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130

My interpretation was a little different than yours. When other characters try to move Mjolnir, it doesn't move at all. When Captain America tries to move it, it moves. I think he probably doesn't pick it up, because he knows this is supposed to be a light-hearted moment, and he doesn't want to cause Thor any embarrassment, or cause conflict. Now he knows ...


103

At the beginning of the movie Thor, Mjolnir is not enchanted. It's just Thor's war hammer, built for him by whoever makes Asgardian weapons. He uses it because it's his, with no other particular requirements. After the fiasco with the Frost Giants, Odin places an enchantment on the weapon -- this is what he's doing when he whispers into the hammer, just ...


79

I've heard people say they thought it was because when he tried to pick it up, it was for the wrong reason. They were playing a game in the scene, trying to see if anyone could pick it up. People speculate if it was for a more serious reason, instead of a game/showy reason like in the scene, he would pick it up. We know in comics he has picked it up before, ...


62

Spider-Man does not grab the hammer in flight. He webs it as it flies by, and it pulls him along. He isn't physically trying to wield it (by grabbing the handle). It can be seen quickly here: Without an actual screen cap from the movie, I present you with this video.


54

There are certainly a few examples from the comics: Thor uses Mjölnir to hammer a shaky pillar back into the ground in Thor #267 He uses his hammer to build a trench in Avengers #98 He also uses his hammer to build a lava channel in Marvel Team-Up #26


47

There's an interview of Russell Bobbitt, Hollywood prop master, about that in this Screenrant article. There are actually several props, depending on the nature of the scene it's in. Rubber, fiberglass, you name it. So how many hammers are usually on set? You see them flip it around and obviously it seemed lighter and then you see the real one and it's ...


44

Vision. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, Thor uses Mjolnir to bring Vision to life. It is a loose definition of "build" but I would consider this to be what Odin had in mind. Unfortunately, building is usually not as exciting as destruction, so it is less likely to be portrayed on screen in general.


41

The key here is that the Mjolnir we see in Avengers: Endgame is from the past/a different timeline. I believe it comes from the Thor: The Dark World time, so 2013, whereas the events of Thor: Ragnarok take place in 2017 and so Odin had not died yet with respect to that Mjolnir’s enchantment. Objects taken out of their timelines still function as they did in ...


41

It was indeed a “test” for Thor to see if he would become worthy and so worthy to rule Asgard and return. We get a hint at this later on when Odin is talking to Frigga about it. Frigga: You can bring him back. Odin: No. His fate is in his own hands now. Thor To me this reads as Odin saying it’s up to Thor to change his ways and become worthy. Plus he casts ...


38

Captain America COULD be worthy, but in that moment, NOT worthy enough to wield the hammer. When Mjolnir has been wielded by others, it is usually a moment of extreme peril and then the "almost worthy" can level up, temporarily to become "worthy-for-the-moment." Several times in the canon Marvel Universe, Mjolnir has been lifted by ...


38

In the comic Thor #377 (March 1987, written by Walt Simonson), Thor uses Mjolnir to smith a new suit of protective armor.


36

It's likely named after Thor's hammer from Norse mythology. Nothing I can find implies it has any relation to the Marvel weapon specifically. Halo has a history of similarly-named armor components. For example: "YGGDRASIL", originally the world tree in Norse Mythology. "GUNGNIR", originally the spear of Odin. "Valkyrie", originally the female warriors of ...


34

Last year during Sand Diego Comic Con Joss Whedon did a 45 minute Q and A. In regards to the "Excalibur" scene, a fan asked: “How is Steve Rogers not worthy?” To which Whedon replied with: “Is he not? Are we sure?” Whedon responded, a hint of teasing in his voice. “Did he fail? Or did he stop?” While this isn't a definitive answer to your question,...


31

Odin fully believed Thor was worthy to take his place on the throne as King. It was only once Odin deemed Thor unworthy of being King that he lost the ability to wield Mjolnir. Previously, both myself and KutuluMike argued that Thor's hammer hadn't been enchanted at the beginning of Thor. However, Valorum found this quote from Odin before Thor loses his ...


31

According to Thor Vol. 1 #138, the answer is that as a cane, there is no immovability enchantment on it:


30

Spoilers all for Avengers: Endgame To update as of Avengers: Endgame Captain America is indeed worthy and uses Mjolnir in the battle against Thanos. Thor even says himself, "I knew it." Which implies that during the scene in Age of Ultron that Steve was worthy at that time but chose not to. This was confirmed by Anthony Russo in a Reddit AMA ...


30

Technically anyone pre-Thor, so pre-2011, would have been able to wield Mjolnir as the worthiness enchantment was only placed on it then. However, as we only get a very brief glimpse of this time period we don't actually see anyone else wield Mjolnir. Odin: Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor. Thor, Mjolnir's ...


30

According to the Guidebook to the Marvel Cinematic Universe - Marvel's Thor, Odin tossed Mjolnir to Earth after Thor, so that it'd be available to him when he'd learned humility. Declaring Thor unworthy of Asgard and his title, power, and family, Odin stripped Thor of his armor and his hammer Mjolnir, and exiled Thor to Earth. Enchanting Mjolnir to be ...


25

No. Canon Earth-616's Mjolnir cannot be moved by brute strength as long as Odin's "worthiness" enchantment functions. It has never been lifted by anyone sentient who was not worthy. It has resisted most versions of the Hulk (exception below), Hyperion, even DC Comics physically strongest hero, Superman (during designated crossovers). In the Marvel ...


24

The Mjölnir is made out of an Asgardian metal named 'uru'


24

And assuming you're referring to the nordic Thor instead of the Marvel Thor: Mjölnir could either be a stone hammer (Based on the name), or made from iron when Sindri and Brokkr had a bet with Loki that they could create items more beautiful than those of the Sons of Ivaldi. The last item they created - Sindri puts iron into the forge, and whilst Brokkr is ...


24

The enchantment placed on Mjolnir by Odin is as follows: Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor. Thor Quicksilver tries to wield Mjolnir and seeing as he isn't worthy, at least at this moment in time (he probably is later when he sacrifices himself), it starts to fall to the floor and due to how fast both are ...


21

It was used to rebuild Asgard. In a comic from 2004, Asgard was destroyed. Then in a truly wonderful sequence from a comic in 2007, Thor rebuilt the city of Asgard in Oklahoma by waving Mjolnir around, striking a series of dramatic poses and shouting "Asgaaaaaard!"


20

Thor is a celebrity on Earth. Thor (while having a conversation with Loki) is approached by people asking to take pictures with him. Thor disguises Mjolnir as an umbrella because he is trying to stay low key and trying not to be identified as he is looking for Odin. Anyway the reason he disguises Mjolnir is the same reason a celebrity might wear glasses ...


19

Thor's hammer, Mjolnir is made of the fictional metal Uru. Uru's main property is that it is a metal that holds magical enchantments well. The ore is unique to the realm of Asgard.


19

You are starting from an assumption which has no basis anywhere in canon. What has some basis in canon is a line said by Doctor Strange in Avengers: Infinity War: Doctor Stephen Strange: It's a simple spell but quite unbreakable. Ebony Maw: Then I'll take it off your corpse. Doctor Stephen Strange: You'll find... removing a dead man's spell... troublesome. ...


18

You're misreading the passage. The blacksmith Eitri and his assistants Brok and Buri used the core of a dying star as the heat source to "forge a mold with which he birthed Mjolnir". This "heart" (which presumably also served to heat the Uru from which the hammer is constructed) was not inside the star at the time but rather had already been ejected from ...


18

The Russo brothers recently revealed that they interpreted the scene in that he could always lift it but just chose not to as we see in this answer by @galacticninja. GeneralBenKenobi: Could Cap always wield Mjolnir (meaning he could have picked it up in Age of Ultron and decided not to), or did he progressively get more worthy over time? Russo_Brothers: ...


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