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100

The film is based on stories from myths of various Oceanic cultures, although they take typical Disney liberties to make their own story. Maui is a popular character in Polynesian mythology, and most of his character is based on the real myths. The faithfulness of other parts of the movie to the traditional stories varies. Maui, described in Moana as a ...


75

Some of them have backings, but others don't. Most of the characters are based on characters from Polynesian myths, but the details in some cases do not line up with the mythology. Let's take a look... Māui Note: There are a lot of versions of Māui, from different islands. I'm going to lump them all together - I can't separate them, as not all sources ...


47

For the record, Maui is perfectly capable of swimming in human form (and seems both reasonably buoyant and pretty confident of his chances of swimming at least a mile) but it seems unlikely that even a demi-god could swim the hundreds of miles required to get to the next nearest island. He may simply have been using hyperbole. With his vast muscle-mass, he ...


31

It is based on Polynesian Mythology Disney explicitly researched Polynesian Mythology and intended to make the movie based around that. The most obvious example in the movie is that of Maui who was named after the demigod Māui (obviously), the great cultural hero and trickster in Polynesian mythology. There is also Te Fiti who is a made up character ...


11

The "making of" artbook is quite instructional. Maui isn't just marooned on his island, he's been positively imprisoned there by the ocean, presumably until he's learned.his.lesson (or at least until the ocean finds a suitably photogenic girl to teach him that lesson). Note the use of language; Maui is trapped. His island is like Alcatraz, etc. Maui’s ...


9

This monster was revealed to be called the Sloth Monster. Presumably this is because it's actually based on the model used for Flash from the film Zootopia (but wearing a traditional Polynesian mask). This particular monster doesn't appear in Polynesian myth (unlike the eight-eyed bat) and was a creation of the artists, along with many of the other monsters ...


7

According to the film's junior novelisation, the spiral was covered under layers of cooled lava. It wasn't until the climactic fight (which resulted in multiple layers being smashed off, at the cost of Maui's hook) that the spiral was finally revealed. No longer sure what to do, Moana took a deep breath to calm herself and listened for her voice inside. ...


3

Maui discusses the apparent lack of helpfulness of the ocean in a scene that was deleted from the final cut of the film. In short he accuses it of being crazy and capricious; helpful one moment and downright unhelpful the next. Note that the ocean seems to have intentionally kept Maui on his island for a thousand years, so he's probably a bit grumpy with it ...


2

The Ocean's role in Moana is an interesting one. Put simply, the Ocean does not help Moana in any way until she has attempted to sort out the problem first herself and failed. Maui even says: The ocean doesn't help you. You help yourself. A good example of this is when Maui tricks Moana and traps her in the cave, sailing away, away (you're welcome) in ...


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