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52

"May y'all enjoy Christmas and may y'all enjoy the new year." QISmaS = Not a canonical tlhIngan Hol word, but a phonetic approximation of "Christmas". bo- = Pronomial prefix; indicates that the subject of the verb is second-person plural and the object is third-person. "Y'all do something to him/her/it/them" tIv = enjoy (verb) -jaj = Verb suffix; indicates ...


36

Somewhere fairly early on, someone at Pocket Books realized that if Marc Okrand really had developed an entire conlang for Klingon, they could probably sell a dictionary based on it. The Klingon Dictionary was first published in 1985 - before TNG and many of the films - and the reissued in 1992 - five years after TNG started, one year after The Undiscovered ...


29

Per the Klingon Wikia page for cat, the literal translation for kitten would be; vIghro' Qup. Young cat. You might also consider vIghro' ghu Baby cat Note that there's no direct translation of the word "cat" in the official Klingon language Dictionaries. In his Klingon for the Galactic Traveler, Mark Okrand (the creator of the Klingon Language) ...


24

You're on the right track! Needs some work, though. SoH ghuHmoH jIH! means "You're. The view screen warns!" Klingon pronouns are absorbed by pronomial prefixes: qaghuHmoH! = "I warn you!" You could also go with yIghuH! ("Be aware!"). Alternatively: yIqIm! ("Pay attention!") The word toy'wI' means "servant". Somebody who serves something - a waiter, or ...


22

In-universe, the Klingon language is one that evolved naturally on the Klingon homeworld; There are various accounts within Enterprise and TNG of "ancient Klingon" and "medieval Klingon", suggesting a linguistic tradition that goes back tens of thousands of years and that pre-dates recorded and written history... TARQUIN: Have you had a chance to look at ...


21

Bat'leths were modelled upon Chinese fighting crescents. According to its designer, Dan Curry, the bat'leth... "...was modelled after a Chinese fighting crescent. Now it's become one of the icons associated with the show [TNG]." (Source) Here is his original sketch: As a fighting crescent is actually a type of knife, it might be better to classify the ...


19

According to omniglot.com it means: Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!


18

Uhura: "I am here to help you. With Respect. There is a criminal hiding in these ruins. He has killed many of our people." Klingon: "Why should I care about a human killing humans?" Uhura: "Because you care about honor. And this man has none. You and your people are in danger." (From the subtitles.)


18

John O confessed in chat that is comment was a joke. I put in a flippant comment yesterday that inspired DVK to ask if klingon was spoken in the Star Wars movies. I wouldn't have posted it if I thought anyone could take it serious. So, no, Klingon was not used in any Star Wars movies.


16

Apparently the spelling is "kellicam", and the Memory Alpha wiki article says: Klingon transporter systems have a range of 20,000 kellicams. (TNG: "Redemption") ... It was stated in "A Matter Of Honor" that Federation transporters have a range of 40,000 kilometers. If Klingon transporters have a similar range, this would indicate that 1 kellicam ...


15

Yes In the DS9 episode "Sons and Daughters", Martok uses "her" when referring to his Bird-of-Prey: MARTOK: I am General Martok. Welcome to the Rotarran. May you prove worthy of this ship and bring honour to her name. Also, in the episode "Soldiers of the Empire", we have: MARTOK: Three days ago, the battle cruiser B'Moth began a patrol along the ...


14

Definitely Klingon Although Tolkien's writings on Quenya and Sindarin are extensive, there simply isn't enough to carry on realistic conversations; unless you're willing to go into some of the fan attempts to flesh the language out, you and your Elvish-speaking partner are basically limited to quoting passages of the Legendarium at each other. Tolkien ...


13

From the KLV Klingon/Standard Vocabulary Arrow is translated as puv DuQwI' It is literally translated as "flying spike".


13

As Broklynite mentions in the comments, the reason a picture of Spock was used is likely because he is the most recognizable symbol of Star Trek, and that picture in particular. As for whether or not Spock speaks Klingon: At some point after the events of Star Trek V: The Really Really Bad One, Spock left the Enterprise to become a diplomat, and one of his ...


13

This isn't Klingon. According to the Font of All Knowledge, there are three more or less commonly used scripts for Klingon. KLI pIqaD is the standard: Earlier script efforts do not correlate with Okrand's Klingon language, and so don't appear to be in use. Skybox pIqaD: Mandel Script: None of the Star Wars symbols match any of the Star Trek writing ...


10

The Memory Alpha section on the design out-of-universe is very detailed about it and has some interesting things to say. It's partially Dorn's fault: the article explains that Dorn wanted a weapon that had connotations of martial arts rather than barbarians, so there was a bit of a push for a samurai-inspired design. One of the distinctive things about the ...


9

According to The Klingon Art of War, the title of 'Dahar Master' is bestowed upon a very small number of legendary Klingon warriors by the Emperor, or presumably by the Chancellor. There doesn't seem to be any special qualification, but all of the recipients mentioned (Biroq, Koloth, Kor, Kang) seem to fit quite a similar mold Their deeds must represent a ...


9

Word of Okrand The closest thing to that that I’m aware of is an article by Mark Okrand in the March 1996 issue of HolQeD: The Journal of the Klingon Language Institute. Unfortunately, that doesn’t appear to be available any more, even as a back issue in paper form, but it is summarized here. The Klingon words for arithmetic operations are derived from ...


8

For what it's worth, the Klingon word for "to laugh" is Hagh. That's onomotopoeic enough, I would think.


8

As far as I can tell, no other language has been fully constructed for use in Star Trek, or at least not to nearly the degree that Klingon has. Vulcan has been defined to some extent, but it seems to be less than Klingon. It is not, however, recognized as canon. http://www.omniglot.com/writing/vulcan.htm Romulan has been briefly described. http://www....


8

KlingonMusic.Net has a list of references to Klingon music in Star Trek episodes. The entries specifically identified as Klingon Opera, and which involved some on-screen representation (as opposed to characters just talking about it) are: The example in your question: ‘aqtu’ mellota’ je – Klingon Opera, excerpt sung by Worf and Amarie in TNG: “...


8

The Klingon language was not based on any other language, but was crafted by a professional linguist, Dr. Marc Okrand, to work as its own language: "...the producers called on professional linguist Dr. Marc Okrand to create authentic speech for the Klingons. His task was to make their language as alien as their ridged prosthetic foreheads, while still ...


8

Accurate "Okrandian" Klingon was used in most of the feature films, but not in most of the TV episodes. As noted by Ronald D. Moore, how the Klingon language was dealt with was usually left to individual screenwriters, and he personally preferred to just "make it up phonetically". Of course, one might argue that any Klingon heard in the movies or TV shows ...


8

From the screenplay NU'DAQ: (counting in Klingon) Wa'... Cha'... Wej -- Data puts him down without the slightest strain. NU'DAQ: (amazed) Maw' tok. The KlingonWiki (and various other sources) simply refer to it as an exclamation of surprise.


8

For the most part, Klingon doesn't often use nouns to speak of moods, states or behaviors; it is more likely to use verbs. For example, rather than saying "She is renowned for her cunning.", you would be more likely to see a sentence like 'ongmo' noy. ("Because she/he is cunning, she/he is well-known."), using the verbs 'ong ("be cunning, be sly") and noy ("...


7

You can see a copy of the transcript, along with the English and German translations, at this link. The link is to a Google+ post containing a scan of the transcript which was released by Marc Okrand (the creator of the Klingon language) through the annual qepHom (a meeting of Klingon speakers) in Germany. The scan also includes an explanation of the new ...


7

Probably No. The script in your question uses Nal-Huttese characters: These are a calligraphic form of Huttese, in contrast to Trade Huttese: Both were created around 1997 for use in The Phantom Menace. While Trade Huttese has nothing in common with Klingon characters, Nal-Huttese has a slight resemblance — but it is perhaps only very slight and ...


7

Nope, it's not Klingon. For the record, "Kill Kirk." would be qIrq yIHoH! Not sure what a proper translation of "Hallelujah!" would be. Perhaps Qapla''a'! ("Great success!").


7

It was not changed deliberately, but rather through a series of what might be called accidents. In some ways, this change resembles the evolution of how words are pronounced in natural languages, and in other ways, it's quite different. When Marc Okrand decided on the sounds of the Klingon language, he had only the sounds used in Star Trek: The Motion ...


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