40

The Moriarty program shows that the Enterprise computer can emulate a sentient human with genius-level intelligence on command. That doesn't mean the computer itself is sentient. If "sentient personality" is simply a type of program which can be run, and the computer doesn't happen to be running that program, the computer is not sentient. In terms of the (...


40

From the TNG Technical Manual; Matter conversion subsystem creates physical props using replicators. Replicated props are generally created when an object is likely to be touched by the participant. Some props are animated under computer control by precision-guided tractor beams. Holographic imagery subsystem creates three-dimensional images ...


36

The holodecks on Voyager run on an independent power source. This can be seen in the season five episode Night, when main power is suppressed yet the holodeck continues to run. For whatever reason, this power source doesn't appear to require any significant amount of fuel: SEVEN: Independent subsystems are operational. Environmental controls, holodecks. ...


34

Jake Sisko Ben and Jennifer Sisko have a different marriage / separation timeline in the Mirror universe, and Jake does not have a Mirror counterpart. Appearances list: (listed as 71 appearances) Reference: "Jake Sisko", Memory Alpha (note: Jake was not 'impersonated' by an alien, but was possessed by a wormhole alien, but all the characters knew it was ...


26

No: the reason that warp core breaches can damage ships is that they release a huge amount of energy in a very short time. However, there is presumably a maximum power output for the holographic emitters of the holo-deck which would be much lower, firstly because there is simply no need to use that much energy for it and secondly because otherwise ...


25

At some point in the evolution of life on Earth, sentient beings evolved from nonsentient ones. The only difference between that and the Enterprise computer creating a sentient entity is that the latter was done by deliberate intent, but both cases involve sentient beings arising from non-sentient origins.


21

I think you've misread the scene. Data is trying to replicate his emotional state. At the beginning of the scene the holodeck safeties are on. He asks the computer to make the Borg stronger and it refuses for safety reasons, presumably on the grounds that making the drone super-strong could result in severe injury. Data asks Geordi to help him reset the ...


19

Main Canon Within the main canon, Moriarty's "ship in a bottle" is never mentioned again after TNG: Ship in a Bottle, although the events of the episode (as an instructive warning) do receive a very brief and tangential reference in VOY: Alter Ego CHAKOTAY: Most likely a sentient computer programme. I checked the Starfleet database. This kind of ...


18

Yes, smells can be created The Holodeck does work via photon manipulation and force fields, but it also uses actual matter: A holodeck combines elements of transporter technology with that of replicators, by generating actual matter, as well as projecting force fields to give the objects the illusion of substance. (Source) Replication was only used for ...


18

Picard, in the TNG episode "The Big Goodbye" confirmed that the holodeck can indeed create odours: PICARD: From that window, I could see an entire, er DATA: City block. PICARD: That's right. Sounds, Smells. CRUSHER: You make it sound so real. PICARD: That's how it felt.


18

In terms of historical personages actually seen on screen we have; Albert Einstein, Sir Isaac Newton, Stephen Hawking (TNG: Descent) Sigmund Freud (TNG: Phantasms) Leonardo Da Vinci (VOY: Scorpion, VOY: Concerning Flight, etc) Mahatma Gandhi, Lord Byron, Socrates (VOY: Darkling)


17

With an omni-directional treadmill! They can already do that today!


16

This issue was specifically addressed in the "Star Trek : Voyager Technical Manual" handed out to potential scriptwriters for the Voyager series. Simply put; Anything that people are likely to interact with (props, food, clothing, etc) is created by using a matter-replicator. Anything that visitors are unlikely to interact with (or that doesn't ...


15

Essentially, there's no difference in terms of the technology. The implication is that a holosuite is smaller and can accomodate one or two people (in a small simulation) whereas a holodeck is a larger space that can accomodate dozens of people. Additionally, a holodeck is a dedicated space with built-in equipment whereas a holosuite (at least the DS9 ...


15

The implication is that the holodeck's replicator isn't capable of creating food-quality molecules. Don't forget that the point is to occasionally replicate something that will pass for a casual tactile and visual sensation rather than a high quality molecule that can be eaten and digested. While there are occasions (such as in Voy: Day of Honor) when food ...


15

Jokingly - The ship computer Star Treks' original series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, and Voyager all have one actor in common: Majel Barrett-Roddenberry (wife of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry) Always the voice of the ship, even when the ship wasn't a ship (hologram, mind game, recreation, etc). Slightly more serious would be Lwaxana Troi....


15

Real world reason, at that point the writers and audience had several years of the term "holosuite" being used and it would be habitual, unlike an early episode where everyone would be more used to the term "holodeck". In-universe answer, at that point O'Brien had been on DS9 several years where the word "holosuite" was used and ...


14

Off the top of my head, I can see a number of technical difficulties; Disruptions to power Spaceships in the Star Trek universe (even those not engaged in exploration) seem to regularly encounter fields and anomalies that can disrupt power systems. On a normal ship, this is already quite serious but with a holo-ship it would be instantly fatal to the crew. ...


14

Guinan Not only has Guinan never (afaik) appeared on a holodeck as a hologram, when we see parallel universes (like in Yesterday's Enterprise), she is the only one aware that the universe has changed, and retains the memory of those events as well.


13

Yes and no, depending on the status of the holodeck's in-built safety systems. Safeties off : This one is pretty simple. We know from the TNG episode "Encounter at Farpoint" and Star Trek: Generations that the water on the holodeck is often replicated (i.e. real), rather than simulated with force fields. In the unlikely event that the holodeck safety ...


13

Thanks to the episode Ship in a Bottle we know that it is possible to remove the program for a sentient computer program from a holodeck and run it in an external processing unit. The real problem would be that no sophisticated android bodies exist in the Federation, during the time of The Next Generation, outside the seven Soong-type androids. Of those: ...


13

According to Voyager’s Message in a Bottle episode, holodeck technology works so that the data of the program object is embedded in the object. So the program contains its one and only instance. To use an analogy of RAM memory, holograms reside either in RAM or in storage. They cannot be in both. Why this is was never explained. I don't remember exactly, ...


13

Taking the novelisation for TNG: Descent into account, it would seem that Geordi isn't fooled by the holodeck one bit. He can choose to see the spectrum that will allow him to perceive them, but at the same time he also sees that they have neither true form nor true substance, describing the place as little better than a cartoon. Geordi saw through the ...


12

It is a memorial and a (relatively) static image, as opposed to an interactive holographic display. Obviously, the Holodeck could create a fully-realistic hologram of Tasha Yar. Deep Space Nine has show us that this could be incredibly realistic, if the holodeck had the right data. That said, her being transparent must have been a decision. It seems that ...


12

The episode you're talking about is "Once Upon a Time"--from the transcript here: JANEWAY: Just checking on my future Captain's Assistant. NEELIX: Right now, she's off to conquer a giant beetle. JANEWAY: Oh, sounds like a dangerous mission. NEELIX: She can handle it. JANEWAY: She's a courageous girl. Did I ever tell you about the ...


11

There actually is a very practical reason for the holodecks to have an independent power source, The EMH. It's true that the Doctor was originally an emergency program, but one would have to assume that if you have an EMH program, it's expected to run primarily when there is a major emergency. Such emergencies require more space than just the infirmary. ...


11

Not directly in TNG In Conundrum, we see: Dr. Beverly Crusher tending to Kristin, a crewmember injured cliff-diving on the holodeck that holodeck program was Holodeck Program 47-C. So, although we don't observe it in TNG, we assume that in TNG the holodek could manipulate gravity with this program, otherwise Kristin would've fallen straight to the ...


11

As several other answers have explained, it is implausible for the holographic emitters which drive the holodeck to emit the energy levels which correspond to a warp core breach. Warp core breaches are matter/antimatter annihilation events, and therefore ridiculously energetic even by astronomical standards. However, the question has now broadened to ...


11

The holograms on the holodeck aren't only projections. The holodeck also uses technology similar to the transporters and replicators in order to give its illusions substance. This is why people can physically interact with the holodeck programs rather than passing through holograms. The resulting substance is known as holodeck matter, which is different from ...


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