35

From Voyager "Basics": SESKA: Hello, everyone. What do you think of your son, Chakotay? He has your eyes, don't you think? Thank goodness he doesn't look too human. You all have such weak foreheads.


29

Though not exactly what you're looking for, Riker's lack of Rubber Prosthesis Head is remarked upon when he is outed as a Human in the TNG episode "First Contact": BEREL: You're in no condition to leave yet. There are several unusual things about your case, Mister Jakara. Your cranial lobes, for instance, they seem to be surgical implants. RIKER: I ...


21

Because Data's purpose was to be more than the sum of his programming The Memory Alpha page on Data contains a few useful pieces of information: "I chose to believe that I was a person, that I had the potential to become more than a collection of circuits and sub-processors." – Data, 2369 ("Rightful Heir") and Data asserted that he did not only ...


20

First of all, as is often the case, Wikia is WRONG, when it says "Force-sensitive humanoid alien". This is clear when you dig into the article, where they explain why it's worded thusly: "Snoke was a humanoid alien who was leader of the Attendants, a retinue composed of mute alien navigators who originated from the Unknown Regions". The actual canon ...


19

There's a very thorough answer from Wikipedia that should answer your question: Significant to the plot is the premise that the Doctor is half-human, "on [his] mother's side". This fact has proved extremely controversial among series' fans. The issue was referenced a number of times in the BBC books featuring the Eighth Doctor, which either seek to ...


15

I'm not so sure most aliens would view humans as "plain". Remember that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. To a ferengi, large ears, mis-aligned teeth, and large forehead bumps are plain. Their society evolved viewing that as what is standard or plain. So to come across a hairy ape with small ears would be quite a shock at first, and would certainly not ...


15

In the books and the films, the Oompa-Loompas have always been human. However, their illustrated appearance has changed over time. The book "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" was first published in 1964. Space/time travel elements such as aliens were not really introduced into the series until the book "Charlie and the Glass Elevator". According to ...


12

“Able to be indistinguishable” is highly debatable here*, it's not actually science fiction† and the word “robot” does not turn up in this text‡. But if we allow this work at all, then it may well be the earliest appearance: Oʟɪᴍᴘɪᴀ from E.T.A. Hoffmann's 1816 short story Der Sandmann. *The protagonist is in ...


8

One of the earliest Sci-Fi movies with that theme is Fritz Lang's Metropolis, wherein one of the main characters is duplicated in appearance using a robot. Dates to 1927. In this one, the robot is in fact made to look exactly like the human character. Wikipedia: Metropolis (film)


7

This an interesting question because much about that movie has been discarded and ignored however Paul McGann is still listed as the Eight Doctor so it's not completely out of canon. I think over all though this has been ignored and can be explained away by Rule 1: The Doctor lies After all it has long been canon that the doctor can only regenerate 12 ...


7

The canon answer is no. Per the (fully Disney canon) Star Wars Made Easy factbook, the "humans" we see in the Star Wars universe are definitively not biologically related to humans from Earth. ARE THE HUMANS THERE "US"? You mean, did they come from Earth and have our history? No, they're in a galaxy far, far away—I thought we covered this! These ...


6

Possibly the 1970 film Skullduggery, based on a novel by "Vercors" variously titled but in English generally called You Shall Know Them. I haven't seen the movie nor read the novel, but from my memory of having read reviews of both in the past it sounds like a possibility. Someone who has seen the movie can perhaps elaborate. On an expedition in Papua ...


6

What you are describing appears to be Transit by Edmund Cooper (1964). A synopsis from goodreads.com: Plot: Richard Avery is on auto-pilot after his one true love dies young of cancer. He gets whisked off by a mysterious someone, and plopped on a planet with three other people. We get, that start a 'Robinson Crusoe in space', but it turns out that ...


5

This might be "Humanoids from the Deep" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080904/ PLOT SUMMARIZATION: Scientific experiments backfire and produce horrific mutations: half man, half fish, which terrorize a small fishing village by killing the men and raping the women.


5

Could this be Wavelength from 1983? Two young lovers learn that a small group of child-like space aliens are marooned on Earth and are being held prisoner at a top secret military facility. The couple then decide to liberate the extraterrestrial castaways and help them make a rendezvous with a rescue ship sent from the alien home planet.


5

I'm going to guess at Evolution (2004) by Stephen Baxter. Per Amazon Stretching from the distant past into the remote future, from primordial Earth to the stars, Evolution is a soaring symphony of struggle, extinction, and survival; a dazzling epic that combines a dozen scientific disciplines and a cast of unforgettable characters to convey the grand ...


5

I don't know if you're still looking for the answer to this question, but I believe the short story you're looking for is "The Real Thing" by Alison Goodman. The story focuses on the slightly genetically enhanced Joss Aaronson and her psychically-bonded alien partner Mavkel. It was included in the short story anthology Firebirds Rising, edited by Sharyn ...


5

Sounds like the West of Eden trilogy by Harry Harrison.


4

Though I can't find a direct quote in the book, Wikipedia refers to them as "pygmy like men", so I am assuming they are humans. Roald Dahl originally referred to them as black African pygmys, but then later changed it to creatures from Oompaland to prevent any racial accusations. So I would say that they are human, but just from oompaland, a mythical place.


4

In Star Trek: Generations, Lursa and Betor Duras make several remarks on the smoothness of human's features. The subject in question was, I believe, dr. Crusher, and her face was described as 'weak and ugly'.


4

I'm almost certain that this is Origin by Stephen Baxter. The planet to which the modern humans were transported was a red moon, which had replaced Earth's original moon. The slavers were referred to as "zealots" and they appeared to be modern humans, but it is later revealed that they still have tails. The less advanced hominids were referred to as "hams"...


4

As confirmed by the OP in a comment, this refers to "The People" stories by Zenna Henderson. ... her series concerning the history of "The People", humanoid beings from a faraway planet who are forced to emigrate to Earth when their home world is destroyed by a natural disaster. Scattered mostly throughout the American Southwest during their landing ...


3

Sounds like Starliner from David Drake. The four armed (but six dugged) aliens are just a side story. The main story is about a star voyage just as war is breaking out between two of the planets it will land on during the trip. The ship is on a circular route between Earth and several of the larger colonies and independent worlds. Its sister ship/...


2

I can't be sure, but the evidence indicates that they are really human. Pablo Hidalgo is in charge of maintaining the coherence of canon in Star Wars following the Disney acquisition. According to him, speaking of Depa Billaba: Chalactan is a culture and heritage. She is biologically human. We should assume that Pablo Hidalgo means "human" in its usual ...


2

Lester Del Rey's "Helen O'Loy" (1938) beats out Evidence by a few years.


1

This sounds a lot like the Riverworld stories by Phillip José Farmer. Not conclusively so, but the resurrections from different eras is a strong link. As the Wikipedia article shows, Farmer set several novels and short stories there.


1

In "Enterprise" humans are often referred to as "pink skins" by the Andorians. It's often used with a derogatory tone. In later episodes the phrase is used as a form of endearment after many successful encounters with the Andorians. It's how they perceived Humans, generally, as being different (and more to the point that our most prominent feature to at ...


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