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111

Idiocracy IMDb has the following summary for the film: Private Joe Bauers, the definition of "average American", is selected by the Pentagon to be the guinea pig for a top-secret hibernation program. Forgotten, he awakes five centuries in the future. He discovers a society so incredibly dumbed down that he's easily the most intelligent person alive. As ...


71

"Babies having to associate books and electrocution" is most certainly Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley. You can read the whole text here (I'm assuming huxley.net is a legit source). The infants were unloaded. "Now turn them so that they can see the flowers and books." [...] The Director rubbed his hands. "Excellent!" he said. "It might ...


51

The short story that the radio play was based on may be Gordon R. Dickson's Computers Don't Argue. A similar question was asked not too long ago, and this story was the answer to it. The story is written as a series of letters, many of which are generated by a computer or written by bureaucrats. The original minor offense was for an overdue book payment, ...


49

This sounds a lot (aka exactly) like Gattaca. Dystopian society - check Male protagonist is not genetically modified - check Jobs based on genetic tests, which the protagonist fakes - check major surgery to be taller - check protagonist trying to be astronaut - check treadmill scene - check DNA from hair left in comb - check


47

Null has identified the written story that radio play was based on as "Computers Don't Argue" by Gordon R. Dickson, which was also the answer to this old question and this one. I'm adding this answer in an attempt to identify the radio play itself. A "semi-dramatized" reading of "Computers Don't Argue", with musical accompaniment, was aired in 1978 on the ...


44

This is The Flight of the Horse by Larry Niven. It's a fixup novel built from a compilation of stories about the hapless Hanville Svetz who is tasked with retrieving the things you mention. The collection of the unicorn is the first story. During the mission Svetz collapses because his metabolism is adapted to the high carbon dioxide levels of modern Earth ...


32

Short answer: It was a decision by the american publisher. The European edition always had the final chapter. From Wikipedia: The book has three parts, each with seven chapters. Burgess has stated that the total of 21 chapters was an intentional nod to the age of 21 being recognised as a milestone in human maturation. The 21st chapter was omitted ...


29

That's Idiocracy, for sure. In a speech, President Camacho gives Joe the impossible job of fixing the nation's food shortages, Dust Bowls, and crippled economy within a week. Joe discovers that the nation's crops are irrigated with a sports drink named "Brawndo", whose parent corporation had purchased the FDA, FCC, and USDA. When Joe has the drink ...


24

The Moreau series by S. Andrew Swann (aka Steven Swiniarski) Forests of the Night Emperors of the Twilight Specters of the Dawn Fearful Symmetries A summary of Forests of the Night from Goodreads: Set in Cleveland 100 years in the future, this debut novel is the story of Nohar Rajasthan, Private Eye, who's a moreau--descended from genetically ...


21

The Gregory Zilboorg translation renders that line as "0.2" or "two tenths" of the population that did not die out, which suggests that the original text may have said as much. (bolding mine) .... In the thirty-fifth year before the foundation of the United State our contemporary petroleum food was invented. True, only about two tenths of the population ...


19

This Time of Darkness by Helen Mary Hoover The only thing that doesn't fit is that the boy is called Axel, not Michael. EDIT: in fact it turns out at the end that his real name is Michael, so it fits perfectly (thanks to Buzz for telling me this). From Goodreads: Eleven-year-old Amy lives in a decaying underground city. Ignored by her mother and under ...


19

"Spending a Day at the Lottery Fair", a short story by Frederik Pohl; first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, October 1983, available at the Internet Archive. Of course it wasn't like that for the regular American fairgoers. They had to pay. You could see each family group moving up toward the ticket windows. They would slow down ...


18

From the DVD commentary, director Kurt Wimmer: You know, there's a number of films Fahrenheit 451, Logan's Run, Gattaca, Brave New World, 1984, THX-1138, The Matrix, Alphaville, A Clockwork Orange, Handmaiden's [sic] Tale, Judge Dredd, even Triumph of the Will--- all of these were films that I was accused of unapologetically ripping off to make this film. ...


18

The Last Job. I haven't found a film version of it, but here's the transcipt of a scene from NPR (it was apparently commissioned from The Truth by Planet Money). There's also a version on Soundcloud. MCNERNEY: (As David Kirsch) My specialty is robotics, mostly alignment and replacement. I help keep our society in perfect working order so everyone stays ...


17

The "whisper line" features in Alfred Bester's The Stars, My Destination. Gully Foyle has a Monte Cristo education in prison through whisper-line conversations with his teacher, Jizbella McQueen: "...My God, this must be real! You're talking the gutter lingo. You must be real. Who are you?" "Gully Foyle." "But you're not in my cell. You're not ...


17

Could this be "The Screwfly Solution" by Raccoona Sheldon? (AKA Alice Sheldon, AKA James Tiptree Jr.)? Per wikipedia, the main character is a researcher working in South America. At the end she's hiding out in Canada which she describes thusly: "Up north, Anne was biting her lip in shame and pain." The story begins with an exchange of letters and news ...


17

Yes, that's Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Kurt Vonnegut.


16

The author is Орлин Крумов (Orlin Krumov) and the title of the story is Три минути за вашето самоубийство translated to Three Minutes for Your Suicide. The story was written in 1988 and was found in one of the stories from Списание „Наука и техника за младежта“, №472 (Magazine "Science and technology for the youth", no 472). The short story is available here:...


16

The short story you refer to is: A.: ONLY THROUGH DEATH WILL YOU LEARN YOUR TRUE IDENTITY By ETGAR KERET, published in Wired magazine and available to read here: https://www.wired.com/2016/12/etger-keret-true-identity-through-death/ The kids were A. and N. Antoine and Nadia. They appear to be orphans at a special institute, but the truth is far more ...


15

Must be Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. People are classified by Greek letters of the alphabet. I don't remember the irradiation, but the bit about electroshocks is definite. The authorities think it's a waste of time for workers to like books and flowers.


14

Stanisław Lem's The Futurological Congress has chemically induced "realities" to cover up poverty/government failures (even if they turn out to be a dream-within-a-dream / hallucination-inside-a-hallucination thing). The (quite short) book is from 1971 (as am I, so I'm reluctant to say that it's "very old", but it still seems a good match).


14

That sounds like David Wingrove's Chung Kuo series. It's a series of 8 books, set a couple of hundred years in the future. China dominates the Earth, and there are numerous space stations as well as colonies on Mars. The Chinese have re-written history so that they seem to always have been in charge. The Earth is covered in huge hive cities, with most ...


14

Sounds a lot like Fahrenheit 451. Most of the movie adaptations follow suit. Montag [the main character] leaves the river in the countryside, where he meets the exiled drifters, led by a man named Granger. They have each memorized books should the day come that society comes to an end, then rebuilds itself anew; this time, with the survivors learning to ...


13

You're describing "Virtual Nightmare", a 2000 made-for-TV scifi movie from Australia. The film opens in a goofy and wholly anachronistic 1950s setting with muscle cars, Patsy Cline/Beach Boys music, sushi restaurants and flatscreen TVs. The virtual reality environment is projected by means of a glowing green script which the main character starts to see ...


13

"The Silk and the Song", a novelette by Charles L. Fontenay; first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July 1956, available at the Internet Archive; also the answer to this old question. Here are some covers under which it has appeared; see anything familiar? Your description of the story is very good. Here is the rhyme you remember: ...


13

"Native Tongue" by Suzette Haden Elgin You describe "Native Tongue" by Suzette Haden Elgin almost perfectly. The linguist are the guild that uses the learning ability of children to acquire alien languages. According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzette_Haden_Elgin#Native_Tongue_series, "Native Tongue" was followed by two sequels "Judas Rose" and "...


13

I figured it out - Clockwork Angels: The novel. The band was Rush. A remarkable collaboration that is unprecedented in its scope and realization, this exquisitely wrought novel represents an artistic project between the bestselling science fiction author Kevin J. Anderson and the multiplatinum rock band Rush. The newest album by Rush, Clockwork ...


12

There is an Ayn Rand story with that plot: "Anthem". I haven't read it in rather a long time and can't recall a lot of detail. Odd side note Neil Peart credited the story with inspiring the story in the Rush album 2112


12

"Why Johnny Can't Speed" by Alan Dean Foster. It's in a collection named "With Friends Like These" (1984). Weaponized cars fighting on the freeways of SoCal in a dystopian future. Kill flags stamped on the side of the car a la WW2 fighter planes. Offensive driving is the best defensive driving. Now I want to reread it.


12

You are looking for the short story titled Consumers Report, with the subtitle No Gun to the Victor. It was written by Theodore Cogswell, and appeared in at least the following anthologies: Imagination Science Fiction, October 1955 1955-10-00 Backdrop of Stars 1968-03-00, 1975-05-00 SF: Authors' Choice 1968-06-00 The Third Eye 1968-09-00 Voyages: Scenarios ...


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