73

War crimes are generally defined as actions taken during war time that violate agreements regarding what is and is not acceptable in war. Therefore, it's impossible to say how Luke's actions would be viewed without knowing what conventions of warfare (if any) are agreed upon in the Star Wars universe. However it seems highly unlikely that Luke's actions were ...


45

The key concept that you are missing is proportionality. To quote Luis Moreno-Ocampo, Chief Prosecutor of the ICC, in 2006: Under international humanitarian law and the Rome Statute, the death of civilians during an armed conflict, no matter how grave and regrettable, does not in itself constitute a war crime. International humanitarian law and the Rome ...


26

We know that at the end of the day, Snape was never a "good guy": Snape is all grey. You can't make him a saint: he was vindictive & bullying. You can't make him a devil: he died to save the wizarding world Snape was a bully who loved the goodness he sensed in Lily without being able to emulate her. That was his tragedy. Snape didn't die ...


25

There's a story very like this -- Connie Willis's "Ado." It's not students but a teacher who picks Hamlet to teach because it has the fewest issues, and by the time they are done censoring out everything that's objected to, they are left with a few sentences.


23

Disney Canon There don't seem to have been any major issues expressed by the Jedi regarding the clones. Obi-Wan's attitude seems to reflect pretty much all of the subtext that we see later in in the Clone Wars TV show, that although cloning is abhorrent, the alternative (domination by the Separatists) is worse. The callousness of it all stuck Obi-Wan ...


22

In my experience, the answer to this question is NO. However, it is a difficult question to answer because Captain America started off a symbol of patriotic fervor and under the wrong circumstances could have lead to his being used as a form of jingoism. (See: U.S. Agent/Super-Patriot) Steve Rogers as Captain America's goal was to be a symbol of a nation at ...


15

The actor portraying Tuvix; Tom Wright stated that he felt that Janeway was right to separate him/them back into their original selves: "There isn't any moralizing," he observed. "It's just a story about a character, and you follow that character during the time he is alive. You watch the birth and the life and the death of one character in one ...


15

It's unclear if "deintegrating" Tuvix into Tuvok and Neelix is a violation of Tuvix's rights (indeed, if he has any) under the Constitution of the United Federation of Planets or the Charter of the United Federation of Planets, as neither document was completely enumerated in any of the Star Trek TV series or films. Yes, Tuvix is a sentient being. If you ...


14

Voyager escaped the void with two other ships that apparently were native to the Delta quadrant. Janeway could in good conscience leave the job of spreading the word to the crews of those vessels. Warning buoys only work if they are understood as warnings, otherwise the buoys might attract the curious who could then stumble into the void. There are ways ...


13

I can't speak much for the comics, having only read a couple of Batman stories (Killing Joke and Knightfall), but as you have mentioned in your question, we have at least one definite example of Batman torturing someone - The Joker in The Dark Knight. In the scene you are referring to, The Joker is a prisoner and Batman is attempting to get information from ...


12

Three Worlds Collide by Eliezer Yudkowsky. Interestingly, it was written primarily to illustrate points/questions about the relativity of ethics, not to be entertaining (which it nonetheless is). I think the version I read had a preface explaining that it was based on some sort of challenge, to develop a realistic scenario how a society could develop that ...


12

Animagi are most commonly used by those involved in espionage and crime Animagi make up a small fraction of the wizarding population. Achieving perfect, spontaneous human to animal transformation requires much study and practice, and many witches and wizards consider that their time might be better employed in other ways. Certainly, the application of ...


12

It was to punish Oma Desala Firstly, Anubis did not self-ascend. He tricked Oma into helping him. After being expelled by Ra for actions deemed too extreme, even by Goa'uld standards, and repeated assassination attempts, Anubis found some research concerning ascension and decided to pursue it, faking his own death so the other System Lords wouldn't ...


12

I believe this is the novel The Tin Men (1965), by Michael Frayn. From the blurb: The William Morris Institute of Automation Research is working hard to simplify our lives by programming computers to carry out life’s routine tasks. Whether it’s resolving ethical dilemmas, writing pornographic novels, saying prayers, or watching sports, these automation ...


11

I had a similar reaction to this episode of despair for those trapped inside. However as far as Janeway's character and principles are concerned, she acted consistently. Consider the episode "Friendship One" when an entire race of people fell victim to technological interference from an old Earth probe. Feeling the disaster that befell their civilization ...


11

Even in the movies, the Jedi seem to be unhappy, or at least conflicted, about using the Clone Army. However, they have been wringing their hands and lamenting about their need for an army, so when one shows up unexpectedly, they realize that they have to use it regardless of any moral reservations they might have. OBI-WAN (V.O.) ...I've never heard of ...


10

The story you likely read is "Guest Law" by John C. Wright, in Year's Best SF 3. The story matches your synopsis in broad strokes, e.g. the proffer of urine to drink: "Hoy! Smith! Grease-monkey! Hand our guest his last draught of wine; your hands are the only ones fit to hand it to him!" And he took from his pouch a plastic bag from the ...


9

Yes droids do purposely inflict pain Droids are definitely aware of this fact, multiple times we see R2D2 use his taser for nefarious purposes. Not really a Force Awakens spoiler but I'll tag it anyway: Yes droids can feel remorse In Attack of the Clones 3PO has his head and body separated, his head ends up attached to a battle droid. During this ...


9

Most people don't think they want to live forever, and don't think that other people really want to live forever. In most literature (and stories, prior to writing) those who seek immortality find only tragedy. Most people would look at someone seeking the Stone and say, "They're greedy, and not good people." We don't know why or how Flamel created the ...


9

The Force didn't tell him to. Note that the Jedi are, by training, enforcers of the law rather than breakers of it. Although Qui-Gon doesn't worry too much about using his mind-tricks to get Watto to take currency that he'll have to change later (causing him a minor inconvenience) or influencing Watto's rigged chance-cube, he balks at outright beating the ...


8

I'm pretty sure you're looking for Ted Reynolds' Can These Bones Live?, first published in Analog magazine March 1979. It's supposed to be available from SmashWords October 2015 as part of this anthology. from Aliens and Alien Societies: A Writer's Guide to Creating Extraterrestrial Life, by Stanley Schmidt: Some human-alien interactions will be unique ...


8

"Closing the Timelid" is a short story by Orson Scott Card. It appears in his short story collections Unaccompanied Sonata and Other Stories and Maps in a Mirror.


7

After some searching around, there doesn't seem to be any new information on this subject from the creators of Once Upon A Time. It is possible that they simply wanted to avoid giving attention to the issue. It is true that, at one point, writer Adam Horowitz said it was not rape: she didn't use his heart for that. I know. Trust me. However, Horowitz has ...


7

A lot has been tossed about in this regard. Superman/Wonder Woman #3 kind of explored this in a modern context, where Diana Prince/Wonder Woman and Superman kinda have a thing going. And so, of course, who better to discuss this with than the socially well adjusted Batman Superman's morality, for the most part, comes from a strong upbringing by the Kents. ...


7

There's an episode in TNG (The Measure of a Man, 2x09) where it's debated if Data is a sentient lifeform with basic human (humanoid?) rights; or a machine that can be disassembled to see how "it" was created. They actually go on to have a hearing about it, with advocates arguing both points. Compared to that, it would seem that Tuvix's treatment is not up ...


6

Janeway herself would appear to class it as murder given her speech to the Vidiians in "Phage". She seems to have forgotten her high principles by the time Tuvix appears though. So now I am left with the same choice you made. Whether to commit murder to save a life, or to allow my own crewman to die while you breath air through his lungs. I can't ...


6

Superman's hypnotic abilities extended far beyond masking his identity. Rather than simply being an uncontrollable phenomenon, he generally did have control of his hypnotism abilities and most of the examples I've seen were explained as extensions of his superhuman willpower. I'm not aware of any ethical discussion surrounding his super hypnotism but ...


5

Found it! It was The Teacher by Colin Kapp and it was the cover story in the August 1969 issue of Analog. (I vaguely remembered the cover and looked at a collection of Analog covers and boomdiada, there it was.)


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