44

Scrooge's business partner, Marley, recommended Scrooge for redemption. This was a form of Marley's penance, to see Scrooge amend his ways and avoid the same fate as he. UPDATE: Some relevant passages of Marley's visit from Gutenberg Project [highlights/interpretations mine]: “It is required of every man,” the Ghost [Marley] returned, “that the spirit ...


38

Nolan says that he hasn't (intentionally) included a religious subtext to the film, but that some of the imagery, and definitely the soundtrack are inspired by "religiosity" in general. “Yeah, sorry about that…,” Nolan smiled, knowing Del Toro was referring to his painful attempts to get his dream project off the ground. Yet Nolan was more than ...


25

1. Leviathan Wakes The Leviathan is a sea monster in Judaism, most well known from its appearance in the Book of Job. The title refers to the waking of the long-dormant protomolecule from Phoebe, moon of Saturn. 2. Caliban's War Caliban is a half human, half monster character from Shakespeare's play The Tempest. The title refers to the project which ...


21

Up to the end of A Dance With Dragons, Jaime never has had a prophetic dream/vision concerning Wildfire. So this almost certainly refers to the hidden caches of Wildfire spread throughout King's Landing by the King Aerys II. This is reinforced by the end of the above quote: It was almost funny, but there was no one to share the joke. The hidden ...


14

As TLP wrote, I'm not sure there are always three components, and not all events are foreshadowed. But there are many events that are foreshadowed over the course of the series. One memorable example is the Red Wedding, which is heavily foreshadowed: Patchface sings about it in the prologue of ACOK: Dany sees a vision in the House of the Undying: Later in ...


14

Viewing Wikipedia's list of lies, Tyrion is engaging in a half-truth, with a bit of contextual lying thrown in for good measure. A half-truth is a deceptive statement that includes some element of truth. The statement might be partly true, the statement may be totally true but only part of the whole truth, or it may utilize some deceptive element, such as ...


14

One of the candidates is Russian folcloric character of Koschey the Deathless. It was formally present in written sources as far back as 12th century, but likely significantly predates that as an oral tradition. Sources to peruse: Wikipedia TVTropes list of Liches


13

LEGO Star Wars: Droid Tales: will tell the entire Star Wars saga – in the medium of Lego – from the perspective of R2-D2 and C-3PO, following the pair as they witness some of the most memorable (or in the case of the prequels, regrettably unforgettable) moments in the history of the Skywalker family album and the Star Wars galaxy. The new five-part series ...


12

Igor is a common name in countries which have slavic languages, I wouldn't read much into it for example if there was a British character named Richard you wouldn't automatically assume it's a reference to Richard Lionheart.


8

The two young Walders Frey at Winterfell play a game called King of the Crossing in which the King must hold to an oath unless he slips in the word "mayhaps" unnoticed. If you look at the interaction between Lord Frey and Robb & Catelyn right before the Red Wedding, Frey does just that- slips in a "mayhaps" when the Starks ask for food. Thus, it's not ...


7

An Architect What do the terms “Architect” and “Gardener” actually mean? According to George R.R. Martin, in a 2011 interview: Yeah, to some extent. I've always said there are – to oversimplify it – two kinds of writers. There are architects and gardeners. The architects do blueprints before they drive the first nail, they design the entire house, where ...


7

My immediate feeling would be Architect. The books are in general very tightly plotted, with an event-driven structure, rather than emerging from the actions and behavior of the main characters such as Harry Potter. Those few events driven by character tend to be fairly minor, like their behavior in seeking dance partners, but in general they're reacting to ...


7

Google's Ngram viewer is your friend. It searches inside books -- so it doesn't specify popular culture -- but it's a pretty good proxy, I think. The graph of zombie,zombies,Zombie,Zombies shows very few mentions before ~1925 a bump for about ten years, followed by a return to the previous low level an accelerating increase of 50% to 100% per decade If, ...


5

Stay tuned - there is a new C-3PO one-off comic in February that will explain his new red arm. POV uncertain at this time but that might be an answer. https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Star_Wars_Special:_C-3PO_1


4

I just leafed through a few books ("Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction", David Seeds likewise named "Companion to Science Fiction", Adam Roberts "Science Fiction" and even Suvins "Positions and Suppositions"). They all mention an "Golden Age" of Science Fiction, but do no use the term in any analytical fashion. Suvin puts the "Golden Age" in the range ...


3

With Silmarillion, Tolkien wanted to create a mythology similar to for example the Norse one, and that's what he considered his most important work. He wanted Silmarillion to be belivable, and so he didn't just produce the stories, but languages, maps, family trees, pantheons, races etc etc. The stories in The Hobbit and LotR weren't really planned to be ...


3

Molly is quite possibly the most important character in the book because she is the sounding pole by which we measure our own personal growth. When we read the book or see the movie when we are young, we tend to at first judge her by her appearance and manner. We wonder what is wrong with her, yelling at the unicorn like that. We certainly don't ...


3

'Mary Sue' is a meaningless phrase. It has so many definitions that it is useless as a term of criticism. It started out as a fanfiction term, to describe self-insert characters who warp the world of the story around themselves in such a way as to ruin the story. See, for example, A Trekkie's Tale, the parody fic that the term originated from. Under this ...


3

The basic term for it is "literary device". Everything else is a subtype of that. A literary device (or trope or motif) is simply something that an author uses to enhance the story and/or deliver the message that they want to deliver, or to produce a specific effect. Some examples are: Anthropomorphism - Giving human characteristics to inanimate objects - ...


3

I believe there was quite a sub-genre of "end of the world/humanity" stories from just after the end of WWII into the '60's. It does seem to have been fueled by a number of things, including the apparently endless "small" wars (Korean, the French and then Americans in Indochina, Jewish-Arab conflicts), which all served as proxies to the much feared big war ...


3

Forget the movies, go right to the source. I just started reading the original 'Frankenstein'... and was very surprised, when the name 'Nicolas Flamel' came up. Nicolas Flamel happens to be a real alchemist who was born at the right time (ca 1330 AD) to be THE Nicolas Flamel in Harry Potter. In addition to this, one of the things that Victor Frankenstein ...


3

There are many hints of Eddard's fate. As already pointed out, in the first chapter: Then in Chapter 27 as Eddard discusses the upcoming King's Tourney with the small council, Janos Slynt mentions: At the end of Chapter 32, Arya asks one of her father's guardsmen And he responds: There are other hints in addition to the ones mentioned above, such as ...


2

There was a comic written a while ago in the tales comics that was told from the perspective of the droid with the bad motivator. Skippy the Jedi droid.


2

If you recall, Ebenezer is left at school each year at Christmas and the hard lesson was learned. Yet, the redemption begins with his sister and her sacrifice who gifts Ebenezer and the world with his nephew. Yet Scrooge treats his birth and her death as another harsh lesson. It continues with the kindness and love of his fiance who releases him and she ...


2

"the illustrated man" Bradbury - at Google Scholar Example: August Derleth, 1952: ... Unquestionably in top place among contemporary American writers of sci- ence-fiction is Ray Bradbury, whose two collections, The Martian Chronicles and The Illustrated Man, stand head and shoulders above all other science-fiction in our time. Heinlein wept.


1

In the books they use "burn" to describe moving fast. Hard burn is used to describe when the ships are moving so fast it is uncomfortable to exist inside the ship. Cibola was one of the 7 cities of gold. Illis is a planet rich in rare, precious elements. Cibola burn is the race to capture Illis. Everyone wants to possess that planet and all her ...


1

There is an extensive "study guide" for Bradbury's 'Illustrated Man' available online here. It contains a synopsis of each chapter as well as; Literary Elements Character Analysis Plot Structure Analysis Theme Analysis Author's Style Important Quotations / Quotes and Analysis of Symbolism Motifs / Imagery / Symbols and Key Facts There's also a ...


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