43

Although it may sound like a cop-out, the answer is that it was because the Force didn't tell him to. Qui-Gon Jinn was drawn to the only junkyard in town that had a compatible hyperdrive. When faced with an apparent obstacle, he simply waits for the Force to present him with a solution. Presumably when you're a powerful Jedi these kinds of coincidences ...


38

In the late 90s I read a short story (probably written much earlier) "Unwelcome Tenant" by Roger Dee, first published in Planet Stories, Summer 1950, available at the Internet Archive. If you read it in the '90s, it was probably in the anthology Fifty Short Science Fiction Tales edited by Isaac Asimov and Groff Conklin. in which an astronaut on a mission ...


37

I read this story sometime between 1989 and 1991 in a SF&F magazine (Asimov's Science Fiction? The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction? Amazing Stories?) "Behind the Barrier", a short story by Stephen Kraus. As far as the ISFDB knows it was never reprinted, but appears only on pp. 141-159 of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, December ...


25

By a space probe in The Inner Light By a mind control game in The Game By Sarek in Sarek By "Kieran MacDuff" (a Satarran) in Conundrum By Data/Paxans in Clues


20

You're describing Harrison Bergeron (1995). Everyone wears an IQ suppressing headband and everything's very '1950s'. Harrison: Last night, seeing those programs I realized that...Everything looks like in the 1950's. Is it intentional? John Klaxon: Rule number 1: Everything is intentional. The U.S. was happier in that decade, at least people who lived at ...


19

Is it Stephen R. Donaldson's Gap Series? It starts off with an ugly and evil space pirate walking into a bar with a beautiful woman and gets complicated, dark and (in one scene) nauseating. I think it ends with a galaxy-spanning threat involving several alien species. The woman, Morn Hyland, suffers from gap-sickness - a mental aberration caused by ...


14

Stanisław Lem's The Futurological Congress has chemically induced "realities" to cover up poverty/government failures (even if they turn out to be a dream-within-a-dream / hallucination-inside-a-hallucination thing). The (quite short) book is from 1971 (as am I, so I'm reluctant to say that it's "very old", but it still seems a good match).


14

Thanks very much to the people who suggested Harrison Bergeron (1995). The memory of somebody watching his death but - wearing a headset - being too stupid to know why they are upset (Harrison's father) is strong. Also the final scene of rebellious youths taking off their headsets and watching his speech.


13

I suspect this is "A Bowl of Biskies Makes a Growing Boy" by Raymond F. Jones. Summary from this review site: Our young hero in the near future notices that all the foods that he eats have one ingredient in common. Curious, he tries to discover what that ingredient does. Not only do his investigations come to naught, a very suspicious accident occurs ...


13

Believe that's the three part episode Babel One, United and The Aenar. The Romulans capture an Aenar (an Andorian sub-species) who they use (forcibly) to telepathically control a Romulan ship capable of disguising itself as whatever type of vessel the Romulans choose. In Babel One, it's disguised as an Andorian ship and attacks the Enterprise. The United ...


12

The story is "Second Dawn" by Arthur C. Clarke, originally published in Science Fiction Quarterly in 1951 A full copy of the text can be found here


11

Pretty sure this is a duplicate of this question; Novel with psychic parasites from Earth. Originally, a novella by Jack Vance, The Brains of Earth, published in 1966.The protagonist, a scientist named Paul Burke finds out about the parasites, attached to people's heads. Crushing a parasite on the head forms a barrier to other parasites. The people with ...


9

In the canon comic Star Wars: Darth Vader #1, Vader is on Tatooine talking with someone highly resistant to Jedi mind tricks. When this person asks him if he is trying to use Jedi mind tricks on him, Vader answers: Mind tricks are not of the dark side We prefer force. and force chokes him. From how it sounds there, Sith can do mind tricks but prefer the ...


9

The upper picture is of the Cybermen from Doctor Who, potentially from season 2 given the name of the file. They certainly seem similar to the design used in the classic serial; Tomb of the Cyberman


9

Le Mutant? (The Mutant, 1978, France) From Wikipedia, translated: The various nations of the world have decided to make peace and destroy their weapons, while society's control over all activities through video surveillance is increasing. A mysterious scientist leads this pacifist movement through these Peace Legions. But the apparition of a Mutant, ...


9

This looks like "Murder Will In" by Frank Herbert. The being you refer to was actually a symbiotic pair sentience, whose two members are identified by "Tegas" and "Bacit". You can find some pages of that in Google Books' "The Collected Stories of Frank Herbert". This is the section where the "invaded" being, Joe Carmichael, that Tegas/Bacit has just ...


8

As Richard said, those guys in the first shot are Cybermen from the show Doctor Who--the shot with the weird device, and the shot of it being put on someone's head, are from the story "The Moonbase", see the bottom of the page here for a similar shot (the device is part of the process of converting people into cybermen, similar to the Borg from Star Trek). ...


8

Possible you're looking for Joe Haldeman's Tool of the Trade, a 1987 novel about a scientist who develops an ultrasonic device that makes people hyper-suggestible. Nicholas Foley, the scientist, has his girlfriend strip under the influence of the device. He's involved in the spy game, because of this device and being a soviet sleeper agent. The castrated ...


8

Parts of this sound like Scanners III: The Takeover. It was made in 1992 starts with the brother accidentally pushing a friend off a balcony and putting himself into exile features a telepathic woman whose medication makes her psychopathic said (brunette) woman, enjoying breakfast on a balcony, makes a pigeon explode in the following clip (warning, pigeon ...


8

I found it, Nightmare City 2035. It was filmed in Bulgaria at 2007, so I thought that it was from the late 90s. Good plot and ideas, but bad anything else. Not worth a second glance. The future. The corrupt regime broadcasts the illusion of a beautiful city to the chip in your head, when in fact the city is in ruins. The rebels know the truth and seek to ...


7

That sounds like the Homecoming Saga (A trilogy) by Orson Scott Card. It starts out in a very ancient city (40 million years) on a world where the people are kept from developing along certain warlike technological lines by a mind control satellite, whose breakdown forms a major plot point. For instance, magnetic levitation is an available technology, but ...


7

No canon answer. From the books, we can learn that: A Confessor's touch removes something of a person's self. As the magic takes it away (to the Underworld), the person touched is an empty shell, totally devoted to the Confessor in a form of unconditional love*. A Confessor's touch does not go away when she dies, a person touched may not survive such a ...


7

This is The Shadow (1994) Our hero fights a Mongol descendant of Genghis Khan with a fancy flying psychic knife called the "Phurba".


7

Niven, Known Space, stories involving the Slavers? One of the stories was adapted for animated Star Trek. Alien. Empire (dead by the time of the story, however). Psi-amplifier technology.


7

Is it possibly 2081? It's a short film adaptation of Harrison Bergeron. I also don't see Terrence Knox listed among the cast, but perhaps the poster was mistaking the identity? Here's a trailer: Also, it may not be a match to what was described because


6

That would be The Promise of God by Michael Flynn. It's no longer on his website, but he writes briefly about it here and you can hear a reading of it at Clarkesworld. The central idea is that the use of magic destroys the conscience, such that the main character mage is no longer able to distinguish right from wrong. I haven't read it in a while, so some ...


6

Watto didn't want to part with Anakin so I don't imagine it would have mattered what Qui-Gon had; he could have brought anything to Watto and it's unlikely that he would have accepted. Watto was willing to gamble Anakin only because he had a weighted set of dice. When Qui-gon used his powers to make it land on blue, Watto was mad but had to accept it. Qui-...


6

According to Hamilton's biography in Wikipedia Star Kings was published in 1949. That was almost 20 years after the beginning of the pulp science fiction market in the US. That would be a long time for nobody to think of aliens with mind control powers. As I remember E.E. Smith's Lensman series starting with Galactic Patrol (1937) featured humans and ...


6

John Carter of Mars (1912) features this for telephaty. Martians can't read John Carter's mind while he can read theirs just as easily as they can each other. No explanation is ushered that I know of. In Larry Niven's Known Space universe (1964-1975) Pak Protectors are immune to Thrintun mind control, due to their multilobed brain structure. An earlier ...


6

Poison Ivy, at the very least, is able to control Superman as seen here: Source: Batman #611 (March, 2003)


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