Hot answers tagged

121

IN-Universe - As Worf said, it's something not discussed with non-Klingons. OUT of Universe - To summarize, it's a very meta in-joke. In the original series, they had a limited budget, and makeup options were few. So the Klingons got goatees and dusky skin, and belt buckles made of bubble wrap. When they made Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Roddenberry ...


117

Viral Mutation This apparent discrepancy was explained in Star Trek Enterprise. Long story short, Klingons experimented with genetic mutation to make themselves stronger, much like what was accomplished with Kahn and the Augments, but there were side effects that made the Klingons look "hoo-mahn". These side effects were spread by a resulting virus, and ...


109

Worf actually addresses this in the DS9 episode "The Way of the Warrior" and it is because "In war, nothing is more honorable than victory." Worf: Sir, I strongly recommend against that. It is likely there are cloaked Klingon warships in the vicinity, lying in wait. Bashir: Doesn't sound very honorable to me. Worf: In war, nothing is more ...


71

It's a quick and simple way to show the viewer just how badass this new, unknown alien is. During The Next Generation, Data and Worf had the most raw strength - Worf due to his Klingon heritage, and Data because he was an android. But Worf was also security personnel, with training to deal with intruders - so if a new unknown alien is able to toss him ...


63

One of the main points of the recurring Worf arc throughout TNG and DS9 is that the Klingons are not, in fact, as honorable as they like to claim. Like humans, Klingons have a tendency to say one thing and do another, especially in matters of life and death like war and politics. Ezri Dax sums it up thusly in DS9 7x22 "Tacking into the Wind": I see a ...


57

Probably the latter. Star Trek seems to like this joke; Chekov claimed many things as "invented in Russia," Spock attributes Sherlock Holmes quotes and Richard Nixon quotes to ancient Vulcans (though the Sherlock thing could be real, I suppose, since Spock is also half human), Quark claims the phrase "discretion is the better part of valor" as a Ferengi ...


46

Ultimately, yes. Peace was too important. The alliance between the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire, which began with the Khitomer Accord of 2293 (the result of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country) is arguably the most important political alliance of the Alpha Quadrant. It ended a century of both active and implicit war between two ...


46

The reason Humans (technically the whole United Federation of Planets) and Klingons were at odds in the TOS era is not fully explained. According to Memory Alpha, the issues between the two stemmed from a "disasterous First Contact," however, the exact details of what happened are not made clear. There are a few points where the different Trek series are ...


45

The Klingon Empire appears to have been intended to be a member of the Federation in TNG; however, in Season 3 the writers ret-conned that idea to allow them to be aggressors again. This is a screen capture from Season 1 showing a United Federation of Planets logo on a Klingon bridge. Other than this screen grab, and the conversation cited by the OP, it ...


43

In some circles, the use of contractions is considered too informal and dare I say, sloppy English. Worf, being a bit of a stuffed shirt would gravitate to the more 'formal' English speech patterns. Also, the more formal sounds a bit more forceful and aggressive. Note the proclamation, "I will stop you!" as opposed to the more plaintive, "I'll stop you!" ...


42

In Enterprise: Judgement, we learn that the Klingon Empire has been in very serious (intellectual) decline for generations, culminating in the present day where adolescent Klingons view science, engineering, teachering and lawyering as professions to be avoided due to a perception that honour can only be earned through warfare: ARCHER: There are other ...


38

In TNG:Firstborn, K'mtar suggests Alexander Rozhenko (who is in 3/4 a Klingon), that he should try going swimming in the lake near his uncle's (Kurn's) house. From Chakoteya: K'MTAR: Have you ever been to the Homeworld? ALEXANDER: No. K'MTAR: I think you would like it there. At your uncle's house there is a lake you can swim in that is so clear you ...


37

According to the "Klingon Art of War" by Keith R.A. DeCandido, the Klingon gods were surprisingly mortal. They apparently lived in a 'great tree'. One of them made first contact with the Klingons some 2-3000 years before the time of Kahless (and approximately a thousand years before the arrival of the Hur'Q). Their initial demand was for food, which the ...


36

The production notes for the Klingon warships designed for the original TOS series Klingons stated: The goal of the Klingon warship was battle, not comfort. They did not have exploration ships like the Federation, all of their ships were created for war. Food was barely edible, crews were always training, a lust for combat was always promoted. Honor and ...


36

My answer is isomorphic to that of @Himarm in some parts, but differs in others. My answer also begins with: The Klingon Empire appears to have been intended to be a member of the Federation in TNG timeline; however, in Season 3 the writers retconned that idea... But my answer differs on ...to allow them to be aggressors again. To be more precise, ...


35

Somewhere fairly early on, someone at Pocket Books realized that if Marc Okrand really had developed an entire conlang for Klingon, they could probably sell a dictionary based on it. The Klingon Dictionary was first published in 1985 - before TNG and many of the films - and the reissued in 1992 - five years after TNG started, one year after The Undiscovered ...


31

This is addressed in the Klingon Bird of Prey Owners' Workshop Manual. In short, Klingon vessels do have escape pods that can be used when the ship is on the verge of destruction and the escaping crew have no more purpose being on the ship. Contrary to popular belief Birds-of-Prey are routinely fitted with escape pods. The Klingon’s willingness to die in ...


29

Although technically Data is not giving the headbutt but receiving it, only the Klingon Captain Nu'Daq was hurt in the episode TNG: The Chase.


28

While I'm not sure about 22nd-Century vessels, later Klingon vessels did indeed have escape pods. During The Dominion War (specifically in DS9 S07E17 "Penumbra"), Worf spent several days adrift in an escape pod launched from the IKS Rotarran. The comment about Klingons actually using escape pods, however, may be accurate. Use of an escape pod would be ...


27

At the time "Trials and Tribble-ations" was shot, nobody involved with the production of Trek had figured out an in-universe way to explain changes in makeup and costume budgets between 1966 and 1979 (when the Klingon cranial ridges first appeared in TMP). So at that time, there was no in-universe answer. Giving Worf the "we don't discuss it with outsiders"...


26

These are serpent worms, commonly called gagh by the Klingons. There are different types of gagh, such as one kind that jumps, one that wriggles, and one that has feet. Klingons usually eat it alive, but it can also be served stewed, or cold. It's a safe bet that the actors were not eating real worms. If anything, it was probably spaghetti. From the Star ...


26

Searching Chakoteya (the go-to site for all Star Trek and Doctor Who transcripts) gave only six results in the whole of Star Trek for the phrase "good day to die" (in quotes). In none of its occurrences is this phrase followed by anything close to "Then our enemies are fortunate". Searching for "enemies are fortunate" or "enemies are lucky" (both in quotes) ...


25

In Star Trek: Generations during a Holodeck adventure when Worf is promoted, he is given the challenge of retrieving his hat that is suspended high above an outstretched plank. Riker comments: He won't make it no one ever has. However, Worf is indeed successful. Riker then proceeds to have the computer remove the plank. This causes Worf to fall into ...


25

Yes. The best example I know of is that in Deep Space Nine's "The House of Quark", it's a major plot point that one house is scheming to take over another for their material wealth. QUARK: Very clever. Very clever indeed. D'Ghor has manipulated your family's holdings, devalued the lands you hold, and he is the principal creditor on Kozak's outstanding ...


24

A wikipedia article claims that in the audio commentary on Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, Special Collectors Edition, the director N. Meyer claims the idea for having the Klingons claim Shakespeare as their own was based on Nazi Germany's attempt to claim the Bard as German before World War II.


24

I am quite sure the Klingons didn't know English. Firstly, it is logical to suppose that the proportion of Klingons who knew English was about the same as the proportion of Humans who knew Klingon. And as seen in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, nobody on the Enterprise spoke Klingon well. Secondly, the intonation and word choice of the Klingon ...


24

According to the film's official novelisation, the probe had (somehow) made its way into Klingon space. No explanation is given as to quite how it managed this feat, although we do know of other pre-warp objects from Earth that have traveled suspiciously large distances and non-warp-capable ships that still managed to achieve warp velocities. THE ANCIENT ...


23

Yes, in the episode "Ethics" we see Worf's feet. Whether these are typical or abnormal is never explained but the similarity in shape and size (along with the symmetry of the bump above the fifth digit) would suggest that they are. This ties in quite nicely with the Klingon anatomical model designed by senior Trek 'Visual Effects Producer' (and Klingon ...


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