129

In the TOS Book The Kobayashi Maru Cadet Montgomery Scott fails the Kobayashi Maru and is moved from the Command Stream to the Engineering Stream. "Fail" is a nuanced word however. The linked book is a really interesting read, with 4 different takes on what passing the Kobayashi Maru actually means. Apologies if I've mis-remembered anything as it's been 25 ...


74

In the Kelvin Timeline, Kirk failed the Kobiyashi Maru and keeps retaking it. (In the film, it’s implied that he’s making the rest of the bridge crew take a couple of hours to act out their roles in the simulation each time, and that he’s done this over and over, an unusually large number of times.) He doesn’t even pretend to be taking it seriously or in ...


52

In the New Frontier novel Stone and Anvil, we are told of future captain Mackenzie Calhoun's "solution" - he concluded that there was a high probability that the freighter crew was in on it, and that if they were by some fluke innocent and were captured, they would prefer a quick death to torture, and therefore fired on the Kobayashi Maru himself, destroying ...


35

The Kobayashi (formerly Kobiashi) Maru was named after Star Trek II scriptwriter Jack Soward's next-door neighbours. "I'm not the age I am and I'm not settled. I've still got an awful lot do accomplish. I don't want to just settle in and be permanent anywhere," he says. "There's a lot of me philosophically in the script. I don't believe in the ...


34

I'm not sure which order they come, but as far as publishing dates, the first victory was in The Bottom Line, which was printed in "Strange New Worlds III". This was the more interesting of the two -- purely tactical as far as I can tell. Although whether he won or not is somewhat dubious. With the tractor beam, he slingshots the Kobayashi Maru ...


29

Yes, at least one cadet was expelled from the Academy for failing the no-win scenario. In the TOS episode "Bread and Circuses", the Enterprise discovers the wreckage of the Merchant Marine ship SS Beagle. Captain Kirk remembers its captain (R.M. Merik) as an old friend from their academy days: Kirk: We attended Starfleet Academy at the same time. He ...


22

First, a little background. The "Kobayashi Maru" test is as follows: A lone Federation starship is patrolling the Neutral Zone border. The ship receives a distress call from a transport ship - the Kobayashi Maru - from deep inside the Zone. The Maru should not be trespassing where it is, but claims to be under attack from the Klingons. A "winning" ...


18

Yes, there are reactions which makes the test automatically a fail. Inability to decide: Either you decide that you cannot save the Kobayashi Maru or you try to save them. If you stare paralysed on the screen because there is no right decision and cannot come to a decision even if the crew urge you, you are per definition unfit for command. Violating ...


14

My understanding of the situation is as follows: 1 - The KM is a civilian vessel, not a Starfleet warship, hence why it's entering of the neutral zone was not considered a potential act of war. Much like the fact that we can travel to other countries but sending over a gunship filled with heavily armed marines is usually frowned upon. 2 - At this time, yes ...


13

From Memory Alpha: In March of 2285, Saavik was a Starfleet cadet and, while mentored by Spock at Starfleet Academy, she underwent the Kobayashi Maru scenario. Despite an in-depth awareness of Starfleet regulations, she chose – during the test – to violate the Neutral Zone Treaty by venturing across the Klingon Neutral Zone in an attempt to rescue the ...


13

James T. Kirk: Bones, doesn't it bother you that no one's ever passed the test? Leonard 'Bones' McCoy: Jim, it's the Kobayashi Maru. NO one passes the test, and no one goes back for seconds, let alone thirds. There's a difference between knowing that no one has passed, and knowing that a test is impassable. Bones' recognizes that the lack of ...


11

I am fairly certain no one literally knew it was unbeatable, just that no one had. To the creater (Spock), he obviously knew what the test was for. I'm not so sure anyone else did (until they were told or figured it out later). In the 2009 movie remember, Kirk had to ask what the purpose of the test was. It's like military training. The drill sergents aren'...


11

The answer available, for in-universe explanation is, not canon: Kobayashi Maru was an actual freighter The incident was non-canonically presented in the novel entitled Star trek Enterprise: Kobayashi Maru by Micheal A. Martin and Andy Mangels. The freighter was lost in the Tezel-Oroko system, near the Federation-Klingon border in the year 2155. This was ...


11

To my best knowledge, we see so little of the Kobayashi Maru test in TV shows and movies, that there isn't any way to really tell. We do get to see a couple of other, similar tests in TNG: during Weasley's extry exam for Starfleet Academy, and Troi's test gain command during night shifts. Both tests come as a surprise to the tester the first time they are ...


8

It seems like all of the responses, and the original asker, interpret the Kobayashi-Maru as a test. However, the Kobayashi-Maru has been explained to be a lesson that is disguised as a test. It is explained by Spock that it is intended to give the candidate experience being in a no-win situation. Failing the scenario in a conventional way, which nearly ...


5

Strategema is not a no-win situation (to be fair, technically neither is the Maru); it is a competitive game of some sort. While the game is never explained in depth, the visuals make it look a little like Go, with territory control being key. However it also appears to be played in real time, and it appears that each finger controls some kind of input. ...


4

Noone knows it's designed to be unbeatable. The commander prototype that Starfleet seems to value is that of "I can succeed where all before me have failed". That would seem to encourage candidates to take the test anyway, even though the test has been surreptitiously designed to defeat all challengers. It could indeed be a bit messed up - cultivate a "I can ...


3

It's important to keep in mind that The screen above shows some navigation data not shown anywhere else in any Star Trek film or episode I'm aware of. The three circles represent the attitude of the ship with the course represented. I would expect this data can be shown at any time on any ship, but typically isn't shown on the main screen of the bridge. It'...


2

This isn't a difficult question Data is logical and emotionless, he would simply play the scenario with the best chance of success (even if it was hopeless), he would simply try and fail like everyone else. The test has to have some weakness or everyone would just retreat. I.E if you were in a shuttle surrounded by 8 borg cubes - you would just run. So its ...


2

Canonically, we don't know for certain that Data took the test but we can assume that as Second Officer on the flagship of the Federation, he took it. Since the Kobayashi Maru is intended to be unwinnable, we can presume that he didn't succeed Moving down the canon scale, Data and Picard administer the test (to Wesley) in the book TNG: Boogeymen. After ...


1

In The Auto Biography of James T. Kirk this is stated as Kirk is trying to find a way to beat the test. The details were a closely guarded secret, and the honor code of the academy stated that you couldn't discuss the test with anyone who hadn't taken it yet. But, as it turned out, many in the academy did not observe the honor code, and the details became ...


1

The only one listed as officially failing I have ever seen is Montgomery Scott, because he cheated. He knew there was a bug in the way Klingon shields were being used in the simulation vs real life and took advantage, destroying hundreds of Klingon ships. Starfleet confronted him about it citing a book that he wrote himself. It is in Julia Ecklar's The ...


1

In which film series? In The Wrath of Khan, it's clearly explained that the intended purpose of the exercise is to see how people perform in a no-win scenario, and when facing death. This is fairly interesting and makes sense in a number of ways. Defeat and disaster happen sometimes, and one might prefer one's officers to have experienced this possibility, ...


1

The Kobayashi Maru test is one to test that the candidate doesn't freeze up, not do immoral things, and will try to carry out orders the best they can. You don't pass or fail based on whether you accomplish the mission. You pass or fail based on what you do to try to accomplish the mission. This is why Kirk passed. He didn't do anything "immoral" or anything ...


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