31

Chapter 23 discusses the genetic situation as a method of discovering why magic appears to be getting less powerful. In later chapters he concludes that the simplistic genetic marker is used as a method for whatever causes magic to work to recognize a person as capable of being answered. It is as if there is a computer that actually performs the magic when ...


25

If you assume that Harry is correct, then a Wizard/Squib cross could have either Wizard or Squib offspring, at 50% each; you don't need a Wizard/Muggle cross to get Squibs. However, two Wizards could not produce anything other than Wizards, as you point out. There's a reason that I emphasized the initial phrase in this answer, however - and if you consider ...


24

The wizarding community is a small pool, and Parseltongue is a rarely-used skill. If Slytherin's descendents were marrying into the general community, then you would expect them to grow in number over the last thousand years. But that may not be the case; remember that: Slytherin's last known descendants are the Gaunt family. When Dumbledore introduces ...


23

Hmmm. I don't think genetics work differently in Westeros. What's more important is how the characters of Westeros perceive genetics to work. As the book demonstrates, every Baratheon child previously has had the typical dark Baratheon features, and so it is not a stretch for the characters of this world to suppose that he cannot be a true Baratheon based on ...


14

Not necessarily. There can be muggle offspring from a wizard-muggle couple, but such cases are rare. So, the probability isn't 50%. The magic gene dominates in most of cases. Those muggle children are called Squibs. From the linked Harry Potter Wikia page: A Squib, also known as a wizard-born, is a non-magical person who is born to at least one magical ...


11

Other than Herpo the Foul and Paracelsus (who could themselves have been ancestors/descendants of Slytherin), all known Parselmouths are indeed direct descendants of Slytherin. We also know that by the time of the HP series, Voldemort is the last surviving descendant of Slytherin. So we don't need to mess around talking about eldest sons: even if all ...


11

Pretty sure that is Piers Anthony's Race against Time (1973). Some details to help verify: He lives in a town which is done to LOOK like Nebraska, but isn't. He has a dog that seems to have capabilities beyond what a dog should have. Adults are actually a medium color, but spray themselves to appear Caucasian (in his area. Different colors are used in the ...


10

If we are talking about gene crossing, as in Mendelian model, then there is something wrong about that chapter 7. I did not read the mentioned fanfiction, so... Let's science. This is scientifically accepted approach to how parental genes work. Based on this model, you would have to define a dominant allele. In your question, this would be being Squib or ...


9

"Super Gyro" by Grey Rollins Review from Stranger than SF: Linus works in a gyro shop. When gunmen hold them up, a few customers try and fail to use their genetically enhanced powers to overpower the criminals. Linus, with no power, must outthink the gunmen and take them down.


8

In Hero of Ages, Sazed's notes explain that before the rise of the Lord Ruler, mistings existed, but not mistborns. The first mistborns were created by the Lord Ruler by ingesting pieces of Preservation's body. Somehow, this power was transferable through lineage (genetics are not necessarily involved) and, as a thousand years passed, its strength decreased. ...


8

Ira Levin's (Rosemary's Baby) "This Perfect Day" (1970) is a dystopian novel with the hero Li RM35M4419, nicknamed "Chip" (as in "chip off the old block") by his nonconformist grandfather Jan, is a typical child Member who, through a mistake in genetic programming, has one green eye. Through his grandfather's encouragement, he learns how to play a ...


8

You are correct that a Baratheon child could have been born with blonde hair. What made Ned really suspicious was the fact that Robert had quite a few bastards here and there, and every single one of them strongly resembled Robert (the father) and not the mother, especially in the hair and the eyes, whereas Robert's 'legitimate' looked nothing like him. ...


7

Heterochromia definitely exists sometimes on Roshar. It seems to occur occasionally when a lighteyed and darkeyed person have a child. In Words of Radiance we meet Redin. (source with spoilers:) He is the illegitimate son of a light eyed man and a darkeyed woman. He does not seem to be considered noble and gets confused reactions from people due to his ...


7

Not much Magical abilities appear to be genetically inherited Well, they are certainly inherited. Rowling has called it a "gene," but given that she is not a scientist (or mathematician), she may be using the term in the colloquial sense of "something that is inherited," rather than "a distinct sequence of nucleotides forming part of a chromosome, the ...


7

It’s unclear if pure-bloods are generally more skilled. There are no clearly objective statements in the Harry Potter series on whether pure-bloods are generally more skilled than wizards with less or no magical ancestry, but it is possible. Magic itself is an inherited trait, so it seems possible that having more wizards in the bloodline could mean that ...


7

There is no mention of twelve-stranded DNA in the book. Cheela biology is described in some technical detail: The cheela biophysicists would not determine the genetic coding mechanism for the cheela for dozens of generations, but when they did, both they and the humans would be surprised at how different it was. Because of the high temperatures on the ...


6

Just in case the comment gets lost, andrewsi suggested Ian McDonald's Chaga (also known as Evolution's Shore). Optimistic near-future alien-contact yarn from the Ireland resident author of the gloomy The Broken Land (1992), etc. In 2003, Saturn's moon Hyperion unaccountably vanishes, while large meteorites strike Earth's tropic regions. As a result, Kenya'...


6

I am going to bring up what the writer himself has brought up when asked about this: There is indeed one critical location, as the Mendelian pattern shows pretty strongly - from a Bayesian perspective, it's significantly more likely to show up if there's a single critical location, and that's by far the simplest explanation for what shows up. Harry ...


5

The only way for this to work would be for magic to be recessive on one gene and then another, unrelated, gene that can prevent someone who should be otherwise able to cast from doing so. So two genes. One recessive for a positive trait (Wizardry : W) and the other recessive for a negative trait (Squibness : S). I will follow the usual genetic notation ...


4

Gladiator, by Philip Wylie. The story begins at the turn of the 20th century. Professor Abednego Danner lives in a small, rural Colorado town, and has a somewhat unhappy marriage to a conservative religious woman. Obsessed with unlocking genetic potential, Danner experiments with a tadpole (which breaks through the bowl he's keeping it in), and a pregnant ...


4

This remains a mystery. From the script all you get is that Hanna's DNA is manipulated beyond what is possible in the human genome. What it does never gets determined but for what capacities Hanna shows in the movie and of course the expectations Marissa and Erik have. Some snippets: MILITARY DOCTOR 2 It’s contaminated. Run it again. ... INT. ...


3

Assuming Harry's genetic model to be correct, there are at least two ways in which a Squib could be born into a wizard family. One is that the Squib's biological father might have in fact been a Muggle; so far as I'm aware, wizards do not have paternity tests. The other is a deleterious mutation in one of the two magical genes, causing it to become non-...


3

Koban series by Stephen W Bennett Koban (2012) The Krall have used thousands of years of combat to select the genes of the strongest and fastest warriors. They are a species determined to dominate the galaxy, through annihilation or enslavement of every opponent. Koban is an uninhabited high gravity planet with impossibly fast savage animals, which ...


3

Having a magical parent does not guarantee magical abilities. Not only is there a term for the Muggle children of a magical and non-magical parent (Squib), but there are several examples of such in the canon. Gilderoy Lockhart. Quoting from the “Early Life” section of his Pottermore entry: Born to a witch mother and a Muggle father, with two older ...


3

The key point you are missing is that Ned (and Jon Arryn before him) had discovered that every offspring of a Baratheon and a Lannister, the child was dark-haired, thus proving that the Baratheon hair was dominant and showing that none of Cersei's children were Robert's.


3

Assume the gene for Parseltongue is dominant. From a genetic standpoint, it will only be passed down on average to half of Slytherin's descendants (other than those who get two copies of the gene through interbreeding). If the number of children per generation of Slytherin descendants averages about two, there would be no increase in the number of ...


3

No. It's Explicit in Chamber of Secrets. “It’s about the most insulting thing he could think of,” gasped Ron, coming back up. “Mudblood’s a really foul name for someone who is Muggle-born — you know, non-magic parents. There are some wizards — like Malfoy’s family — who think they’re better than everyone else because they’re what people call pure-...


3

No. Question: If two Elantrians had a baby, would he be an Elantrian too? Brandon Sanderson: What a good question. The answer is no, actually. There's actually a character in the books who's an Elantrian who did become an Elantrian whose parents were connected to Elantris, but that was seen as something that didn't always happen. Source


2

This scene was simplified for the show. In the books, Eddard looks through the book at all previous children born from a Baratheon father and a Lannister mother (it may have been Lannister father and Baratheon mother as well) throughout the entire history recorded in that particular book. Every one of them was born with the Baratheon brown hair. This is ...


2

Muggleborns have a distant magical relative, usually a squib who married a muggle. This is a quote from Harry Potter wiki: Muggle-borns inherit magic from a distant ancestor; they are descended from Squibs who have married Muggles and whose families had lost the knowledge of their wizarding legacy. The magic resurfaces unexpectedly many generations later. ...


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