112

Hermione has always been an objective individual I think her preferred Hallow was a symbol of the type of person she is. In some sense, both Harry and Ron gravitated towards the Hallows that addressed some deep personal issues of their own (Ron's insecurities and Harry's great losses). In comparison, Hermione was someone who preferred to make her decision ...


107

There are many fundamental errors in your question itself. I really suggest you go back and read the books because your understanding of both the Hallows and Harry's resurrection is wrong. Firstly, Harry was the owner of Elder Wand having won it from Draco Malfoy when he escaped from Malfoy Manor. Draco became the owner of Elder wand when he disarmed ...


95

Hermione is correct, it is obvious from the tale which gift is best. The brother who got the wand was killed the night after he boasted of the powerful wand. The brother who got the stone soon killed himself. The brother who got the cloak lived a long life and died in peace. And then he (the younges brother) greeted Death as an old friend, and went with ...


69

“And Voldemort never knew about the Hallows?” “I do not think so, because he did not recognize the Resurrection Stone he turned into a Horcrux. But even if he had known about them, Harry, I doubt that he would have been interested in any except the first. He would not think that he needed the Cloak, and as for the stone, whom would he want to bring ...


67

Being more powerful does not make you more skilful. If the duel between Dumbledore and Grindelwald was strictly about wand versus wand then you would be correct in that Grindelwald should have won. But the duel was also man versus man, and Dumbledore was more skilled, as he says in Deathly Hallows (Chapter 35): I knew that we were evenly matched, perhaps ...


65

It's unambiguously referring to the wood. So Death crossed to an elder tree on the banks of the river, fashioned a wand from a branch that hung there, and gave it to the oldest brother. And: “Nah, that story’s just one of those things you tell kids to teach them lessons, isn’t it? ‘Don’t go looking for trouble, don’t pick fights, don’t go messing ...


58

Defeat isn't limited to death. Harry won it from Draco just by overpowering him and taking his other wand. Death is only part of the wand's history. It's not necessary. So Voldemort, on killing Gregorovitch, never won the wand as Gregorovitch was no longer the owner. We can twist some words to say that 'stealing' a wand is nearly the same as 'defeat', as, ...


56

It doesn't seem like it's widely associated with Grindelwald. It was carved at Durmstrang, so the students there knew it as a sign of Grindelwald, but it seems like the association between Grindelwald and the Deathly Hallows symbol is fairly limited. Grindelwald having any sort of mark is never mentioned in anything Hermione's read about him. “Then it’s ...


51

He had probably heard stories of the Elder Wand but never heard the story of the Deathly Hallows. As the story of the Deathly Hallows is considered by most wizards to be nothing more than a children's tale, he wouldn't be likely to find it in a school textbook. It's not likely to be in the books on dark magic either, since, as Xenophilius Lovegood says: "....


49

In Chapter Twenty-Two of Deathly Hallows we see Harry thinking about Voldemort going after the Hallows: Voldemort had been raised in a Muggle orphanage. Nobody could have told him The Tales of Beedle the Bard when he was a child, any more than Harry had heard them. Hardly any wizards believed in the Deathly Hallows. Was it likely that Voldemort knew about ...


47

Rowling intended Grindelwald as a metaphor for Hitler, and his Deathly Hallows symbol parallels Hitler's Swastika. J.K. Rowling: You know Owen who won the [UK television] competition to interview me? He asked about Grindelwald He said, “Is it coincidence that he died in 1945,” and I said no. It amuses me to make allusions to things that were happening in ...


45

This is a complicated topic. What is not made clear in canon, but is explained later by J.K. Rowling, is the fact that if a wizard or witch defeats another and earns the allegiance of their opponent's wand, all wands under the control of the opponent switch allegiance to the victor and it is possible for a witch or wizard to be the master of more than ...


42

Well, you are making the same mistake Voldemort made. The ownership of the Elder Wand doesn't change by murdering only. Grindelwald stole it from Gregorovitch, which is enough to consider the wand won. Gregorovitch must have stolen it as well, since there's no reason to think he was a murder or exceptional at dueling (he was only a wandmaker, an artisan). ...


42

Dumbledore did indeed use the stone incorrectly. In his excitement to recall his lost family, he let himself forget that the ring was a Horcrux and he simply put the ring on. However since this was, at the time, one of Voldemort's horcruxes, putting the ring on triggered the curse that would have killed Dumbledore, which is why he made Snape promise to ...


40

The true Master of Death is that individual who fully accepts mortality and is not afraid to die himself. It's not about possessing or using the Hallows; it's about accepting the inevitability of death, which is something Voldemort was completely unable to do, but Harry was able to accept the concept of the inevitability of death. I think this is really ...


39

A thestral tail hair. From J.K. Rowling’s website: I decided that the core of the Elder Wand is the tail hair of a Thestral; a powerful and tricky substance that can be mastered only by a witch or wizard capable of facing death. This is backed up by a comment in an interview: MA: Speaking of the Elder Wand... JKR: Yeah? MA: Can we talk ...


37

Harry was in possession of all of the Hallows at some point in time, as was Dumbledore. Harry arguably owned all of them for most of Book 7. He had the cloak and the stone inside of the snitch, although he didn't know it until near the end of the book, and he owned the wand, although he didn't know it, nor did he have it for most of the book. He did ...


37

There's a moment in The Deathly Hallows where Harry, Ron, and Hermione apparate into Hogsmeade while it is under control of the Death Eaters. They trip the Caterwauling Charm and are hiding under the cloak. The Death Eaters come out looking for them, but can't see them. One of them tries the summoning charm on the cloak: “Accio Cloak!” roared one of the ...


36

The Tale of the Three Brothers is setup as a fairy tale. In HP and the Deathly Hallows, when Hermione is reading the story, she reminds Harry of this: "Sorry," interjected Harry, "but Death spoke to them?" It's a fairy tale, Harry!" "Right, sorry. Go on." (Page 407 Scholastic paperback) And later, when Harry is talking to "Dumbledore" in ...


36

Here's an image of the book, got by a Google search for "Deathly Hallows first edition". This certainly looks like the version I remember buying day of release. You can see on the spine the Deathly Hallows symbol. Higher res version here. EDIT Regarding JK's involvement with the symbol - the only thing I could find was that JK wrote and illustrated the ...


36

Based off this scene: We know that the light does not travel from inside the cloak -> out, as Harry must hold the lamp outside of his cloak in order to see the books. If he held the lamp inside his cloak the light would only spread inside the cloak, and perhaps under his feet if there were some gaps. Since there is no light going out, it is safe to say that ...


34

Pottermore has a bit more information about wandlore specifically relating to the creation of wands in elder wood. According to Ollivander himself, wandmakers tend to avoid it because; It's difficult to work with. It's perceived to be unlucky (which means they're difficult to sell). The wands are notoriously disloyal. Only the most exceptional wizards ...


33

There are two factors that led to Voldemort's defeat. One is, as you've noted, his failure to master the Elder Wand. But the other is the failure of all of his spells after he cast Avada Kedavra on Harry. Because Harry died to save his friends, he and they received the same kind of magical protection that Harry bore after his mother died to save him. The ...


32

I believe that the answer to this question lies with the creation of the Hallows. There are two main theories regarding how they were created. In Tales of Beedle the Bard, we are told in the story of The Three Brothers that the Hallows were made by Death himself. If that is indeed the truth, then the magic that imbues the Hallows with their power is Death's....


30

In the tale that Hermione tells: "Leaving his enemy dead on the floor, the oldest brother proceeded to an inn, where he boasted loudly of the powerful wand that he had snatched from Death himself, and of how it made him invincible. "That very night, another wizard crept upon the oldest brother as he lay, wine-sodden, upon his bed. The thief took the ...


28

I mean, Harry wears clothes and glasses. Those turn invisible along with him. In regards to creatures, Harry uses the Cloak in the first book to get Norbert to a high tower in Hogwarts. He, Hermione, Norbert, the large crate Norbert is in, and Norbert's teddy bear are all invisible. Every indication would seem to be that everything under the cloak, living ...


25

In the case of Dumbledore, I think he was very clear while talking with Harry in the King's Cross scene in Deathly Hallows that the Hallows were pretty irresistible to him. I'd suggest that Dumbledore was able to harbor the Elder Wand, but perhaps he was just unable to destroy it. By that I mean he was emotionally unable to destroy it - he just couldn't ...


25

Simply put, Voldemort is not one for half measures. Could he be guaranteed the wand’s allegiance by just defeating Snape? What if the wand still did not fully work for him? Well, then he’d have to kill Snape anyway. So why not take the most logical route for someone with no qualms about murder – just kill Snape and assure the wand’s allegiance. He has ...


25

It most likely hides the light produced from an outside viewer. There’s only one example of someone using Lumos (or any form of light) while holding the light source itself under the Cloak as well. Harry seemed to be using Lumos to read while hiding under the Invisibility Cloak when he stayed in the library overnight trying to figure out how to breathe ...


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