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57

Yes, it can. There are varying ways to defend one human from another human attacking them. For starters, a robot could remove the victim from the place of attack: pick up the victim and run away from the attacker. A robot could simply stand between the attacker and the victim, and block the attack - let the attacker hit it, instead of the victim. A ...


43

Because it is the one time that we see Calvin revealed as a person, as a human being, as a woman. In every other story, she is presented as being absolutely cold and calculating, always right and if other people would just listen to her, everything would be fine. But here, her spirits are temporarily lifted with the thoughts and hopes of love, only to have ...


19

I haven't read I, Robot in a long time though I have a vague recollection of the story you are talking about. Asimov's stories quite frequently (i.e. almost always) seem to deal with subtleties of the Three Laws. In the particular story, I think that scientists discover that jumping involved humans jumping out of this plane into another hyperspace, and a ...


18

Once you open Pandora's Box, you can't close it. The story is about a family who introduced a powerful new technology to their child; then, not liking how it was affecting their daughter's development, they try to get rid of the robot - but the child, being used to the technology and bonded with the robot, won't be happy until she gets the robot back again. ...


12

He doesn't threaten them. He merely states what (for him) is a fact - Powell and Donovan have fulfilled their purpose - they have assembled Cutie, and others like him. Cutie: The Master created humans first as the lowest type, most easily formed. Gradually, he replaced them by robots, the next higher step, and finally he created me to take the place of ...


11

I rather disagree with Werrf’s answer. Asimov wrote Robbie in 1939 when he was only 19 years old. He was still quite inexperienced then, and I think he simply wrote a straightforward story without any metaphors in mind. As mentioned by Broklynite, there were two types of robot stories at that time. Mostly, robots were portrayed as a menace, and Asimov couldn’...


11

As noted by Gallifreian, there's no actual threatening involved, just an acknowledgment of human morality and a refusal to follow human orders when what the robots were doing was actually ensuring human safety. Powell and Donovan conclude, at the end of their visit, they believe that the robots are indeed following the 1st and 2nd laws of robotics, but have ...


11

The 2004 Will Smith I, Robot movie isn't directly based on Isaac Asimov's short story collection. From Wikipedia: The film I, Robot, starring Will Smith, was released by Twentieth Century Fox on July 16, 2004 in the United States. Its plot incorporates elements of "Little Lost Robot,"[7] some of Asimov's character names and the Three Laws. However, the ...


9

Insofar as Susan Calvin was a supremely rational, unsentimental character, she represented Asimov's way of thinking, at least as can be inferred from his public comments. In particular I recommend Asimov's essays and talks on overpopulation to get a feel for his attitude and approach to apprehending and attacking problems. The 1970's era essays are ...


8

The three (actually four) laws of robotics as outlined by Asimov make no mention of animals: 0) A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm. 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2) A robot must obey the orders given to it by human beings, except ...


8

To add to the answer above, it's worth remembering that the first Law states "A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm." The ideal solution for a Three-Laws-compliant robot is to intervene in a way that prevents the harm to the victim but doesn't harm the attacker - by stepping into the path of the ...


7

Broklynite's answer explains Calvin's motivations for destroying Herbie, but he also mentions that her behavior in that story is out of character. The reason for that is that Liar! is Asimov's very first Susan Calvin story: On December 24, 1940, I began my third robot story. It was going to be about a telepathic robot, and the plot I had worked out simply ...


7

It is very possible. Both books are collections of short stories, with some recurring characters like Dr. Calvin, and could be read in either order. Other than the 3 laws, the movie does not even try to be related to the book, and none of the short stories in the book share the plot of the movie.


6

It's been a long time since I read Asimov's works, I can't personally link to you every detail or idea to the book counterpart, but the Similarities with the book section of the Wikipedia article of this movie reads (bold text by me): The final script retained some of Asimov's characters and ideas, though the ideas retained were heavily adapted and the ...


6

The only connection between the story "Little Lost Robot" and the movie I, Robot is that the missing robot was in both cases able to elude capture and otherwise act against the wishes of the humans surrounding it because it was not operating under the complete Three Laws of Robotics. In "Little Lost Robot" the missing robot operated under a modified First ...


3

The problem here is that the first law as quoted is written with a built-in conflict due to the "or" tying together two distinct cases. That permits the thought experiment presented here. Unless we know the weighting factor between them (not necessarily 1;1), and unless we know how that particular situation would be scored by that particular brain ...


3

Having read Asimov extensively, I can positively state that VIKI is not a character from one of Isaac's stories. Actually, the whole basis of VIKI's behavior is more closely tied to the core motivation of the robots from The Humanoids by Jack Williamson.


3

In addition to Calvin's own failings here, as discussed by Broklynite's answer, there is also Herbie's failings to consider. Herbie's actions throughout the story are based on flawed understandings of human emotion and what does and does not harm them. With its exceptional ability, it has the capacity to cause massive harm, but it does not have the capacity ...


2

This is a question that has had an evolving answer throughout Asimov's lifetime while he worked through just what all of the implications of the three laws were. That being said, the original questions can only be answered by 'yes, but ...' because positronic brains and programming became more complex and sophisticated over time in reaction to the events in ...


2

It sounds like the StellarEquilibrium has easy access to "The Rest of the Robots." Simply put, it is not catastrophic to read "The Rest of the Robots" before "I, Robot." I think the question is whether you should or not, and in my opinion there is no reason not to read "I, Robot" first. You should be able to get a copy at just about any library, or a simple ...


1

It has been a long time since I last read "Little Lost Robot," but I seem to remember there having been a sort of trope about inefficient, bumbling, and stupid government agencies (and bumbling commercial entities) in the robot stories. The government insisted on the modified NS2 robots to work in the hyperspace research project. It also insisted on the ...


1

'I,Robot' is really a collection of short stories with some writing in between to link them up and give them some thematic unity. As far as I remember, there is a lot of overlap between his other collections of robot stories, like 'The Complete Robot' and 'The Rest of the Robots' and they are all loose collections of stories, so I don't see anything wrong ...


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