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2

Looks like user14111's answer has the right book, but maybe the multiple universes were from something else. Your question reminded me of Diaspora by Greg Egan. In it a group of two post-human entities don't so much create universes as find a way to open windows into them. The universes have different laws of physics and they figure out ways to build ...


4

As noted by Otis and agreed by the OP, this appears to be Twistor (1989) by John G. Cramer. (Note that the author's name in the previous answer is incorrect.) The book has had a number of different cover designs; you can view them on ISFDb. One of the better synopses reads: David Harrison, a young physicist at the University of Washington, accidentally ...


33

Cosm, a 1998 novel by Gregory Benford. is at least a partial match. As I recall, the main character is a black woman physicist, working at a collider, who accidentally creates a universe, sneaks it out of the lab and takes it home with her. I don't recall the part about her making more universes, but then I don't think I read the whole book. I'll see if I ...


7

The question thus far is extremely light on plot details, but the dichotomy between long-lived space-dwellers and short-lived (and technologically less-advanced) planet dwellers makes me think of Between the Strokes of Night (1985) by Charles Sheffield. It fits with the "hard SF" tag because there is no FTL in the universe; the space-dwellers' long life-...


5

I found it. It was called Mara's Shadow by Darci Stone in the Writers of the Future Volume 34 anthology. The science behind the story forms around a group of scientists working on solving an unknown disease. The facts don’t seem to add correctly with everything they know. As more and more people contract symptoms, it becomes evident that the disease is ...


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