97

TL;DR: Yes. In fact, it wasn't just written for children in general - it was written for Tolkien's own children. Tolkien's own words: The generally different tone and style of The Hobbit is due, in point of genesis, to it being taken by me as a matter from the great cycle susceptible of treatment as a ‘fairy-story’, for children. - The Letters of JRR ...


96

"Influential"? No, probably not. He seems to have been a competent teacher (though apparently he was a terrible mumbler who was frequently hard to understand) and a competent scholar. Note: I'm not saying he was mediocre: You don't get a named professorship at Oxford by being ordinary! People who should know have said that his essay "The Monsters and the ...


90

It's mentioned in his authorised biography that Tolkien had a personal liking of mushrooms, stretching as far back as his idyllic childhood days in Hall Green, Birmingham, the very same memories that supposedly inspired his writings about the Shire. According to his younger brother Hilary Tolkien, his recollection is that a particularly loathsome farmer (...


83

Beren and Lúthien Beren and Lúthien's story, from the Silmarillion, was based on Tolkien's wife Edith dancing for him in the woods near the military hospital where he was recovering after he was invalided out of WWI. She was Lúthien, he was Beren. The Tale of Beren and Lúthien was regarded as the central part of his legendarium by Tolkien. The story and ...


79

The full origin is revealed in the prologue to Fellowship of the Ring, where Tolkien discusses the Red Book of Westmarch. The Red Book is actually a collection of other works, containing all of the material for The Silmarillion (through Bilbo's Translations From the Elvish) The Hobbit, which is Bilbo's account of the adventure The Lord of the Rings The ...


72

It seems that in germanic languages, notably German, the sun/moon genders are "reversed" like that, as sumelic commented. Die Sonne (sun, female) Der Mond (moon, male) In other words, your assumption that male sun / female moon is somehow "general rule" doesn't hold up. And you don't even need to look at some exotic place.


70

TL;DR Tolkien himself did NOT consider it a trilogy. It shouldn't even be called 3 books, since Tolkien didn't refer to them as books, but as volumes, and any time he used the word he air-quoted it as 'books'. Wikipedia gives us a good start: Tolkien regarded it as a single work and divided it into a prologue, six books, and five appendices. Because of ...


66

On the contrary, both Gandalf's return and his "promotion" came before the notion of his death and resurrection. Tolkien's first draft of Fellowship of the Ring ended at Balin's tomb, at which point he stopped for a long while before continuing. However, a sketch of the plot of the chapter (dated by Christopher Tolkien to late 1939, and written immediately ...


65

Tolkien felt that Bombadil represented an important concept in the story, but that he was essentially useless in defeating evil as represented by Sauron. Here you have it from the horse's mouth. I'm not sure if this is sufficient to address your issue, but it's the only mention of pacifism in a Bombadil context in Tolkien's Letters. Tom Bombadil is not ...


64

Tolkien himself says the Lord of the Rings is neither allegorical nor topical.... I cordially dislike allegory in all its manifestations, and always have done so since I grew old and wary enough to detect its presence. From the introduction to the Lord of the Rings. You are reading too much into the Lord of the Rings. The intent is not for it to ...


63

Although these books do seem to fall somewhere in the crack between outright infringement and fair usage David Day seems to be relying on a number of legal figleaves to protect himself: The books always prominently marked as being written by David Day rather than by J. R. R. Tolkien The books contain a disclaimer on the first page that these books are not ...


58

Tolkien (in his letter 110 to his Publisher) seems happy to admit that although several of the "Riddles in the Dark" were traditional (and were therefore adapted by him rather than being fully original works of fiction), all of the others were his own work and that none of them required any additional attribution since the authors were historical/ unknown: ...


55

Ardalambion, a fansite dedicated to analyzing Tolkien's invented languages, has asked this very question; according to him the answer is somewhere between 2 and 20, depending on how permissive you are when defining a language (emphasis his): If we consider the "historical" versions of the tongues that are relevant for the classical form of the Arda mythos,...


55

Tolkien probably disagreed with pure pacifism Judging the views of an author from their work is always a risky proposition. That said, I think this passage captures something of Tolkien’s views on war: I am in too great doubt to rule. To prepare or to let be? To prepare for war, which is yet only guessed: train craftsmen and tillers in the midst of ...


51

Thranduil is, indeed, a name invented by J. R. R. Tolkien himself. There was also a strange Elf clad in green and brown, Legolas, a messenger from his father, Thranduil, the King of the Elves of Northern Mirkwood. And seated a little apart was a tall man with a fair and noble face, dark-haired and grey-eyed, proud and stern of glance. The ...


48

From Arika Okrent's In the Land of Invented Languages, page 284, talking about Tolkien and what made him different: Plenty of other authors throughout history have provided fictional languages for their imagined lands. The citizens in Sir Thomas More's Utopia (1516) have a Utopian language that looks very much like Latin. The inhabitants of the moon in ...


47

Transcribed by hand "That's that!" said Sam. What we I expected. And I don't like it. I suppose now we are just exactly where he wanted to bring us. Well, let's get moving away as quick as we can. The treacherous worm! That loud whistle of his wasn't pure joy at getting out of the tunnel, it was pure wickedness of some sort. And what sort we'll soon know. ...


45

When Tolkien began writing The Hobbit in 1930, his children were 13, 10, 6, and 1, and he finished it two years later, so if the story that he wrote it for his own children is true, then presumably he hoped his two oldest children would enjoy it. According to wikipedia: In a 1955 letter to W. H. Auden, Tolkien recollects that he began work on The ...


45

Treebeard's voice was based on that of Tolkien's good friend C.S. Lewis. From Humphrey Carpenter's J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography, p. 258: When work was resumed, Tolkien drew up outlines for the end of the story - which he did not imagine was more than a few chapters away - and began to sketch the episode where two of the hobbits encounter Treebeard, the ...


44

No, no new information could be added. But "canon" in Tolkien is a very difficult matter. He was working on some of the stories for nearly 50 years on and off, and his conception of many elements changed significantly over this period. His son Christopher traces the development and evolution of some of the elements in his massive 12-volume History of Middle-...


44

In my opinion, no, because by my interpretation of that letter excerpt that's not what Tolkien is actually saying – In the 'Mirror of Galadriel', 1381, it appears that Galadriel conceived of herself as capable of wielding the Ring and supplanting the Dark Lord. That's fairly clear in what Tolkien is saying. He's saying that Galadriel saw herself as being ...


41

Donald Swann's settings of a number of Tolkien's songs, "The Road Goes Ever On", were written with Tolkien's approval and input. I think they're probably about as close to "official" as you can hope for.


41

According to Wikipedia, Edgar Rice Burroughs' A Princess of Mars "was possibly the first fiction of [the 20th] century to feature a constructed language" and preceded Tolkien. Tolkien was far from the first to write with any invented words. Part of the problem is that a work with constructed language is either successful or forgotten, with newspeak from ...


40

Tolkien wrote an essay on this subject in 1960, called "Dangweth Pengolod." The essay is rather long, so I'm not going to quote the whole thing, but the highlight for me is this passage: [T]o the changefulness of Ea, to weariness of the unchanged, to the renewing of the union: to these three, which are one, the Eldar also are subject in their degree. In ...


39

Gerontius "The Old" Took, whose longevity (his sole defining character trait, given that he never appears in the book) was based on Tolkien's grandfathers: [The Old Took] has part of his origin in the fact that both my grandfathers were longeval. My father's father was in his eleventh year when Waterloo was fought; my mother's father, a much younger man, ...


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