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123

In Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows, Chapter 15, The Goblin's Revenge, when Ted Tonks asks Griphook why was he on the run, Griphook answers: "What about you, Griphook?" "Similar reasons," said the higher-voiced goblin. "Gringotts is no longer under sole control of my race. I recognize no master." According to this paragraph I assume that the Goblins of ...


83

This looks like it might be The Price of Life, a 1987 short film produced by Chanticleer Films and originally aired on the U.S. cable channel, Showtime. While it doesn’t have a Wikipedia entry of its own, but a brief description is found in the “Similar Works” section of the article for the 2011 film In Time. The emphasis below is mine. The Price of Life ...


61

The Focus on Highborns/Higher Social class A Lord or an anointed knight would find looting corpses below them. They normally own a fortune so they do not need to sell swords from corpses. Common soldiers do loot corpses or whatever they fancy in posessions of their victims. GoT focuses on Knights, Lords, Kings, Theocrats etc. None of them are exactly the ...


60

"Star Trek's replicator technology nullifies....scarcity" Not so. This conversation is a rite of passage for any Econ major. While many things would cease to be scarce, when you get down to brass tacks, a replicator is not nearly as disruptive as you might think. First of all, the replicator needs power to operate, so everything associated with traditional ...


50

According to several sources, including the TNG novel "Balance of Power", latinum is described as being so dense and complex that the replicators are unable to restructure matter into a form that duplicates it. In its natural state, latinum is a liquid which is mined from certain types of nebulae. It is pressed into gold in order to make it more usable as ...


45

This is all purest speculation, but I am assuming that Gringott's doesn't impound an account just because the Ministry wants them to: Ministry Official: We'd like you to impound the account of a convicted criminal. Gringott's Representative: We are glad to cooperate with any lawful instructions of the Ministry. What is the criminal's name? MO: Sirius ...


38

Bankers do make an appearance in the book. The main bank in ASoIaF is the Iron Bank of Braavos All of the free cities have their own banks, but the Iron Bank is by far the most powerful. It is considered highly foolish to trifle with the Iron Bank, where it is often said, "The Iron Bank will have its due." If necessary, the Iron Bank will use its vast wealth ...


32

Slytherincess has given an excellent answer if we could figure out how much Harry has. Let me give you a few clues as to how much that might be, and then let's estimate. Here's what we know. Harry had a visibly large amount of money, but not so much that he could afford to spend in on whatever he wanted. In particular, the Firebolt seemed out of his reach, ...


31

The exact amount is never stated in canon, and it's impossible to estimate without knowing exactly how many Galleons, Sickles, and Knuts Harry owned. But it was a considerable amount: Griphook unlocked the door. A lot of green smoke came billowing out, and as it cleared, Harry gasped. Inside were mounds of gold coins. Columns of silver. Heaps of little ...


31

In the film Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix we see an advert at the bottom of the Daily Prophet for a loan service offered by GalloLoan$. Note that they offer loans to people who've been refused them elsewhere, indicating that they're not the only game in town. "Need a CREDIT for a NEW BROOM? Living on an overpotion? Pressure from debt ...


29

In real-world terms, the Galactic Credit seems to be roughly analogous to a US dollar although certain items are going to be massively cheaper as a result of droid labour or massively more expensive depending on the relative purchasing power of your credit, your distance from the Empire/Republic and the rarity of the item you're purchasing. It's also worth ...


27

Who produces the currency of the 7 kingdoms? It's definitely not the master of coins, considering what I saw. Actually yes, it is the master of coins. But those coins are commodity money - the crown first has to buy the gold or silver they are made from, they cannot be produced in arbitrary numbers. Is the currency centralized at all in 7 Kingdoms, or ...


25

Again, not quite canon, but the books make it clear that it's very difficult to fool a goblin. (Well, Hermione impersonating Bellatrix aside...?) So I suggest that the Bank goblins would establish the authenticity of any money order they received, and that it might be as simple to them as the stroke of a finger. I also agree that the books indicate that ...


25

We don't know, but there's no reason to think not. There's not much canon information on the precise administrative workings of Gringotts bank. You can find a detailed analysis in this excellent answer, as well as a small amount of canon information from the old Pottermore in this answer to the same question. But we do know that goblins are willing to lend ...


22

They visited Charlie for Christmas in the year before that (Harry's first year): It was true that Harry wasn't going back to Privet Drive for Christmas. Professor McGonagall had come around the week before, making a list of students who would be staying for the holidays, and Harry had signed up at once. He didn't feel sorry for himself at all; ...


21

It's not a story, but a short essay by Larry Niven, Yet Another Modest Proposal: The Roentgen Standard (the link is to Niven's own web site).


21

The Wizarding coinage system is almost certainly based off (or possibly spoofing) pre-decimalization British coinage. More specifically, the exact numbers of Galleon/Sickle/Knuts is probably to do with the weirdness relating to the gold Guinea coin in the late 17th century, where the fluctuating value of gold relative to silver resulted in the "1 pound ...


20

It certainly goes back further than 1942. In my opinion, it most likely originated with John W. Campbell in the early 1930s. I will present the evidence. In the online OED, the science-fictional "credit" is sense 14a of the noun: a. In various informal or fictional contexts: a unit of currency. Later also: a unit used as a measure of a person's ...


20

Seems like they would. There are a couple of examples that leap out at me of wizards using Muggle money. First, there's Mr Weasley at the Quidditch World Cup. 'You'll be paying now, then?' said Mr Roberts. 'Ah - right - certainly -' said Mr Weasley. He retreated a short distance from the cottage and beckoned Harry towards him. 'Help me, Harry,' he ...


20

This does happen, albeit in the books more than the TV series. In Season 6, Episode 7 it is stated that the visitors to the camp are looking for Money, Food or Steel as payment for protection. Also remember that (most) of the characters that we follow are: a) rich b) honorable


19

House Baratheon has strong historic ties to the Targaryen Dynasty. Orys Baratheon, the house founder was a general in the army of King Aegon I Targaryen, the Conqueror and is rumoured to be his bastard brother. During the Conquest, Orys defeated the Last Stormking and for his contributions to Aegon's Conquest, Orys was made the first Hand of the King and ...


19

Let's rephrase the question: "Why does no one take the murdered victim's sword to sell it?" CSI doesn't really exist in the Game of Thrones world, so if there are no witnesses to your fight with an enemy, you normally can get away with it. However, carrying the victim's belongings, especially something as valuable as a sword, will implicate you in the ...


18

I think it's for humour, and to exaggerate the "old timey / old fashioned" nature of the magical world. After all, in England, old or old-fashioned people think it makes sense to divide things into 12s or 20s, and not to use the same multiplier for all of them. Old books use even more complicated things like guineas that are strange combinations of other ...


18

According to the GoT Wikia and the AWOIAF Wikia, the primary currency of the Western Kingdoms is the Gold Dragon, a physical currency based on the Gold Standard. The relative values are discussed extensively in the books as well as the canon(ish) roleplaying game; Golden Dragon - equal to 210 Silver Stags, or 11,760 copper pennies (56 X 210 = 11,760). ...


18

Based on the fact that Molly Weasley needs to collect her pittance from the family's bank vault (when it could be easily, and more conveniently have been stored in a small snoke-skin purse at the family's home), it seems most likely that salaries are transferred directly from a central MoM account to the account/vault of the MoM employee. The vaults were ...


17

There's an implication -- or perhaps an easily-made inference, since it may have been unintended -- that while the "official" Federation economy is not just cashless but truly non-monetary, there is a less official, grey-market economy that is not only monetary, but has fallen back on "hard" currency that cannot be replicated, like gold-pressed latinum. This ...


16

Master of coins acquire gold and silver to keep the ship afloat. As Littlefinger explains it in season one when Eddard is informed that they are six million gold dragons in debt: "The master of coin finds the money, the king, hence the hand, spend it." He is responsible to fill the treasury, keep books and advice in financial matters. Bank systems, up until ...


16

It wasn't a "short, black & White" movie, but this is very much like the premise of In Time, which starred Justin Timberlake. Humans had been genetically engineered -- they no longer aged (protagonist's mother looked 25, so did the protagonist), but had a display on their arm of the remaining time in their life. Time was literally money -- you got paid ...


15

In addition to the root beer crate transaction of 10 strips. Memory Alpha also offers this comparative chart The following provides comparison on the value of latinum for specific items. Further details of each item may be seen above. Clothing Cadet's uniform - five strips Dress from Garak's Clothiers - seventeen to twenty strips Life savings ...


15

We know from A Feast of Crows that newly minted silver coins ("Stags") do have Robert's face on the reverse. "King Robert." She put a silver stag on the barrel between them. Robert's head was on one side, the stag on the other. It seems likely that newly minted gold Dragons would also have Robert's face on them. As to the question of replacing the ...


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