Hot answers tagged

93

We don't need to argue about reproductive fitness to explain this. Here in the real world, the fertility rate falls off as the standard of living increases. Until quite recently, the magical community has had a much higher standard of living than Muggles. (Arguably, they still do!) So we would expect their fertility rate, historically, to be similar to ...


80

Parents of Muggle-borns are allowed to retain their memories, and we see Hermione's parents in Diagon Alley. "So you don't think I'm a match for Lucius Malfoy?" said Mr. Weasley indignantly, but he was distracted almost at once by sight of Hermione's parents, who were standing nervously by the counter that ran along the great marble Hall, waiting for ...


68

It seems likely that wizards could handle total Muggle extinction. While the total extinction of Muggles may cause wizards some problems, it seems likely that they'll be able to handle any problems it poses. There would be enough wizards for a minimum viable population so it's likely they'll survive. The reason the Gaunts were so deformed due to ...


66

Parents can send letters by normal post. “You didn’t think it was such a freak’s school when you wrote to the head- master and begged him to take you.” Petunia turned scarlet. “Beg? I didn’t beg!” “I saw his reply. It was very kind.” “You shouldn’t have read—” whispered Petunia, “that was my private—how could you—?” Lily gave ...


53

As we learn from Chapter 1. The Other Minister in the Half Blood Prince, the muggle prime minister of the day is told of the ministry, and magic, with nothing to suggest they're oblivated when they leave office. In the sixth book they prove, that he was NOT obliviated: It was precisely this sort of behavior that made him dislike Fudge's visits so much. ...


48

Well, I do remember that in the Chamber of Secrets, Hermione's parents were in Diagon Alley with her. That clears the air around muggle-born students' parents being able to be in the magical world. And remember how in the same book, Maybe it has a special opening for muggle parents? There's probably some kind of way that muggle parents are granted a ...


43

Dumbledore believed Muggles deserved to be considered. When Dumbledore mentions the disappearance of Frank Bryce, a Muggle, he also says that he regrets that the Ministry doesn’t consider Frank’s disappearance important because he’s a Muggle. “And there was a third disappearance, one which the Ministry, I regret to say, does not consider of any ...


42

I would say yes. Three pieces of supporting evidence: Using Thestrals for transport is a serious breach of the Statute of Secrecy. From the first WOMBAT (transcript on HP Lexicon), if we assume that it isn’t a trick question, then we learn that Thestrals can’t be used for transport: Which of the following unorthodox means of transportation is ...


41

I don't think Hagrid is anti Muggle, he's only belligerent there because of the Dursleys (that is, their behaviour, not them being Muggles). Let's remember that: he just tracked them because they wouldn't let Harry read his letter he just learnt that Harry did not knew he was a wizard (or that wizard existed, as a matter of fact) and that he has always ...


39

There's really no explicit canon answer I'm aware of (in books/interviews), but all the clues point to the fact that this is at best, extremely rare, aside from the times when it's preferable to do so for practical necessities. One example when it was likely done would be Kingsley's muggle position as secretary to PM; it may have required some documents ...


39

It's very possible that a lot of "muggles" just didn't know they were wizards. The book that admits students to Hogwarts needs concrete evidence of a child using magic before it will write them down as being accepted to Hogwarts. That book was put there (and likely created by) the founders of Hogwarts. Since Hogwarts was founded just over 1000 years ago, ...


37

We know that Muggle mail can reach Hogwarts - Petunia once wrote a letter to Dumbledore, and he replied. We also know that the Dursley's were able to send Harry his Christmas presents; given their distaste for magic it is safe to assume that they would not have done so had it involved using an owl or any other magical means. Snape, when he was a child, ...


37

When the student receives their letter of admission into Hogwarts, we see the first time both the student and the family find out their child is magical. Colin drew a great shuddering breath of excitement and said, ‘It’s brilliant here, isn’t it? I never knew all the odd stuff I could do was magic till I got the letter from Hogwarts. My dad’s a ...


36

The reason why there seems to be a bias is simple: Harry didn't grow up with wizards, and Harry's experiences are the ones we know. Given that the Dursleys gave him an inordinate amount of stress, it's understandable that he would have a few outbreaks like this while in their care. Accidental magic certainly doesn't require muggles - Neville mentions his ...


36

Absolutely In 1932, a Welsh Green Dragon terrorized sunbathers on a beach near Ilfracombe. A wizard family on vacation modified the memories of the nearby Muggles, but it appears that some were not caught. From p. xxviii of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: In his 1972 book Muggles Who Notice, Blenheim Stalk asserts that some residents of ...


36

No, you've misunderstood the quote. JKR isn't saying that the result would be violent because violence is what lies inside a Muggle (though it does sound like something the Malfoys might come up with) but that the result of a Muggle using a wand would be uncontrolled because the Muggle lacks the ability to control magic - that's the power that lies inside a ...


34

Transforming oneself into a muggle (using Polyjuice Potion) doesn't remove magic. Harry pretends to be a red-haired Muggle boy at Fleur and Bill's wedding. Harry was rather uncomfortable. The Muggle boy whose appearance he was affecting was slightly fatter than him, and his dress robes felt hot and tight in the full glare of a summer’s day. Harry ...


33

Harry wears glasses. Many wizarding characters in the series wear glasses. It's a stretch to suggest there is a magical implementation of every single thing in the world. I see no reason why the wizarding world wouldn't partake of generic helpful items, Muggle or not, to care for their personal hygiene. A few examples from the movies: In the film Goblet of ...


32

First of all, I think we have to make a distinction here - some magical folk do understand Muggle tech and culture (extremely well!). Besides all the Muggleborns who do, basically by definition, we've numerous examples of the magical community interfacing with/controlling the Muggle populace. You can't tell the Muggle world Sirius Black is armed with a gun ...


32

Muggles and Squibs can be assumed to have souls. For evidence, let's consider Lupin's description of what happens to those who lose their souls to the Dementors: 'You can exist without your soul, you know, as long as your brain and heart are still working. But you'll have no sense of self any more, no memory, no ... anything. There's no chance at all of ...


31

When they receive their Hogwarts acceptance letter Hermione seemed surprised to get a letter from Hogwarts, which suggests that her parents probably were too: "Nobody in my family's magic at all, it was ever such a surprise when I got my letter, but I was ever so pleased, of course, I mean, it's the very best school of witchcraft there is, I've ...


30

Yes, a muggle can do something with a wand. According to the brand new "History of American Magic" writings on Pottermore, a muggle (from a family described as being descended from wizards, but possessing no magic) was able to use a wand in a semi-controlled fashion Bartholomew had disseminated his leaflets widely, and a few newspapers had taken him ...


30

Children of Pure-bloods and Half-bloods are Half-bloods JKR has stated on her old website that this was the case, however was quick to establish that this would only be of importance to those who feel the need to prejudice to that extent The expressions 'pure-blood', 'half-blood' and 'Muggle-born' have been coined by people to whom these distinctions ...


27

I'm not sure that's a direct quotation from Goblet of Fire, at least I can't find it in my copy (Scholastic). I did find this, though: “It’s bewitched,” said Hermione. “If a Muggle looks at it, all they see is a moldering old ruin with a sign over the entrance saying danger, do not enter, unsafe.” Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire – ...


27

No, Muggles can’t use wands. Muggles can’t use wands, whatever their moral alignment or personal feelings towards violence. As Dumbledore explains in his notes on “Babbitty Rabbitty and the Cackling Stump”, the violent reaction comes from within the wand itself, as wands can hold residual power that may be discharged from the wand. “While the “rogue” ...


26

Muggle parents aren't allowed to refuse Although JKR previously stated that attendance at Hogwarts isn't mandatory, the best example I can think is Harry Potter's (muggle) legal guardians refusing to send him to Hogwarts. They point-blank said he couldn't go, whereupon Dumbledore sent a gigantic and mentally unstable enforcer to intimidate the family into ...


26

No specific name is ever mentioned. There doesn’t seem to be any specific name that the pure-bloods use for the children of Mudbloods. When Yaxley, a Death Eater, refers to them, he calls them “brats of Mudbloods”. “Mother to Maisie, Ellie and Alfred Cattermole?’ Mrs Cattermole sobbed harder than ever. ‘They’re frightened, they think I might not ...


25

In the world of Harry Potter, magic manifests itself in physical beings. This is the subtle difference that Scamander is referring to. Wizards for example are susceptible to magical ailments such as Dragon Pox, which simply doesn't exist in any Muggle medical dictionary. Likewise Muggles are much more prone to injury or death from physical harm - even as ...


22

We're never explicitly told, but by mathematical necessity1, it must have been World War II. Frank Bryce's Age Goblet of Fire opens in July 1994, and we're told that Frank is closing on 77: Frank was nearing his seventy-seventh birthday now, very deaf, his bad leg stiffer than ever, but could be seen pottering around the flower beds in fine weather, ...


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