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The Marring of Arda was intentional The idea of Arda Marred (as it's commonly referred to) is a direct reflection of the downfall of Man in the bible and the imperfections of the world. Similar to the bible, the history of Arda Marred ends with an apocalyptic event — Dagor Dagorath — after which the People's of Ëa begin living in what is known as Arda ...


26

Middle-earth In Middle-earth throughout all time it is almost certainly Thangorodrim: And looking out from the slopes of Ered Wethrin with his last sight he beheld far off the peaks of Thangorodrim, mightiest of the towers of Middle-earth... The Silmarillion, Chapter 13: The Return of the Noldor In this case "towers" almost certainly means ...


8

In all probability, the two tallest mountains in the history of Middle-earth (and, in fact, all of Arda) were the two pillars* Helkar in the North and Ringil in the South. These were built by the Valar to hold to the two lamps—Illuin and Ormal, respectively—that illuminated the Spring of Arda. The pillars reached up to the stars in the sky, and their ...


8

TL;DR – It’s not so much that Boromir is “un-Numenorean” compared to Denethor/Faramir, it’s more that Faramir, like Denethor, is a throwback to the Númenóreans from before the Akallabêth. Boromir, is more representative of other Gondorian lords of their time The sons of Denethor II, Boromir and Faramir, are descended through their father from the Steward of ...


6

One could argue, from an ontological perspective, that Eru (God) allowed evil to exist in the first place, in order to ultimately allow an example to be set for the others not to do evil. Free will (or the illusion thereof) is the greatest gift given to the living. Like a kind father, Eru does not destroy Melkor when this latter first shows his true nature. ...


5

I think you answered your own question. But I'll add my 2 cents here. As you probably know, Westron is based on Adûnaic, that is, the language of Númenor. Helge Kåre Fauskanger quotes David Salo, who he said suggests that Westron has a phonology very similar to late Adûnaic. And Adûnaic was intended to have a "faintly Semitic flavour" or style, as ...


2

We don't know that much about Rhûn but I think it's safe to say that it is Middle-earth's equivalent to central Asia. The Wainriders seem to be inspired by cultures like Scythians and how they fight wars (which was discussed in the comments under the question). Also, In the early drafts of The Hobbit Bilbo does mention China existing in the east: to the ...


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