Batman and Robin find themselves in the Batcave faced with henchmen of the Joker and/or Penguin, after the Penguin (whom B&R have brought into the Batcave for some reason) Batman and Robin didn't mean to kill those henchmen, but they certainly did! Batman later figures out that This is, of course, the same movie ...


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Unintentional Murder Batman? But of course (the other two mentioned in the piece are covered by Lethal Carrot): After reviewing the evidence, we can pretty confidently say that Batman is the superhero who holds the record for "accidentally" crushing the most folks to death in junkyards, an oddly specific scenario that so far has taken the lives of three ...


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Like most elements of Superman, this depends on the version you are speaking of [Golden Age, Silver Age, Bronze Age, and Modern Age; further to that, we have Post-Crisis, New 52 and Rebirth.] Various media would portray Kryptonians extent to the knowledge as anywhere from Common place to theoretical. I'll try to find some initial examples, then modify it ...


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Batman's very first appearance in Detective Comics #27 features what appears to be an accidental killing (although he certainly isn't remorseful).


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Batman accidentally kills The Joker in the end scene of the game Arkham City.


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Perhaps the implication is that he is holding his breath for, say, 5/6 of the time, then phasing inside and taking a breath for the other 1/6. His idle animation does include him zooming away every so often.


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In Detective Comics Issue 613 Batman kicks a thug into someone else and they both fall into the grinder on the back of a garbage truck. From his reaction it is pretty clear that he didn't mean to do this. Click images to enlarge.


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In Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, we learn that Mxyzptlk is 6000(ish) years old. Mister Mxyzptlk: The big problem with being immortal is filling your time. For example, I spent the first two thousand years of my existence doing absolutely nothing. Mister Mxyzptlk: Eventually, simple inertia became tiresome, so I spent the next ...


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As per the list Valorum posted, it sounds like this might be a reference to Batman: Endgame, specifically the last issue, Batman Vol.2 # 40: Batman: Endgame is a four-issue miniseries which sees the final epic battle between the Clown Prince of Crime and the Dark Knight. Things get crazy in this issue after Joker cuts off Alfred's hand and tortures Jim ...


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The original storyboards describe them as "Hoods". Hood(lum) #1 and Hood(lum) #2 don't appear to have actual names and don't seem to appear in any subsequent episodes.


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I haven't found anything explicit but in Action Comics Issues 848 and 849 Clark has a bit of a battle with faith and in it we get some insight into his early life in Smallville. In Issue 848 we get a few flashbacks to Clark as a child and in some of these we see him going to church. Click image to enlarge. In Issue 849 he stops by Smallville and has a talk ...


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A speedster can definitely phase through a Kryptonian. He just merely passes through Now if he really wants to hurt Superman, say pull out his organs, he just hurts himself. There is no way he can expect to materialize is hand in Superman's body. He would be trying to displace something that is much more durable than him. So, bottomline is that The Flash ...


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The codex was essentially base level genetic information, which, frankly, could be carried by any living being. Getting stung by a bee, for instance, introduces trillions of bits of DNA coding from that specific hive into your system, but it won't make you any "stronger". I'm guessing Jor-el coded it into his son's cells so the genetic legacy of the planet ...


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In the comics, Kryptonians from hundreds of years before settled on the world of Daxam and interbred with the locals, producing a genetic offshoot known as the Daxamites. There existence is a major story element within the current CW Supergirl show canon.


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A number of strong suggestions for this difference were provided in this wiki: https://superman.fandom.com/wiki/Clark_Kent It should be noted that this page uses a picture form the early 2000s series Superman: Secret Origin which has a less cartoonish or exaggerated, more "realistic" art style, putting everything from facial features and body proportions to ...


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When we say "Clark Kent", I'm guessing we are speaking of his "mortal" persona. That being the case, I'm guessing we mean actual hobbies that he does to amuse himself, as well as stuff he does to "fit in" with that persona. There are several, actually, depending on what version you are speaking of. I'll try to provide example where able. Post-Crisis Clark ...


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As stated, the scene was highly metaphorical. In either case, though, it's unlikely that Superman was "drunk" on anything but the synthetic Kryptonite; canonically, unless he lost his powers, earth-based alcohol doesn't affect Kryptonians anymore than any other calories they ingest. Essentially, the "weakening" was to show the transfer of dominance back to ...


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At least two other characters were shown to take the mantle of The Red Hood 1. Victoria Beaumont In Batman Adventures (2003) Issue. #8, The Red Hood is shown to be expanding his (her, to be precise) criminal empire across six cities : Central City, Metropolis, New York, Seattle, Star City and Los Angeles. By the looks of the costume, one could assume ...


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Thomas Grayson appears as Red Hood in Justice League: Generation Lost. His first appearance is in the Issue 14 and it comes with a handy label. However, it seems here that Re Hood is working with the new Batman rather than against him. Anders Overbeck, aka Professor Overbeck, also appears as Red Hood in Batman '66 Issues 7 and 8 although he is under the ...


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In the DC comics, people who get powers posses a "metagene", a chromosomal anomaly that allows them to (potentially) survive great danger by rapidly developing abilities which either allow them to survive the dangerous event, or in the case of energy-based events, absorb or metabolize the energy. It's not a guarantee that having the metagene will cause one ...


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Irving Norbet as Planet Master only really appears in Detective Comics Vol. 1 #296. However, we do get to see a few of his suits in that issue and what their powers are: Mercury Suit Spouts fire jets from the gloves and the suit itself, can envelop itself in flames and melt steel. It is so inspired because Mercury is one of the hottest planets being so ...


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Through the comics history the cave is often depicted as either heavily built up possibly using concrete or metal or very natural with a series of machinery integrated into it. Being realistic. How do you fabricate a super high tech headquarters and disguise your activities as general business? "Spare parts" Step 1: Gather the resources you'll need (Steel, ...


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On another, but well related note, a very popular Web series, Because Science discussed exactly why having super strength and interacting with an everyday environment calibrated for regular strength would be difficult. Here, they used a base of about 100 times regular strength as a reference point, and pointed to Superman specifically as an example of how ...


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This has been an established part of Superman's characterization since his earliest comics. The implication being he had to "learn" to manage his strength from the time of his boyhood, and apply only the barest fraction of it to function in every day life, let alone to dealing with mortals in any type of physical situation. There are several instances of ...


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Superman and the Legion of Super-Heroes was a Geoff Johns story in Action Comics which featured a xenophobic future Earth, and a sun turned red using Sun Boy's abilities. Superman loses his powers, and recovers them at the proverbial last moment when Sun-Boy is released. Both this story and War of the Supermen play a bit fast and loose with the established ...


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There was an episode of Superman:TAS called Solar Powered of which this was the exact basis. To Nutshell it: A human scientist called Edward Lytner takes on the persona of the villain Luminous and, seeking revenge on Superman who had put him into prison earlier, uses the Lex Corp satellites to diffuse the yellow rays of the sun and turn them red in earth's ...


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