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3

The writers and director claim that they didn't know about the TARDIS. To decide whether that is plausible or not, it is worth considering the differences between the two: The Doctor's TARDIS is not a public phone box - it is a British Police box. The time machine in Bill & Ted is based on a regular public phone box. The telephone on a Police box is ...


8

Co-writer Chris Matheson claims that neither he, nor co-writer Ed Solomon nor the film's director Stephen Herek (who suggested the phone box) knew anything about Doctor Who. “Rufus was originally their friend,” reveals Matheson of Bill and Ted’s time-travel mentor, played cooly by comedian George Carlin. “He was a 27-year-old high school junior and ...


-2

One could argue that Tolkien's Orcs were the first Dark Elves, given that they used to be elves, and all other traits apply (except maybe for the clans).


6

As reported by some users in the comments of this question, even if in Tolkien's Legendarium there is not a whole race of typical fantasy "Dark Elves", there are some single individual characters with particular traits, and some places, that could have served as inspirations for the later archetype as popularized in example by the AD&D's Drow. Eöl: He ...


1

AD&D's Drow race also draws heavily on Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melibone series. Elric, along with some of the other characters from the Melibonean mythos, were featured in the original edition of the Deities & Demigods rulebook.


5

1946: "Loophole", a short story by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in Astounding Science Fiction, April 1946, available at the Internet Archive. From Wikipedia summary: The story begins in the form of correspondence between the President of Mars and the Secretary of the Martian Council of Scientists, regarding the discovery of atomic power (in the form ...


3

A very early (1947) example of a story that turns out to have a lot to do with the consequences of an early nuclear explosion (although it was the Trinity test in New Mexico, not one of the bombs dropped on Japan in 1945) is "The Figure" by Edward Grendon (a pseudonym for the psychologist Lawrence LeShan). It didn't make the newspapers, but about a year ...


2

Possibly Alfred Bester's "Hobson's Choice" 1952 It involves a government agent in a post-WW3 America sent to a place where, inexplicably, the population has risen. He finds that the growth is due to the arrival of time-travellers from the future. He wants to leave his devastated world, but they caution him that he will be even more unhappy in the totally ...


49

The first example of the "dark elves" as a distinct dark-skinned, subterranean, evil sub-race of elves may actually be their appearance in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Prior to that, "dark elf" was largely just used as a synonym for evil creatures characteristic of Nordic/Germanic folklore; there was no particular distinction between the Döckálfar (...


59

The origin of the dark elf / light elf trope can be traced back as far as the 13th century, where Dökkálfar (dark elves)and Ljósálfar (light elves) are mentioned in the Prose (or Young) Edda by Snorri Sturluson. Here, the Ljósálfar are described as "fairer than the sun to look at", while the Dökkálfar are "blacker than pitch". It is unclear whether the ...


6

It is too in the Volume 1 (1962-1965) of « Little Annie Fanny » in the story from december 1964 called « Astronaut Annie » published originally in Playboy.


18

In March 1912, the short story "Under the Moons of Mars" appeared in All-Story Magazine. The first of Edgar Rice Burroughs's Barsoom stories, this was the initial installment of the novel A Princess of Mars. Chased by Indians into a cave in the Arizona wilderness, Virginia soldier turned gold prospector John Carter grows lethargic and is suddenly ...


3

Over the years 1937 and 1938, E. E. "Doc" Smith serialized Galactic Patrol, the first (published) book of the Lensman series. One character in the series, Mentor (and, by extension, his race of Arisians) demonstrated the ability to teleport, traveling at the speed of thought. I'm not certain it was ever made fully clear that Arisians traveled in body, but ...


5

The earliest I know of is "The World of Null A" by A.E. van Vogt. It was published in three parts in a magazine in 1945, and as a novel in 1948 Gilbert Gosseyn is the central character of the story. He has a mysterious past, and is himself not aware of the fact that he doesn't know where he came from. He has many adventures while trying to discover his ...


26

I believe that it didn't originate in a work of fantasy, but rather in religion. Concretely, in Christianity, Satan was called the Prince of Darkness. This appears in Paradise Lost, by John Milton, and is thought to derive from the Latin term princeps tenebrarum. This latter term, however, is sufficiently ambiguous, despite being the origin of the modern ...


15

I found an occurrence of "dark lord" in The Lord of the Dark Red Star: being the story of the supernatural influences in the life of an Italian despot in the thirteenth century (1903) by Eugene Lee-Hamilton. The precise phrase "dark lord" only actually occurs once in the book, spoken by a witch addressing the devil: "O Lord, dark Lord," she said, "I ...


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