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39

Both names refer to the same person; Melkor is the first name he was known by, while Morgoth is a name given to him by his enemies. Melkor, the original name, is the one he had from the very beginning, when he was part of the music of Iluvatar. The name is Quenya in origin, and means "he who arises in might", as he was accounted the mightiest of the Ainur ...


26

This is discussed in the Silmarillion. In short, Melkor is his proper name (from the Quenya word meaning "One who arises in Might") but the Elves won't say it for, ahem, reasons. Of the Enemies Last of all is set the name of Melkor, He who arises in Might. But that name he has forfeited; and the Noldor, who among the Elves suffered most from his ...


23

No. It was simply impossible for Sauron. In the context of your question, Galadriel is implying that Sauron return to the "nothingness" that exists outside Eä (the Universe), which is where he, a follower of Morgoth and abhorrently evil in his own right, belongs. Among those of his servants that have names the greatest was that spirit whom the ...


16

Yes, definitely We're told that, during the Years of the Trees, Morgoth (before he earned that name) walked among the Elves and tried to sway them against the Valar: Now in his heart Melkor most hated the Eldar, both because they were fair and joyful and because in them he saw the reason for the arising of the Valar, and his own downfall. Therefore all the ...


16

I think you have put your finger on a paradox, but I think you underestimate Manwe, though you have good reason to, since Tolkien says in the Silmarillion: For Manwe was free from evil and could not comprehend it, and he knew that in the beginning, in the thought of Ilvatar, Melkor had been even as he; and he saw not to the depths of Melkor's heart, and ...


14

Tulkas did fight with Melkor alone in the War of Powers and was victorious. Sure, that was somewhat later, but still before Melkor's captivity. I think that voids arguments along the lines that Tulkas was merely "the straw that broke the camel's back". Frankly, I disagree with the above reply. I think all the mentioning of Melkor being the mightiest Vala at ...


14

TL;DR I would argue that while Melkor is indeed more powerful than Tulkas, we are speaking of both (overall) power vs. individual strength and focus. Melkor could contest all other Valar because his only purpose was defeating them in order to become the king of Arda (while the Valar had trouble fulfilling the ideas given to them by Eru) and because of the ...


13

It was destroyed But not completely; the fortress itself was destroyed, so it was no longer a viable base of operations, but the tunnels and catacombs beneath were too extensive for the Valar to fully destroy or explore, and some of Melkor's minions hid there: Long and grievous was the siege of Utumno, and many battles were fought before its gates of which ...


12

It's not clear. There are certainly numerous descriptions of characters wearing armour, but there's far less info about what that actually consists of. For the record, I've been unable to find any use of "plate armour" in any of the novels or supporting materials. The best I've been able to find is a description of a Haradrim soldier wearing overlapping ...


12

Certainly my favorite scene in all Tolkien... it's my PC wallpaper... :-) To add to what Darth Satan said, Morgoth must be small enough so that Fingolfin could withstand him for a while, and small enough so that: "...Morgoth set his left foot upon his neck" (On the ruin of Beleriand and the fall of Fingolfin) If we consider that Fingolfin was probably ...


12

The corrupting power of the One Ring could not corrupt Morgoth further. All sources of evil, even of Sauron's evil, trace back to the revolt of Melkor. So the malignancy of the ring is ultimately due to Morgoth himself. Moreover, while Morgoth had lost a great deal of power by the time he was cast out, he was still a very powerful force. When he returns ...


11

Not known The prevailing theory is suicide by self-cannibalism; The Silmarillion tells us: Of the fate of Ungoliant no tale tells. Yet some have said that she ended long ago, when in her uttermost famine she devoured herself at last. The Silmarillion III Quenta Silmarillion Chapter 9: "Of the Flight of the Noldor Interestingly, at one point Tolkien ...


11

Melkor was grandiose. His helmet, as the Morgoth, was so heavy Beren could not lift it [Lays of Belereiand, 8.4136-4137], and he had a scar and limp [12.3604-09, 3615-3617, 3632-3634]. Melkor's physical form in the beginning is described as: because of his mood and the malice that burned in him that form was dark and terrible. And he descended upon Arda ...


11

Not anymore. I don't have a quote for Morgoth's original form, or any before his rebellion, but we know that by the time of the First Age he was limited to the form that we usually see portrayed in artwork. After he and Ungoliant destroy the Two Trees, Of the Darkening of Valinor says this: Now Melkor came to Avathar and sought her out; and he put on ...


10

He was not alone It is told among the wise that the First War began before Arda was full-shaped, and ere yet there was any thing that grew or walked upon earth; and for long Melkor had the upper hand. But in the midst of the war a spirit of great strength and hardihood came to the aid of the Valar, hearing in the far heaven that there was battle in the ...


9

According to the eponymous volume of History of Middle-Earth, all Middle-Earth is Morgoth's Ring. This is especially true of the element gold, from which the Ring was made, which (and the Mountain of Doom, which served as a direct channel to the fires of Udûn) contained a preponderance of the "Melkor ingredient", i.e. Morgoth's essence spread throughout ...


9

NO He neither had the power or will to do so. The Barrier to the Void was sealed by the Valar , and let's not forget that Sauron is a Maia ( junior to the Valar ). This suggests that he did not have the power. Perhaps it might have been possible with the One Ring, but I seriously doubt this ( as the Ring contains Sauron's Maia power, which is still ...


7

"whereas all the other Ainur who aren't Maiar are identified as Valar." - the Ainur are the "angelic" beings who existed with Iluvatar before the making of the World (Arda). The Valar are those of the Ainur (but not all of them) who descended to Arda and assumed physical raiment, to be Arda's guardians. Melkor was one of them, so techically, he's both an ...


7

The Secret Fire was never within Morgoth's reach The Flame Imperishable was, always and ever, solely of Eru Ilúvatar: To Melkor among the Ainur had been given the greatest gifts of power and knowledge, and he had a share in all the gifts of his brethren. He had gone often alone into the void places seeking the Imperishable Flame; for desire grew ...


7

Simply put, no. It's almost entirely made up In their album "War of Wrath", Blind Guardian decided to tell the story of The Silmarillion in a chronological order, with a narrator telling the story as it's told in the book. However, they opted to open the album with the end of the story and the War of Wrath. The most telling factor that it was made ...


6

Tolkien is never very specific about the details, but Morgoth created orcs by breeding captured elves and men, and thereby creating corrupted copies. Trolls presumably have some ent in their ancestry, and so on. How he got dragons one can only speculate.


5

Tulkas was victorious over Melkor at the Battle of Powers because at that point Melkor had already spent a sheer amount of himself in: Fighting all the other Valar by himself in the first war of Arda. Empowering hosts of Maiar that were attracted to his might from the very beginning; Valaraukar etc.. Corrupting other Maiar that were not attracted to him ...


5

As the other answers have already pointed out, both names refer to the same guy, and "Melkor" was dropped in favor of "Morgoth" because the former had positive connotations, while the latter is unmistakably negative in connotation. Incidentally, the same idea applies to Sauron: He was first called Mairon, which means "The Admirable", but after he fell ...


5

He is a former Vala. As you say, the Maia and the Valar are both just classifications of the Ainur. The full passage you quote is as follows: The Great among these spirits [the Ainur who came to Arda] the Elves name the Valar, the Powers of Arda, and Men have often called them gods. The Lords of the Valar are seven; and the Valier, the Queens of the Valar, ...


5

The main purpose of the curse was to make Húrin suffer, by forcing him to watch all the evils that befell his children. Everything else was just a useful side effect.


4

No, Sauron never attempted to betray Melkor, nor was he able to. When Thangorodrim was broken and Morgoth overthrown, Sauron put on his fair hue again and did obeisance to Eonwe the herald of Manwe, and abjured all his evil deeds. And some hold that this was not at first falsely done, but that Sauron in truth repented, if only out of fear, being ...


3

Yup, as far as the books go, Morgoth could never really create anything. He could only mock creatures created by Eru. Same as Sauron. He could only copy and corrupt others creatures. Some examples are orcs, which were once elves, but corrupted and twisted to dark purposes; wargs, which are probably evil-ler versions of normal wolves; and trolls, which were ...


3

Melkor knew that Men would eventually arise In those days, moreover, though the Valar knew indeed of the coming of Men that were to be, the Elves as yet naught of it; for Manwë had not revealed it to them. But Melkor spoke to them in secret of Mortal Men, seeing how the silence of the Valar might be twisted to evil. Little he knew yet concerning Men, for ...


3

The main difference between Melkor and Morgoth is that Melkor is a Quenya name with positive connotations ("he who arises in might") and Morgoth is a Sindarin name with negative connotations ("the black enemy"). In Tolkien's writings from c.1950, he had decided (as shown by other answers) that Fëanor was the one who coined the name ...


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