57

First, let's establish that at least some male characters do have nipples in The Original Series : Given what we see above, it's certainly not a general policy on TOS to have no nipples. With that out of the way, we can focus on the appearance of the Greek god Apollo. Here he is in a larger, better screen capture: There are nipples here; they are ...


48

Yes, "Thanos" is indeed derived from the name "Thanatos", the name of the Freudian concept of death drive (which in turn is named after the Thanatos of myth), according to Vulture: While attending a psychology class in junior college in order to woo a woman, Starlin had become briefly acquainted with the Freudian concept of Thanatos, ...


15

I'm reasonably sure this is actually one of the Norse Eddas, the source tales that deal with Thor, the God of Thunder and his antics. Thor's Journey to the Land of the Giants features all of the aspects you're talking about as well as the twist ending. I have deluded thee with vain shows; first in the forest, where I met you, and where you were unable ...


14

This story is told in one of the books that The Song of Achilles is based upon, Homer's Odyssey. Note that Odysseus is referred to as 'Ulysses' in this version. Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going to wash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hot till the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ...


9

Wayward Sons: Legends. I enjoyed reading that webcomic -- all of it that was online at the time -- several years ago. I just now checked, and confirmed that it's still on hiatus. Its most recent page (if you follow the link) says it will be returning "Late in 2015." Obviously, that hasn't happened. The basic premise is just as you recall. The good guys (...


7

Might his be Atlantis Found (1997) by R. Garcia Y. Robertson, the second book in the The Virgin and the Dinosaur duology...? In this sequel to "The Virgin and the Dinosaur", Jake Bento time travels in the Bronze Age, hoping to locate a lost time-traveling expedition. He is shocked to discover that his employers are masquerading as gods, enslaving ...


6

This sounds like Laptop of the Gods by Peter Chippindale, published in 1998. One other plot detail that I remember: The protagonist Cupid/Eros accidentally alters history and creates Bill Gates while illegally accessing Mercury/Hermes' account on the mainframe of the gods.


5

I think it's an exaggeration. Heracles killed Cycnus and Diomedes, and maybe Hippolyta, depending on your sources. And Ares fathered something like 50 children, so that's not even very many of them.


4

The story of Icarus is a myth, and myths are more than just supernatural stories that explain phenomena in the world. They characteristically comment on universals, or archetypes, and the Icarus myth uses narrative (poetic narrative, yes, but still a story, or narrative) to discuss the concepts of boundaries and limitations. In this story, we see both the ...


4

Well, if you consider Chaos as God, then Chaos. Otherwise, all together Gaia, Eros, Erebus and Nyx: In Greek mythology, Chaos (Greek: Χάος), according to Hesiod, Chaos ("Chasm") was the first thing to exist: "at first Chaos came to be" (or was) "but next" (possibly out of Chaos) came Gaia, Tartarus, and Eros (elsewhere the son of Aphrodite). ...


3

I haven't read them, but this sounds like "The Last Argonauts" trilogy of graphic novels. I struggled to find a description that better matches the criteria, but what I did find does fit. One day, the Gods stopped talking to Men, abandoning them to disasters and despair. Only one man can complete the quest that will restore the balance of the world: ...


3

Could this be Narcissus? Whilst he was not exactly a suicide or ritual sacrifice, he did fall in love with his own reflection in a pool, and drowned in an effort to get to it. The mutual suicide may be a reference to Echo


3

Mal is from Shadow, which was destroyed by Alliance forces. Apparently this invoved a very thorough "scorched earth" programme, which literally burned the entire planet turning it into a "black rock" like the one Miranda was said to be.


2

Take my love, take my land Take me where I cannot stand I don't care, I'm still free You can't take the sky from me Take me out to the black Tell them I ain't comin' back Burn the land and boil the sea You can't take the sky from me There's no place I can be Since I found Serenity But you can't take the sky from me... Those are the lyrics, and I would say ...


2

In Greek mythology, Titans were not supposed to be beasts. They were just like the Olympian gods but they came before and actually gave birth to the Olympian gods. None of the movies or shows that you mentioned are accurate because they were all shown as some sort of scary monsters. Not all of the Titans were actually evil. The Greek god Zeus dethroned his ...


2

This is addressed in the back-story provided in the opening voiceover. In Immortals, the 'Titans' aren't the progenitors of the Gods, they're simply another faction of immortal beings who originally dwelled in the 'Heavens' alongside each other. These two sets of immortal beings fell out (for reasons not given, but clearly fashion-related), and a vast war ...


2

If you have not read percy jackson and the greek gods and the greek gods, in which it is mentioned that dionyus was a half blood but due to his creation of wine he got many followers who worshipped him like god because of which he turned into a real god (in greek mythology more worshippers the gods get the stronger they become). Also in the same book ...


1

Googling the terms of your question brought me to this site, which speaks of rivers which require sacrifice at regular intervals, thought by some to be remnants of old Celtic rituals. The article I linked to argues that it is more likely that it is just a common way to bring meaning to deaths happening in the rivers at fairly regular intervals, and not ...


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