34

Jake Sisko Ben and Jennifer Sisko have a different marriage / separation timeline in the Mirror universe, and Jake does not have a Mirror counterpart. Appearances list: (listed as 71 appearances) Reference: "Jake Sisko", Memory Alpha (note: Jake was not 'impersonated' by an alien, but was possessed by a wormhole alien, but all the characters knew it was ...


30

As far as we can tell, it's the same Mirror Universe Though it's possible there are at least two. The first is the one we initially visit in "Mirror, Mirror", which is clearly the same one we later visit in Deep Space Nine; the DS9 episode "Crossover" has Intendant Kira mention the events of "Mirror, Mirror" as a matter of ...


18

It's just an alternate universe. The "Mirror" universe is just a name, based on the title of the original episode. The Point of Departure (PoD) is when Zefram Cochrane murdered the Vulcan who made first contact with Earth, leading the humans to steal the ship and subjugate Vulcan en route to creating the Terran Empire. As such, the Vulcans were still logical ...


17

Isn't that exactly what does in Discovery? He was obsessed with and manipulated events so that they would return to the mirror universe together.


16

This was addressed in an interview with showrunner Brannon Braga. In short, they recognised that the mirror universe episode in TOS was a fan favourite and didn't want to make something that compared unfavourably. However, there was a specific line they never crossed. In response to a question on why they never did a Next Generation mirror universe episode, ...


15

Jokingly - The ship computer Star Treks' original series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, and Voyager all have one actor in common: Majel Barrett-Roddenberry (wife of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry) Always the voice of the ship, even when the ship wasn't a ship (hologram, mind game, recreation, etc). Slightly more serious would be Lwaxana Troi....


14

Guinan Not only has Guinan never (afaik) appeared on a holodeck as a hologram, when we see parallel universes (like in Yesterday's Enterprise), she is the only one aware that the universe has changed, and retains the memory of those events as well.


13

The USS Defiant (NCC-1764) has made two prior appearances on two different Star Trek shows. It first appeared in the original series, in the season 3 episode "The Tholian Web". The central conflict of that episode is that the Defiant is being pulled into a bizarre spatial anomaly, and it disappears completely by the end: Scotty: Then your fears ...


12

There's at least two instances in Deep Space Nine, at least sort of. In Through The Looking Glass, Sisko-prime was brought to the mirror universe in order to speak to his late wife's counterpart. He was able to use his influence as her husband's counterpart to persuade her to switch sides and join the rebellion. Memory Alpha summary. In the "mirror ...


11

Never addressed in canon. Unfortunately, there is no canon information that answers your question. The uniqueness of the mirror universe amongst parallel universes is never addressed in the episodes themselves, nor has this topic been specifically addressed by writers or producers, either in the TOS era or TNG era. As far as I am aware, it is also not ...


10

I'm going to go out on a limb here: Yes, it is limited to this universe. There is no direct canonical evidence for this, but a great deal of indirect evidence. As I bring these examples up, please bear in mind that (various poorly-written episodes notwithstanding) Starfleet personnel are normally expected to give their lives to uphold the Prime Directive. ...


10

Main Canon Within the main Trek Series and films, there's zero indication of a Mirror Universe Borg society. It probably exists, but we simply don't get to see it. EU Canon. In the weird and wacky EU Canon, the Mirror Universe Borg are presided over by a Borg King. Deep in the bowels of his mechanical hive, shielded by overlapping layers of multigenerative ...


9

Gowron Gowron was a recurring character in TNG and DS9, appearing in 12 episodes. I cannot find a single instance where the character Gowron appeared as anyone but himself. Robert O'Reilly did appear in several Star Trek episodes as another character entirely and not as Gowron or in costume as Gowron. Robert O'Reilly on Memory Alpha Gowron on Memory ...


8

Short answer: probably not. But maybe. But probably not. From memory-alpha: Dating divergence The credits sequence for the mirror universe Star Trek: Enterprise television series used footage of battles going back at least to the "Age of Sail". The mirror Phlox noted that the "great works" of literature in both universes were roughly the ...


8

While the statement quoted in Valorum's answer certainly serves as a justification, it sounds like a quite idealized line of reasoning. In particular, the quoted text appears to have originally been published in that article in 20171, literally decades after TNG had been produced, and therefore may well be a retroactive explanation. Instead, I'd like to ...


8

While actress Nicole de Boer claims, "I've always worn my hair like this..." in the Deep Space Nine Companion, I would take this with a grain of salt. She started playing Ezri in autumn 1998, but in most of her roles in 1997 and prior, she had shoulder-length hair, kept straight and down with no bangs / fringe. For instance, here she is in the classic ...


8

There's very little direct info on the Terran Empire's birth in canon. I'd lean towards the theory that the timelines diverged long before First Contact, and that the Empire may have its roots in the Roman Empire (Terran is derived from the Latin word for Earth, Kirk given the title "Caesar," etc.). So we don't know what technological differences there were ...


8

(I'd prefer to make this a comment, but it's too long.) I haven't seen "Crossover" and don't remember "Mirror, Mirror" very well, but there is a way to make this work-- at least well enough for a soft science fiction setting like "Star Trek". Suppose there are many universes, and a mechanism that allows people to jump from one to another on rare occasions. ...


7

Burnham's comment in the previous episode ("The Wolf Inside"), regarding the lower quality of light in the mirror universe, gives support for different evolutionary adaptations between the two human lines.


6

The core question ("Why does peace and reform necessarily result in weakness?") isn't exclusively sci-fi so to speak and is somewhat opinion-based, but I'll bite anyway. As far as Star Trek is concerned, I don't think there is a canonical answer that goes deeper than the quotes that are already in the question, but here is some reasonable ...


6

This is discussed in the DS9 episode you mentioned; Crossover. Kira II indicates that in the Mirror Universe, all transporters were comprehensively redesigned specifically in order to prevent the same accident from occurring. By comparison, transporters in the datum universe weren't changed at all. This evidently allows mono-directional travel when the same ...


6

Tribbles. They have been in 12 episodes or movies. And they are always tribbles. As a tribble reproduces through parthenogenesis (dividing itself), every tribble is a branch of the ur-tribble. Hear us coo, and despair.


6

A combination of several factors: First universal travel is not trivial despite how easy main characters make it seem. Second the knowledge of universal travel is most likely classified. Third while we may view the mirror universe as a bad place to those that were born there it is home, you mention mirror O’Brien he could have left but he did not because ...


5

"Junior" Q mentions going to fluidic space in the Voyager episode Q2. So I'd think fluidic space doesn't seem a problem for Q.


5

Assuming it really was Q in Tapestry and not God posing as Q, then Q, played by John Delancie appeared in 8 episodes of TNG, 1 episode of DS9 and 3 episodes of Voyager. There has never been a hologram or other representation of Q. The only potential hiccup is in in the Voyager episode Q2 in which Q takes the form of a Chokuzan commander and is played by a ...


5

This discrepancy isn't explained in-universe within the shows. It falls to the EU novels that followed to answer the question, that cloaks that had previously been seen had become obsolete. It's not so much that they don't exist, but rather that everyone can see through them with such ease that they're no longer considered to 'cloak' anything. If anything, ...


4

The true mirror between the "prime" universe and the "mirror" universe isn't a physical inversion. If it were, you might expect to see Kirk as a female comm officer and Uhura as a male captain. Perhaps the Enterprise would be a seafaring vessel rather than a spacefaring one. Instead, the true surprise and shock of the crossovers come not from the physical ...


4

The Mirror Universe's Earth was even more barbaric than our Earth. Human nature was less kind. This was reflected throughout the history of Mirror Earth. Recall that in one of the episodes, one of Shakespeare's works viewed barbarism in a good light. "Mirror" is a loosely used term. Not everyone or thing was exactly the opposite of our universe. Vulcans ...


4

This is more into the philosophy behind it than anything direct from canon - but if you think about it, it was quite remarkable in the first recorded instance of a crossover resulting in our Kirk replacing a mirror-Kirk on a mirror-Enterprise crewed with mirror-crew belonging to a mirror-Federation. He could have just as easily crossed over into a universe ...


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