24

I'll propose Pakuni from 1974 Land of the Lost series. Since they were primitive apemen - a 300 word language on a technicality has the best chance of being "complete". See http://lotl.popapostle.com/html/pakuni.htm Though obviously Star Trek III's Klingon dictionary and Tolkien's elf languages are more notable in other ways.


15

Ubbi Dubbi was created in 1972 for the PBS children's show Zoom. Because it is derived from English, it is a matter of opinion whether it counts for this question (i.e. what constitutes "creating" a language). On one hand, it is not completely artificial like Klingon or Tolkien languages. On the other hand, Ubbi Dubbi is as "complete" ...


11

"Most people" don't speak droidspeak. Only those that work around droids bother to learn it, and even then inexpertly. Notable characters who can understand droid (without a translator device) are; Luke “Artoo?” he asked, brightening, and a moment later the blue-and-white astromech rolled into view, chirping and whistling at length. “Yes,” Luke ...


9

According to Troy Kostur, the deaf actor who developed it (and played one of the Tusken Raiders), it is an in-universe language developed by the Tusken people named Tusken Sign Language, and he purposefully tried to avoid ASL to avoid it being a gloss. "I did research on the culture and environment of Tusken Raiders," says Kotsur. "My goal ...


8

This is what the author says: Teyks-kah-lan. First vowel is the sound in 'hey', second vowel is the 'a' in 'father', third vowel is the 'a' in 'sample'. This is not as precise as rendering it in IPA, but hopefully it helps. The "a in father" is (typically) a long vowel [ɑː] whereas the "a in sample" is short [æ], which seems consistent ...


8

Out of universe, no - Judoon is not a language that has been created with any particular care and there is no way to translate the Judoon heard in the television programme. There are a couple of Judoon 'translators' on the internet, and as far as I can tell, they are just a novelty. They each seem to use some kind of internal logic for the 'translation' ...


7

Probably the 1974 children’s TV series Land of the Lost, with the language Pakuni, created by UCLA linguist Victoria Fromkin. I take the question as asking about languages developed beyond isolated words or language games, into at least a rudimentary conlang (constructed language). Wikipedia has a handy list of conlangs in fiction. Digging into their ...


6

Following up to my comment, I found a tweet from the author, Arkady Martine (a pen-name for Dr Anna Linden Weller): Teixcalaanli is inspired by Nahuatl (... and Greek); Stationer is basically Space Armenian. I’m kinda a language nerd. So Teixcalaanli is indeed partially based on Nahautl - a language in the Uto-Aztecan familiy, spoken in Central Mexico.


4

Most people do not understand Binary (the droid language). It is very clear, for example, that Luke does not understand R2-D2’s speech in The Empire Strikes Back.* There are a number of instances that make clear. When the droids congratulate Luke on his recovery from the Wampa incident, C-3PO first speaks for himself, “Master Luke, Sir, it’s so good to ...


3

According to the show's creator, the word "Nor" just means that you're describing an object of some kind. Q. DS9 was formerly Terok Nor. An upcoming episode about another Cardassian station is "Empok Nor." And in "The Maquis," the Cardassian freighter Bok'Nor was destroyed. So: what does the Cardie word "Nor" mean?...


3

He is signing in Tusken Sign Language, which was developed by deaf actor Tory Kotsur, who also played one of the Tusken Raiders. RENCA DUNN: Kotsur mentioned that when the team got script, it mentioned sign language. One hearing person on the team knows sign language and that person mentioned that a deaf person should consult the sign language and become ...


2

Carroll himself tells us that many of the Jabberwocky words are portmanteaus, or two words (in Carroll’s case usually two rare or old words) stuck together. If we follow his lead and begin separating his words into their components, we may get a good idea of what he meant to say in his poem. For example “jabber” means to talk indistinctly, voluminously, or ...


1

There doesn't seem to be an explanation for this in either the 1970s TV show, or the DCEU movies. This has been addressed in the comics though... In the original Pre-Crisis / Earth-Two continuity, the Amazons were able to observe the outside world using a Magic Sphere, given to them by the goddess, Athena. HIPPOLYTE: Come, let me show you the Magic Sphere ...


1

The languages came first. J.R.R Tolkien was s philologist, and he loved languages. So he started creating a few himself. After a while, I suppose he realised these languages could be used, and he created a world (Middle Earth) and, for it, characters to speak the languages.


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