53

The hyperdrive wasn't broken, it was damaged. It had sufficient (insert technobabble here) to get them to a nearby system. This is explained in the film's script RIC OLIE : There's not enough power to get us to Coruscant...the hyperdrive is leaking. QUI-GON : We'll have to land somewhere to refuel and repair the ship. and in more detail in the ...


51

According to wookieepedia's Millennium Falcon article (check the technical specifications table on the right) It was retconned by adding a backup class 10 Hyperdrive, which is extraordinarily slow, to the technical specifications of the Millennium Falcon. the source of this information is Dark Force Rising Sourcebook, a supplement to Star Wars: The ...


48

Yes, they can, if they have an exit vector. In ESB, after the Falcon disappears, Vader commands Admiral Piett to: Calculate every possible destination along their last know trajectory Vader clearly cares about what their last trajectory is as well and believes he can find possible destinations from that information. If ships can be tracked through ...


37

The stretching stars is only seen just as a ship enters and exits hyperspace, showing the ship's acceleration/deceleration. However, once lightspeed is achieved, all that can be seen is the cloudy blue hyperspace tunnel (whether inside the ship or not). Entering hyperspace (as seen in the third Star Wars: The Force Awakens trailer): Exiting hyperspace (as ...


34

This is "FTA" by George RR Martin, originally published Analog Science Fiction in 1974. As per the description here, the twist ending is that hyperspatial travel is basically useless. Scientist is upset that they're funding other FTL avenues; Schechter sighed again. “You’re working under several misapprehensions. To begin with, the FTL Foundation was ...


28

Actually, randomly jumping to hyperspace is done in an emergency without any calculations. For example, in the Thrawn Trilogy, we find that Karrde's ship did that when running away - which is how they discovered the Katana Fleet by accident. The problems are: Massive objects tend to pull ships out of hyperspace (which is the principle on which ...


27

There is a train of thought by some fans to suggest that it actually took them a couple of weeks or even longer to get to Bespin without hyperdrive (though there is no supporting evidence to confirm this). This hypothosis is supported by Luke having more time to train with Yoda and seemingly reaching an advanced stage really quickly - ie controlled ...


25

You can't even compare the two. Hyperdrives allow you to travel around the galaxy in a matter of days whereas warp drives take decades, requiring numerous refueling operations along the way. However, the disparity between the two technologies stems more from the style of the two franchises than anything else: Star Wars is an action saga, and people needed ...


25

Quoting from the (fully Disney canon) factbook 'Star Wars in 100 Scenes'; The Falcon needed several weeks to limp from Anoat to Bespin with her backup hyperdrive. As to where the three systems mentioned (Hoth, Anoat and Bespin) were in relation to each other, you can see from the Star Wars: Essential Atlas (alas no longer considered canon, but still an ...


24

Same as in "What do you mean, why's it got to be built? It's a bypass. You've got to build bypasses." Other than comedic reasons, I don't think there's much of reasonable explanation given to us. It's just not possible to go around, so the house/planet (ie. "individual") must go if the "higher order" (government) wants it done.


23

I've been trying to find a certain "golden age" short sci-fi story "Avoidance Situation" by James V. McConnell, first published in If, February 1956, which is available at the Internet Archive. The anthology you read it in must have been Starships, edited by Asimov, Greenberg, and Waugh. alien scoutship pilot is very matter-of-fact of "Oh yes, you've ...


21

From an outside view, this is simply a dated plot-device. In Star Trek the next generation, for instance, the ship computer could spend hours searching for and retrieving information. This allowed other things to happen in the episode before the data came in and revealed a plot-twist. In Star Wars, the slow computer is an excuse for building tension. "...


19

In short, yes. They DID (1) wait in lightspeed as you noted, and (2) communicated in lightspeed, as confirmed by WGA script. And that hasn't ever been seen before in Star Wars; and #2 hasn't yet been explained or retconned as far as I could find. First, to confirm your observations from WGA script: OFFICER General, their shields are down! C-3PO ...


18

After some significant Google Fu-lery. I've located your novel. Night Walk But I know, that doesn't sound like it at all. So here is something from elsewhere: Bob Shaw's novel Night Walk imagines a system whereby the wormholes' topology is so complex that Earth has been reduced to sending out millions of probes in the hope that some will, by chance, ...


18

At the end of A New Hope, the Empire is making an attempt to destroy the Rebel base on Yavin 4 and end the Rebellion once and for all, and going to hyperspace would prevent that. One officer does point out the risk to Tarkin, who dismisses his concerns: Chief Bast: We've analyzed their attack, sir, and there is a danger. Should I have your ship standing ...


18

"Chased" yes, "tracked" no We see this very clearly in the canon novel Tarkin, where Tarkin and Darth Vader are forced to pursue Tarkin's (stolen) ship on a package tour of Imperial installations. Initially, Vader is able to track the ship through the Force (his meditation sphere being loaded in the cargo bay) but, once that is jettisoned, Tarkin remarks: ...


16

I don't know that anything canon ever rules out using communications while in Hyperspace. Reality is we don't see a lot of scenes where ships are in Hyperspace to begin with (I think ANH gives the most time to said scenario, and they had every reason NOT to send any transmissions). Something that, in theory, could do such a thing would be the Holonet, which ...


14

The way in which the hyperspace detector works is by extrapolating all of the (trillions of) possible destinations a ship might be aiming for from its current position and then using those to determine which is the most likely. That information is then relayed to the rest of the fleet. Assuming one of the Resistance support ships did decide to go into ...


14

Poul Anderson No World Of Their Own. The furry alien fits As does the situation And Anderson was certainly a Big Name. One of my old favourites and I still miss him seventeen years since he passed on.


13

Canon does not make this too clear, and the EU canon actually confuses the issue. The first thing to realise is that references to "Systems" do not necessarily refer to star systems, but can also refer to planet/moon systems. Earth is located in the Sol System, but can also be correctly referred to astronomically as the Earth-Moon System. If we ignore the EU ...


13

Remember that Han Solo's little hyperspace trick in TFA wasn't exactly regarded as sane. Hyperspace just isn't that precise. Second, when Chewie drops Rey off, she's a good distance away from the Supremacy and her Star Destroyers. It takes her escape pod some time to maneuver into the bay. In other words, she's not close enough to be a bomb. The third ...


12

Just to add to Gilles' excellent answer, posted as a separate answer because you can't do spoiler-protection in comments:


12

While space is essentially empty, empty is relative. Intergalactic space: the space between galaxies is the closest thing you will get to empty space. This space is outside of most gravity wells and matter has accumulated in galaxies so this space has nothing but the rarest of particles for thousands of parsecs in any direction. Intragalactic or ...


12

In the (canon) novel Tarkin, a Support Carrier uses precisely this technique to suddenly jump into fighter-range of an opponent. “Transponder signature identifies it as the Goliath,” Cala continued. “Capable of carrying a wing of starfighters. Armed with ten Taim and Bak H-eights and a Krupx missile delivery system. Not much in the way of shields—” “I’m ...


11

YES. Ships in hyperspace can see one another. The canon Clone Wars TV series has at times shown several starships in hyperspace together in the same hyperspace-tunnel. It would appear that someone need only look through the correct viewport to see the other ships inside the same hyperspace-tunnel. Also, in TV Spot #7 of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, we ...


11

The (canon) Star Wars novel Tarkin would suggest that a capital ship reverting to realspace near to a large static body could do very severe damage. Despite being crewed by sentients, the mysterious cruiser hadn’t discharged any of its point-defense or ranged weapons. If destruction of the base was the goal, why hadn’t whoever was behind the attack ...


10

The choice of origin of a coordinate system is indeed an arbitrary choice. As there is no absolute spacetime frame of reference I assume that is even less the case for a coordinate system related to Hyperspace. With Coruscant playing such an important role at the time where this coordinate system you mention is used, it seems natural to proclaim the origin ...


10

It's a matter of absurdly upscaling an extant trope: the bulldozing of a home for a highway bypass is the origin trope; upscaling it big enough to delete a planet is one of those upscale to the absurd. In a word, Absurdity. It's not intended to be sensible once thought about (especially since, later in the same volume, there's the diatribe on "Space is Big"....


10

Simple answer is that it's just a plot device. A more complex answer is that the distances between stars is actually quite vast, however the size of those solar systems, relatively speaking, isn't. So executing an "emergency" jump where all you care about is no longer being in the place you currently are should be trivial. For example, jumping 1 LY in ...


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