122

The robots in Asimov's works generally don't have the 'mental' sophistication needed to look ahead for abstract harm in the manner you suggest. For them, the 'inaction' clause must mean the robot cannot allow imminent harm - i.e they must act to prevent harm when they see the harm about to happen. Such events generally don't occur as humans go about their ...


94

There are various terms for US copyright and when the works published in that situation nominally expire. However, since the 1980s every 20 years a new copyright extension act that includes all works published in a range including 1928 has been passed by the US congress. This is because Steamboat Willy was published in 1928, the first appearance of Mickey ...


75

This question is covered by the Asimov FAQ: All of Asimov's work, fiction and non-fiction, was under copyright at the time of the Good Doctor's death. Under current U.S. law, the copyrights for his works published before 1978 will not expire until 95 years after the copyrights were obtained, and those published from 1978 onward will remain in effect for ...


28

Since the "merger" of the Robot universe and the Foundation universe reveals that robots manipulated and dominated human history for thousands of years, in a very real sense the galaxy is their padded room and most of Asimov's works in this "unified universe" take place inside that padded room. We just can't see the walls.


14

Any other Asimov Books where Susan Calvin appears? Yes. List of stories featuring Susan Calvin She's also co-opted by a bunch of other authors as well (Arthur C Clark for one). The Wikipedia link provided above lists 12 stories by Asimov in which she can be found either as a protagonist, bit part or referenced as background detail. "Escape!" "Evidence" "...


14

In the story Faro 24 and Yimot 70, who constructed the makeshift planetarium, say that when they opened the holes in the roof, what they saw was just a dimly lit roof: ...The caps fell away and the roof glittered all over with little dots of light-" "Well?" "Well--nothing. That was the whacky part of it. Nothing happened. It was just a roof ...


10

Could it be you're thinking of "Good Taste" (readable here)? It's the closest match I can think of, except that it's kind of the reverse of what you're asking about. It involves a chef using real ingredients rather than the simulated forms from a computer. Chawker Minor returns from his 'Grand Tour', including a visit to Earth, to his home on Gammer, one ...


9

My understanding of it was that the typical Three Laws robot interpreted the First Law to mean "Nor, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm right here and now when the robot is within sight of him and can tell what's obviously about to happen if the robot does not choose to interfere." That's different from locking up the human today just ...


8

A complete collection of all of Asimov's fiction was planned, but abandoned after only two volumes. According to Isaac Asimov in the introduction to The Complete Stories, Volume 1, Doubleday intended to publish a uniform collection of all of his fiction: short stories and novels, science fiction and mysteries: It is time, therefore, for Doubleday to pull ...


7

Possibly Light Verse, published in The Saturday Evening Post, September / October, 1973. If so, the (very) brief mention you're thinking of is: The very last person anyone would expect to be a murderer was Mrs. Avis Lardner. Widow of the great astronaut-martyr, she was a philanthropist, an art collector, a hostess extraordinary, and, everyone agreed, an ...


7

It is very possible. Both books are collections of short stories, with some recurring characters like Dr. Calvin, and could be read in either order. Other than the 3 laws, the movie does not even try to be related to the book, and none of the short stories in the book share the plot of the movie.


6

There are actually quite a few names that Asimov reused in his works: Thaddeus Thaddeus Araman in "The Dead Past" Thaddeus Milton in "Breeds There a Man" Norman Norman Muller in "Franchise" Norman in "What If —" Sarah Sarah Muller in "Franchise" Sarah Hillary in "Dreaming is a Private Thing" A slight variation: Sara May Evans in "It's Such a Beautiful ...


5

In his autobiography Asimov specifically mentions making sure to renew the copyright on each of his works as the expiration date came up, and how this became more and more of an chore as his body of work increased. If I recall correctly, he has more than 500 books credited to have written or edited. I don't know, but I would assume that his estate (...


5

My understanding was always that it wasn't the stars themselves which caused the problem, it was the knowledge of just how large the universe was. Even had they put all 30,000 dots, that would have done nothing, because the point of the star is the knowledge that it is a star, the same as one of your six suns, but a distance away so incomprehensible that the ...


4

The closest thing I can find is the 2-volume Asimov's Complete Stories published by Doubleday, though with only 80-odd stories it doesn't really look all that "complete."


3

I always thought that the issue with the experiment was that the psychologist knew beforehand what to expect, and they did control the situation. They were the ones who designed the experiment, who implemented, who put it in motion, and they always were in control and could turn on the light or open a window if they wished to. They were trying to check if ...


3

Where am I wrong? Are the Laws not what actually guides the robots, instead being something simplified for the robot user manual booklet or something? If you read I, Robot, the stories are generally about times when there is a conflict in interpretations of the three laws. Most commonly the humans think that the robots' interpretations are the wrong ones. ...


3

Zeroth law. A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm If all the humans are locked in padded cells there isn't much procreation taking place. Ergo, the human race dies out. Contrary to some other answers, I believe robot thinking is sophisticated enough to deal with future harm, just not to deal with hypothetical harm....


3

This seems to me to pretty clearly be the story Profession by Isaac Asimov. I remember a story (by Asimov maybe?) Yep, it's by Asimov. about a future in which teaching in school is done through infusing the material into kids' brains? To quote Wikipedia, the story is set in a society "in which children are educated by almost instantaneous direct ...


2

For additional context, the full correspondence wasn't about a single episode, but the overall direction of the two main leads, as the correspondence occurred between Season 1 and Season 2. Asimov recommended ways that Shatner could still stand out as the primary lead: The problem, then, is how to convince the world, and Mr. Shatner, that Mr. Shatner ...


2

I believe that, by that point, Portia's own death is imminent. (She is, after all, extremely old.) If she is going to die anyway, then from a First Law perspective turning off life support does not count as directly injuring a human being anymore. (The action has become neutral, as the outcome is clearly seen to be the same whether or not the action is ...


2

Since you don't specify that you are requesting an "in universe" reason ... I think it's important to remember that the three laws are just a story device. Asimov (wisely) is quite vague about how they are implemented, as he is about many technical details. And "I should just lock all the humans in a padded cell for their safety" would result in a rather ...


2

It sounds like the StellarEquilibrium has easy access to "The Rest of the Robots." Simply put, it is not catastrophic to read "The Rest of the Robots" before "I, Robot." I think the question is whether you should or not, and in my opinion there is no reason not to read "I, Robot" first. You should be able to get a copy at just about any library, or a simple ...


1

Dr. Susan Calvin appears in Satisfaction Guaranteed: Dr. Susan Calvin was there, too, sitting stiffly in thin-lipped abstraction. She is clearly the same robotpsychologist (my emphasis): "Mrs. Belmont, I hope you appreciate the importance of this experiment. Your husband tells me he has given you some of the background. I would like to give you more, ...


1

It has been a long time since I last read "Little Lost Robot," but I seem to remember there having been a sort of trope about inefficient, bumbling, and stupid government agencies (and bumbling commercial entities) in the robot stories. The government insisted on the modified NS2 robots to work in the hyperspace research project. It also insisted on the ...


1

The Three Laws of Robotics require an analysis of all the laws to full answer this question: First Law - A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Second Law - A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. Third Law - A robot must ...


1

Kind of a frame challenge - is locking a human in a padded cell preventing them from harm? If you're going to allow the abstract possibility of future arm as motivation for a robot to use the 1st law to lock humans up, it should be noted that taking away a humans freedom is generally causing them harm to some extent in the form of psychological damage - and ...


1

'I,Robot' is really a collection of short stories with some writing in between to link them up and give them some thematic unity. As far as I remember, there is a lot of overlap between his other collections of robot stories, like 'The Complete Robot' and 'The Rest of the Robots' and they are all loose collections of stories, so I don't see anything wrong ...


1

As other said, 31. Plus an introduction, last word and short introduction to each of the 7 sections. See the below images of the contents page of the book for evidence:


1

Asimov called guns "blasters" in Foundation and Star Wars followed suit. The Foundation was set up on the "outer rim of the galaxy" and Luke's home planet of Tatooine is also in "the outer rim". Luke even says something to the effect of a bright, center of the galaxy (Tractor/Coruscant) and that they are the farthest planet from.


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