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A long-time Star Trek fan and quadriplegic named George La Forge had been following the original series and was an avid fan. His unfortunate passing in 1975 inspired creator Gene Roddenberry to focus on creating a new character with disabilities. Screenwriter David Gerrold suggested the name Geordi LaForge in respect of their fan. Mr. Roddenberry agreed the ...


9

Mainly Zoroastrianism and the Cathars, but as with anything George does it is not a one-to-one comparison and he draws inspiration from numerous sources. According to George R. R. Martin, this religion's dualistic aspects of a good and an evil god are inspired by Zoroastrianism, along with the Cathars of Medieval Europe. In this interview (at about 47:00 ...


7

This was addressed in an interview with Discovery showrunner Aaron Harberts. Q: Why is Michael Burnham’s name… Michael? All right, so here we go. We've worked on a number of Bryan Fuller shows… Wonderfalls, Pushing Daisies. Many of his female protagonists have typically what you would call male names. Chuck was one. Jaye was another. When we all sat ...


6

The character Q played by actor John de Lancie in the character's debut in the Star Trek:The Next Generation pilot, Encounter at Farpoint was inspired by a long-time British fan of the franchise named Janet Quarton. In the early 1970's Brittain there were only a few fan followings available and all seemed to fall short of the enthusiasm Ms. Quarton had for ...


6

I haven't watched the series (which I am guessing you are referring to the newer series), but I am assuming from your description "Hecate" is the TV version of Miss Hardbroom (HB) from the books. The way you describe them is similar to the books in a sense, except I have no memory of HB actually being a villain, she just disliked Mildred and the others. ...


6

Ignorance leads to fear, fear leads to hatred, and hatred leads to violence. This is the equation. Quote by Ibn Rushd, famous Andalusian scholar, that has most relevance here.


5

The house system is well-established in British schools, and goes back hundreds of years. It originated (and was most common) in boarding schools like Hogwarts, where the students live on the school grounds, and the houses they're sorted into are the houses in which they actually live. Again, just like Hogwarts. It's worth noting that the popularity of ...


5

I think it's one of the cases when asking such question may make sense - it's probably something more then repetitiveness of tropes. Sanderson was asked about that and he also does seem to think so: Questioner So I was reading the Wheel of Time and in the first one when they get to the saidin and saidar, the pools — they're very similar to Shardpools....


5

JK Rowling is definitely familiar with James & The Giant Peach. In a 2001 interview: People sometimes compare you to Roald Dahl. I've been compared to him more than anyone else. I take it as a compliment. There are similarities in our humour sometimes. Charlie And The Chocolate Factory and James And The Giant Peach are brilliant, but he's not ...


5

It likely refers to the fact that some of the Combine are former humans, enslaved by the Combine, and now the lowest tier of what is presumably their caste system. The BBC describes India's caste system like this Rural communities were long arranged on the basis of castes - the upper and lower castes almost always lived in segregated colonies, the water ...


5

It looks like David Drake addressed this on his website: For a setting I used a young nobleman making a grand tour with his tutor and personal servant. The action stemmed from real events in the Greek islands in 1795: a Russian nobleman determined to take a Greek temple back to St. Petersburg in the warship he borrowed from the Czar–and who bombarded it ...


4

The lead character for Star Trek: Discovery was originally named "LCDR Rainsford" and it was decided that she would only ever be called "Number One" in honor of the First Lieutenant on Captain Pike's Enterprise, who had no name in the original series. In an interview with Denofgeeks.com Sonequa Martin-Green reveals there are three reasons driving the ...


2

There's several possible reasons Martha was a very popular name for girls and women at the time The characters needed to be generic (so as not to upstage their famous sons), yet relatable. Picking a common woman's name made these women likely remind readers of their own mothers, or women they knew. Martha was considered a patriotic name due to the first ...


2

Your interpretation seems unlikely. The name, "Rachel Roth" (no 'a'), comes from the comics, Teen Titans [third series] #20 [2005] when she decides to enroll in high school. "Roth" was last name of her human mother, Angela Roth (albeit going by "Arella", which means the "The Messenger Angel" in Azarathian, until 2004 when her birth name was introduced). "...


2

Structure - indeed. Forerunners etc more taken from P.Anthony's Cluster series. The troopers are more Starship Troopers with some 40k Ultramarine... lots of cross- pollination.


2

I'm pretty sure it is. In the duelling club in CoS Gilderoy Lockhart's outfit and stance look exactly like a (olschool) fencer:


1

Maybe the original concept of Batman was only marginally influenced by Bela Lugosi's Dracula? I mean there's no way you could say, "Batman flying through the night" in 1939 and someone not say, "Oh you mean like Dracula?". If I remember rightly whoever owned the Dracula copyrights in the 20's/30's were fiercely protective of them and wouldn't allow anyone to ...


1

The facts are that Kripke has mentioned the huge influence that Good Omen’s had on the creation of supernatural. Spn’s Crowley’s namesake is in fact Crowley from GO. Even Castiel’s character design is completely inspired from the Sandman character John Constantine. There are many references littered throughout the show, clearly Kripke’s way of showing his ...


1

I have been noticing a lot more similarities. Shaitan is used in both but understandable if same source material but then also character names furok is one but I’ve noticed more. I can’t help but wonder if Dune isn’t an entirety accidental prequel to Wheel of Time.


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