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45

TL; DR It was a full moon IRL, but not in the Potterverse. The Hogwarts Express leaves London on the 1st of September every year. In 1993 -Harry's third year at Hogwarts- it was a full moon IRL, as you can see in this calendar. Since the train arrives after dusk, Professor Lupin should have turned into a wolf in front of the kids. So the moon was in a ...


25

Ideas Die Hard by Isaac Asimov. But Oldbury still looked at the Moon. It was terribly close and now the surface was moving quickly. They were starting the swing in earnest and Oldbury’s scream was high-pitched. “Look! Lookathat!” His pointing finger was stiff with terror. ... “You saw it. You saw the hidden side of the Moon as we went past and ...


22

I believe it is The Vacuum-Packed Picnic by Rick Gauger It features a picnic on the lunar surface, which leads to the original poster's tryst: “A picnic. How would you like to go on a picnic? With me,” I said, blurting out the first idiocy that came into my mind. “If you like, I’ll take you to one of my favorite spots. It’s not far, just a short walk ...


22

Could it be the Empire from the Ashes series? From TVTropes (obligatory warning): Lieutenant Commander Colin MacIntyre is on a mission to map the dark side of the Moon. Imagine his surprise when it kidnaps him instead! Dahak has been waiting abandoned in orbit, camouflaged and disguised as the Moon. Its AI has been awake and idle the whole time, ...


22

This is not Heinlein. It is Clarke. This is Arthur C. Clarke's "Watch This Space", first published on 1956-05-28 as part of the series Venture to the Moon in the Evening Standard. Venture to the Moon was collected into The Other Side of the Sky in 1958. Reaching up to the letter C on my bookshelf … Captain Vandenburg was the one who suffered most....


21

I read a sci fi short story sometime between 1974-1980 but it may have been written long before that. I believe it was in a paper back anthology of sci fi stories, but I'm not certain. "Wrong-Way Street", a short story by Larry Niven, first published in Galaxy Magazine, April 1965, which is available at the Internet Archive (click here for download options)....


14

That sounds like part of "The Man Who Sold The Moon" - a novella by Robert A. Heinlein This is all from memory, it's been a long time since I read the story: There's a scene where D.D. Harriman (the title character) is looking into possible sponsorships for the first moon flight, and he visits the head of "Moka-Cola" while wearing a button for the cola's ...


13

"I Made You" This is a short story by Walter M. Miller Jr. It has been published multiple times. The only survivor of the tank’s assault is a man in a cave: The land was silent, airless. Nothing moved, except the feeble thing that scratched in the cave. It was good that nothing moved. It hated sound and motion. It was in its nature to hate them. ...


13

I'm pretty sure this is Robert Heinlein's The Menace From Earth. Interesting though how people remember different details - the story's main plot revolves around the flying and the heroine's dislike for a visitor from Earth whom she sees as a romantic rival for her friend (not, at that point, boyfried). The trip to Earth is only mentioned in one paragraph, ...


13

"Battlefield", short story by Harlan Ellison; first published as "His First Day at War" in Space Travel, November 1958, available at the Internet Archive; previously identified as the answer to the question Scifi short story where 'blues is good reds is bad'. The dinner party is just a small part of the story, which begins on the moon. Here is some dinner ...


12

I think this must be "Sunday Night Yams at Minnie and Earl's" by Adam-Troy Castro (a review). This review provides more details: Destination turns out to be something that cannot exist! A very small-town American house on the lunar surface, not covered by any kind of dome or artificial structure, & inhabited by old couple Minne & Earl, & ...


9

Sounds like it could be With Friends Like These by Alan Dean Foster. The full text is on this Reddit webpage. On the shield: "Then a great scientist of one of the allied races of the Veen discovered, quite by accident, the quasi-mathematical principle behind the Shield. The nature of the Shield forbade its use on anything smaller than a good-sized ...


9

Possibly the 1951 Arthur C. Clarke short story If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth? This involves the last humans living in a self-sustaining moon colony after a nuclear war leaves Earth uninhabitable. If you are seeking something longer, perhaps the 1969 novel by D S Halacy "Return From Luna" An eighteen-year-old boy looks forward to spending time on the ...


9

Could this be Steel Beach by John Varley? The "steel beach" in question is Luna, Earth's moon and the most heavily inhabited world in the solar system since the Invaders obliterated human civilization on Earth; the title alludes to humans being figuratively thrown onto the inhospitable moon, paralleling fish that made their way onto land in the ...


8

This is Rudy Rucker's Ware Tetralogy. The bit about the ice-cream truck is from the first book, Software, and the moon bit is from the second, Wetware. You can download a free eBook of the series from the author's site.


8

Matthew Looney series by Jerome Beatty jr. Essentially as you described. The Matthew Looney books chronicle the adventures of a brother and sister, Matthew and Maria Looney, who live in the town of Crater Plato, on the Moon. In Beatty's stories, the inhabitants of the Moon are a fully developed non-human civilization. Beatty's fictional Moon ...


8

This is the Chris Godfrey of U.N.E.X.A. series by Hugh Walters. The mould actually shows up in Expedition Venus; A space probe returns to Earth from Venus, and lets loose a mould which quickly spreads. Chris and his friends have to journey to Venus to find an antidote. "Chris Godfrey of U.N.E.X.A." Blast Off at Woomera (1957) aka Blast Off at 0300 The ...


8

"The Man Who Sold the Moon" by Robert A. Heinlein, published in the anthology of the same name, and part of the "future history" series. Delos D. Harriman plays several potential patrons off of each other to fund a trip to the moon, one of which is the "Moka Cola" company. He gets funding from them by suggesting that if they don't, their rival "6+" will pay ...


7

Could it be part of "The Last Survivors" trilogy by Susan Beth Pfeffer? The first book, Life as we knew it was published in 2006. The description provided on Good Reads is: Miranda’s disbelief turns to fear in a split second when a meteor knocks the moon closer to the earth. How should her family prepare for the future when worldwide tsunamis wipe ...


7

Can anyone identify this story and author for me? "The Wings of Night" by Lester del Rey, originally published in Astounding Science-Fiction, March 1942, available at the Internet Archive. Any of these covers look familiar? An alien on the moon, the last of his race, Once, as the whole space about him testified, his had been a mighty race. But time had ...


7

The Moon is Hell!, a 1951 novel by John W. Campbell, Jr.. Does any of these covers look familiar? The story has its own Wikipedia page. Here is a review from the August 1951 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction: John W. Campbell Jr.'s THE MOON IS HELL! (Fantasy Press) is an extraordinary short novel: the diary of a stranded lunar ...


7

This sounds like "The Strawberry Window" by Ray Bradbury. As K-H-W commented, there are a couple of slight discrepancies: the family is living on Mars, not the moon, and the money is their life's savings instead of being specifically intended for a return trip. The wife is unhappy living on Mars and misses their home back on Earth: "Bob..." Her voice was ...


7

"Moontrack", a novelette by George W. Olney in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, March 1978, illustrated on the cover: Minutes of JCS Meeting Ref. OP BEM II Note: Speaker key furnished under separate cover. TOP SECRET Excerpt #4 Speaker A: Do you seriously mean to stand there and tell me that you propose the use of a mechanized force on the Moon? ...


7

"The Hole in the Hole" by Terry Bison (ISFDB). Summary from here: "Sci-Fi author Terry Bisson wrote a humorous short story called "The Hole in the Hole" in which the main character discovers a portal that opens onto the surface of the moon in a junkyard. He and a companion attempt to retrieve the lunar rover so they can sell it for a bundle." (...


6

The colors identifying power levels sounds like the young adult series "The Seventh Tower" by Garth Nix. The magic-users of the world live in a huge castle separated from the rest of the world, and their rank and power are signified by color, with red being the lowest and violet being the highest. I read it a long time ago, so I don't remember if the ...


6

I am watching this movie right now. The movie is Hyper Sapien: People from Another Star There is a three-eyed furry orange alien named Kirby, that is meant to be cute but is somewhat terrifying. It has three arms which double as legs. The film moves slowly as the two girls try to fit in but are thwarted by Kirby causing problems. The girls can read minds ...


5

You have described The Legion of Space, a novel (short by today's standards) by Jack Williamson. It was originally published as a six-part serial in the April, May, June, July, August, and September, 1934 issues of of Astounding Stories, which are available at the Internet Archive ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]). It has been asked about before, e.g. here. ...


5

Virtually the same question was posted in the BookSleuth Forum at AbeBooks.com, except that the somewhat misleading "lunar" was replaced by "on a moon": I remember it took place on a moon. There was something siren like luring people out of the station and onto the surface. I remember the ending - the narrator was back on earth but at night would still ...


5

This sounds a bit like Ubik (Philip K Dick). wikipedia article The young female has the ability to undo events by changing the past. A group of "anti-psis" go to the moon. Not an exact match but some similarities.


4

According to USENET: Ceres Solution, by Bob Shaw From a review at https://sfbook.com/the-ceres-solution.htm : If you are an old hand a science fiction, there's a good chance that you've heard the theory or read a story that put forward the theory, that our large moon is the reason for development of intelligent life on Earth. If you've read any number of ...


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