Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
15

In support of Morawski's answer, which I agree with, I can point to another passage where the veil between the real and fictional worlds falls down: Tagomi, the Japanese businessman who is interested in antiques, while examining the iron jewel briefly "passes" to an alternate world which is similar to our own, where the post-war Japanese are discriminated ...


14

Both As far as the exclusion of Japanese sexual atrocities in particular goes--basically, nobody likes to think (much less write) about rape, and it adds an extra layer of horribleness to the story that's hard to deal with, both emotionally and as a writing problem--how much PTSD should victims display? Did any of them get pregnant? @Ross also points out ...


14

It appears that in the man in the high castle timeline the mountain was not finished in the 5th image you should be able to see at least part of the Roosevelt sculpture at the very least the hairline


11

In The Man in the High Castle the characters get a hint that the world that they are living in is fictional, and they get a glimpse of the truth. But Dick himself believed—or at least he described having a religious experience that revealed—something similar about our world: that we are still living in the first century, and that the twenty centuries of ...


11

At the end of the novel The Man in the High Castle, However, the novel also lacks a complete resolution: Philip K Dick always planned to go back to it and write a sequel some day. From this interview (emphasis mine): But then when it came time to close down the novel the I Ching had no more to say. And so there’s no real ending on it. I like to regard it ...


10

He suffers from Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHMD, FSHD or FSH)—originally named Landouzy-Dejerine2—is a usually autosomal dominant inherited form of muscular dystrophy (MD)3 that initially affects the skeletal muscles of the face (facio), scapula (scapulo) and upper arms (humeral). FSHD is the ...


10

I just compared both versions and there are no differences between them.


8

It's never explicitly stated that Smith was with the Nazis prior to the surrender of the Allies I'm not sure which particular conversation from episode six you're talking about. I have found only one in which they discuss the war (00:33:07): Wegener says: Nobody talks about the camps. Nobody talks about how many we exterminated. We got commendations ...


8

Speculation: I'm reminded of the scene from the HBO Miniseries "Band of Brothers" I'm from Eugene, Oregon too. Why are you in a Kraut uniform? Volksdeutsche. Come again? My family answered the call. All true Aryans should return to the Fatherland. From the Wikipedia article re: Volksdeutsche "During the early years of the ...


8

Assuming you're talking about scenes like the one in season 1 episode 8 (End of the World), where Juliana comes in late to work and is confronted by Kotomichi - he says "Shitsurei-shimasu." Juliana: "Mr. Kotomichi, please forgive me if I've done something to offend you." Kotomichi: "You have done nothing to offend me, Miss Crain. It is your presence. ...


8

@OrangeDog is correct -- it is heavily implied that Tagomi committed suicide. In Season 2, episode 8 (Loose Lips). Juliana in the parallel reality tells Tagomi But I ran after you, and I lost you in the fog by the bridge. I got scared. Scared? Scared that you jumped. Episode transcript


7

In Season Two, it is definitively revealed that he was with the Americans in WWII. In S2E05, he meets with Inspector Kido who questions him about a medal displayed in his office: Kido: The medal behind your desk. Might I examine it more closely? Smith: Be my guest. (Kido gets a closer look at the medal, which is dated 1942) Kido: The ...


7

Here's a still image from season 1, episode 9, “Kindness”: Enhanced: This is indeed German, and it says “Großes Reich,” which means “great reich/realm/empire.” The script is Fraktur (blackletter):


7

Juliana interprets the hexagram to mean that The Grasshopper Lies Heavy represents the truth — that Japan and Germany lost the war, and she inhabits a fictional construct. She does, in fact, occupy a fictional construct created by Dick — which he constructed by consulting the I-Ching. But the fictional construct of the world in The Grasshopper Lies Heavy is ...


7

It is heavily implied that the Tagomi in our reality committed suicide, due to the shame of his son marrying a gaijin. As far as his family is concerned, he disappeared after the fight where he smashed the cup. He's not confirmed to be dead, but they hope he might come back some day (and in a way, he does).


6

My take on the ending: After I Ching revelation that they are all living in a false reality, Juliana begins to see world as it is: the surroundings in the end look more-and-more like early 60's America of our reality, thus it is likely that Juliana walks out of false reality into our reality. This conclusion is supported by Mr. Tagomi's experience when he ...


6

In James Joyce's "Ulysses," Stephen Dedalus says, "History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Dick seems to see the reality in which we live in much that way. He once made a remark to the effect that reality doesn't live up to his standards. In TMITHC, the various horrors of life in an Axis-run world have a hallucinatory, nightmarish, ...


5

I think that Dick may also have been saying something about his own time (late 1950's and earlyt 60's). If Roosevelt had been assasinated perhaps post war America would have been different -- the world can turn on single events. During the early 60's the Civil Rights Movment was underway, and Viet Nam was happening. Yet in the book it's the Nazi Germans who ...


5

I'm a bit late to this discussion. I'd just like to add that according to Wikipedia Philip K Dick intended to write a sequel. Along side the "Dickian" observations about the nature of reality there is also a very powerful conventional narrative. Operation Dandelion the Nazi Plot to launch a preemptive strike against Japan is played as a conventional ...


4

I have not read the book yet, but a full text search for "Okamura" and "Yakuza" got me nowhere. Looks like much of that storyline is "whole cloth." Therefore, we only have what we see in the show to guide us, and there isn't much; the Yakuza appear out of nowhere, and disappear just as easily. So we're stuck with speculation based on two episodes. ...


3

How about a straightforward meaning to it. The inevitable war between Japan and Germany leaves them both in ruins with America ascendant.


3

I agree with most of everyone on here. Both Juliana and Tagomi glimpse into another reality where the U.S. did win WWII as outlined in The Grasshopper Lies Heavy. However, I don't believe that this new reality is real and true, while the reality experienced by the characters throughout the rest of the novel is necessarily false or fictional. Rather they both ...


2

The ending just means that Japan and Germany did lose the war. Therefore, the repression that the characters are feeling is not due to Nazi rule, but rather that our own world, the one in which the US and Britain won, is a world of 'Nazi repression'. i.e. the characters are trapped in these subjective feelings.


2

From my interpretation P.K. Dick extend somehow the principle/experiment in which a particle like photon is detected through both slits ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment ) to macro-level ... including socio-political enviroment so basically the ideea would be that every time when a crucial event takes place in our history there are ( at ...


2

I think many have made an assumption, which I do not know that Dick had intended: The other universe that she sees is real, but that does not necessarily mean that hers is fake. Could not both realities be true, as in the many worlds theory (aka parallel universes, etc.? It seems to me that she sees one universe, which she interprets the I, Ching to confirm ...


2

Immediately following World War II, The United States and the Soviet Union were at odds during the Cold War. In this alternate reality where the Axis powers won the war, The Third Reich and the Empire of Japan would have likely turned against each other in their own Cold War. These "unclaimed parts" are likely buffer zones which were agreed on by both powers ...


1

Following the peace conference of 1947, the defeated US government was allowed to form two independent nations in the Rocky mountains, between territories occupied by the Deutsch Reich and the Nipponese Empire. These were weak economically dependant nations with no military, and little in the way of government. That's the 'buffer zone' in the American ...


1

In the series, it is made clear that there are many alternate timelines to the one the plot takes place in. (e.g. the one in which San Francisco is nuked because WWIII wasn't averted by Smith.) That increases the probability of one of them being our own.


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