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It's mentioned in his authorised biography that Tolkien had a personal liking of mushrooms, stretching as far back as his idyllic childhood days in Hall Green, Birmingham, the very same memories that supposedly inspired his writings about the Shire. According to his younger brother Hilary Tolkien, his recollection is that a particularly loathsome farmer (...


10

Yes and no. No, because the filmmakers in a way came up with the language he spoke in, but yes because the base of it is Tolkien's language, Quenya. But, as Tolkien director Dome Karukoski told The A.V. Club, that scene takes place when Tolkien was still in university, when he was just beginning to create the mythology of Middle-earth. Tolkien wrote the ...


8

It was an artifact of the way The Lord of the Rings began as a sequel to The Hobbit. And what more can Hobbits do? They can be comic, but their comedy is suburban unless it is set against things more elemental. JRRT, Letter 19, 16 December 1937 If you look at The Return of the Shadow, part 1 of Christopher Tolkien's history of how the LoTR was written, ...


5

Not quite Quenya. “He’s thinking about fairies, so what he shouts is more a language of fairies,” [Tolkien director Dome Karukoski] told The A.V. Club about the scene. To make the language accurate to the time, the director worked with a linguist to come up with a sort of proto-Elvish language. “Tolkien was using the Finnish language, to the point where ...


2

My take on the racism issue: (not specifically the east-west problem) In universe, the Numenoreans/Dunedain are deeply racist. Even Faramir (who is presented as wise and kind) categorizes people as: Us, Men of Twilight, Men of Darkness. Gondor even had a civil war because one king married a non-dunedan woman. The fact is that Tolkien created a word where ...


1

I don't know about why. That question could probably be asked about anything in the story, and the answer would most of the time be "just because". But you are right, it definitely was part of the world lore and was put there consciously. A quote from The Fellowship of the Ring: Hobbits have a passion for mushrooms, surpassing even the greediest likings ...


1

It is often cited that Tolkien developed his languages mainly with the thoughts of creating names for his characters and locations, and even small phrases. He admitted in a letter himself (sorry but I don't have the citation available right now) that he didn't develop their grammar and vocabulary as much as to make compositions or talk with them. Common ...


1

Might it be this one? But at that last word of Fëanor: that at the least the Noldor should do deeds to live in song for ever, he raised his head, as one that hears a voice far off, and he said: ‘So shall it be! Dear-bought those songs shall be accounted, and yet shall be well-bought. For the price could be no other. Thus even as Eru spoke to us shall ...


1

I would like readers of J. R. R. Tolkien to consider the possibility that he knew many traditional songs, and had at least some of those melodies in mind when he wrote his poems/songs. Two examples follow: Samwise Gamgee’s song about the troll eating a shinbone in the first book of the trilogy exactly matches the form and feel of “fox went out on a chilly ...


1

I would say, yes, he was. Most of the other answers either dispute that Tolkien was prejudiced against the East, or focus on textual analysis and don't talk about his own quotes. The answers focusing on the text of The Lord of the Rings and the Silmarillion have already discussed how the West is associated with Valinor whereas the East is associated with ...


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