144

The author himself, Isaac Asimov, wrote in the Author's Note of the Prelude to Foundation that he is providing a guide for those readers that might appreciate it since the books "were not written in the order in which (perhaps) they should be read." Therein, he offers the following chronological order: The Complete Robot (1982) Collection of 31 Short ...


122

The Mule's name is self-chosen and refers to his sterility "Secondly, we did not know of your physical shortcomings, particularly the one that seemed so important to you, that you adopted the name of the Mule. We didn't foresee that you were not merely a mutant, but a sterile mutant and the added psychic distortion due to your inferiority complex ...


66

I think that neither published order nor chronological order quite does the series justice. Here's the order I think makes the most sense for maximum enjoyment of the books. You'll notice that I've left some out. The series was never quite finished, so I feel that a non-linear approach is the best choice here. This allows one to emphasize the building of ...


52

Definitely not, given Trantor's physical location in the galaxy and its planetary properties. Trantor is located as close to the galactic core as possible for humans to still be able to inhabit it. It is also slightly larger than Earth. Trantor was first mentioned in a short story by Asimov, 'Black Friar of the Flame', later collected as The Early Asimov, ...


40

Because he's sterile, like most mules.


37

I think neither the published order nor the chronological order do the series justice. I always have recommended the series in the following order: I, Robot (some lists omit this, but this is really the "origin" story of this universe - The Complete Robot can be substituted here, since it contains the same stories as I, Robot) The Elijah Baley series (...


36

Short answer, it's not all underground. "Trantor's buildings are all subterranean or under domes due to worsening weather conditions" as indicated by Wikipedia, sourced to Prelude to Foundation, pages 110 and 118. And, in the original trilogy, the city was described as being towers, closer to Coruscant's depiction.


35

When describing Trevize's ship capabilities and performance in "Foundation's Edge", he is awestruck at the way the ship can chain jumps with computation time close to zero and deviation from target coordinates also negligible, thus pointing to should-be normal, expected behaviour of a ship in-universe. End point of the Jump needs to be accurately calculated ...


26

The answer is given in Prelude to Foundation -- it's climate change. Trantor's climate deteriorated as it was developed and urbanised, to the extent that people preferred to live underground. And Trantor itself is a bigger puzzle than almost any world. According to the records, it had a fairly normal weather pattern when it was first settled. Then, as ...


24

In Foundation and Earth, Golan Trevize states that there is an issue with attempting intergalactic travel. He mentions in particular that all attempts to travel even between the Milky Way and our closest galactic neighbour (the two Magellanic Clouds) have met with total failure. He posits that a race that has completely dominated their own galaxy may have ...


23

As explained on the Wikipedia article, there has not been a movie. The reasons why a movie has not been made for a book or series generally (including this case) come down to one thing: money -- or more specifically, a lack thereof. The Foundation series appears to be in what is often called development hell, characterized by repeated (failed or stalled) ...


23

From the official Ian Gillan website Hello Tamas, ... Yes, The Mule was inspired by Asimov. It's been a while but I'm sure you've made the right connection...Asimov was required reading in the 60's.


22

The opening to Foundation (where Gaal Dornick arrives on Trantor) states that everyone on Trantor is agoraphobic due to never seeing the open sky. The world-city is kilometers deep, and nobody wants windows. But its not exactly underground, its just that "ground level" has ceased to be a useful concept. The only green space is around the Emperor's palace: ...


22

Jumps indeed are limited in distance. Near Trantor, they are extremely limited. The stars were as thick as weeds in an unkempt field, and for the first time, Lathan Devers found the figures to the right of the decimal point of prime importance in calculating the cuts through the hyper-regions. There was a claustrophobic sensation about the necessity for ...


20

Comporellon Comporellon, originally Baleyworld, was a planet near Gaia and Sayshell that was renowned for its particularly old age. It was founded by the second wave of space colonists, known as the Settlers, and thus had a very superstitious attitude toward the first wave, the Spacers. They were also superstitious about Earth. Golan Trevize, ...


17

You can see the "Spaceship-and-Sun" logo on this 1991 book cover for "Prelude to Foundation" And if you squint, you can also see it on the cover of the 1991 edition of "Foundation and Empire". Since both books were produced during Asimov's lifetime, we can reasonably assume that he would have viewed and approved both cover images. As mentioned by @...


16

There are certainly technological issues at work here. However, I suggest that those issues only exist because the robots have thus far suppressed any technology that would solve them. See Richard's quote from Foundation's Edge. It speaks directly about threats from intergalactic civilizations. Also in Foundation's Edge, we learn that the robots, Daneel ...


16

Out of universe, it is worth mentioning that the several Foundation instances were not a single work, but created & sold separately to SF magazines (so, the first Foundation book was actually five different stories in the same universe). Foundation and Empire, likewise, were two different long stories, (The general & The mule). So, it is probably ...


15

In Chapter 17 of 'Foundation's Edge', one of the Gaians ("Dom") tells a fable to Trevize and Pelorat. Here's an abridged version: We have a tale about that — a fable, perhaps. I cannot vouch for its authenticity. In fact, on the face of it, it sounds like fiction. [...] I was about to tell our guests the story of Eternity. [...] the fable states that ...


13

Wikipedia is quoting a specific list that appears in Prelude to Foundation, which was published in 1988. Forward the Foundation wasn't published until five years later, and presumably hadn't been written yet when that list was printed.


12

According to Isaac Asimov: Yes Asimov did indeed believe that Star Wars was influenced by Foundation, and has said so several times; in an introduction in 1983: I modeled my “Galactic Empire” (a phrase I think I was the first to use) quite consciously on the Roman Empire. Ever since then, other science fiction writers have been following the fashion, and ...


12

I haven't read the book in a long time, and my answer is largely speculative. You're talking about 20th- and 21st-century cancer therapy. There's no reason to assume that cancer therapy in Seldon's time would cause hair loss. I don't recall any mention of cancer in any of the Foundation series; perhaps it no longer exists or is easily treatable without ...


12

What "actually" happened is that the First Foundation concluded that the Second Foundation was located on Terminus. One of the main bits of evidence leading to this conclusion is an enigmatic comment by Hari Seldon that he founded another Foundation (other than "Encyclopedia Galactica Publishing Foundation #1") at "Star's End". No one knows what "Star's End"...


11

Right now, the rights for a Foundation series of films have been given to Roland Emmerich and he plans to get to development on them after his next movie. It seems he is planning a CGI/3D opus (ala Avatar) and will likely over-convolute the story with action and special effects =/


11

This is not Asimov, but Dickson, and not in the Foundation series. (I originally thought it was in the Childe Cycle series, but that was wrong.) Otherwise, you remembered it perfectly :) The story is Call Him Lord. Near the end, it's as you describe: Kyle's throat ached and was dry as ashes. "Lord," he answered, "he was a coward." The hand dropped ...


10

The major theme I've always picked up from the original trilogy is: "The flow of Humanity is too large to be consciously changed by any (normal) single individual or group. Instead, it is large social movements that shape history." You can see it in the early days of the Foundation, where they manipulated the social structure around them (with the help of ...


10

Well, it's explained in the later novels (characters basically do recaps on previous Seldon Crisis situations, as well as their solutions), so I don't want to spoil it too much for you. In each case, as per Seldon's design, the answer is almost inevitable. I haven't read them in a few years, but as I recall, the first few crisis points: (Headers to remind ...


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