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47

Iron Man (in the MCU, at least) is just a genetically normal person with lots of money and technology. Sure, he had an arc reactor in his chest for a while, but he's no mutant. A mutant as seen in the X-Men would be born genetically different from a normal human. As noted in the above answer, Captain America was a normal person before being subjected to the ...


36

Within Marvel, the term of "mutants" specifically refers to recipients of the "X-gene", homo superior. It is a specific genetic mutation with a wide variety of effects, occasionally indicated to be the "next stage" of human development. As Phyneas indicated, it's not just the X-men — the Morlocks, the Brotherhood of Mutants, and other X-gene carriers are ...


33

They are, indeed, very similar. The main difference is very technical, based on the "origin" of their non-human genetics, and how those changes are activated. The X-Factor Mutants are humans that possess a genetic variation known as the X-Gene or X-Factor, which (at least in the main continuity) was introduced into the human population by the Celestials. ...


20

No. Using the basic premise that mutants were caused by the experimentation on the human genome by the god-like and mysterious beings known as the Celestials, first upon the Deviants, then the Eternals, and finally Humanity and the Inhumans, there has always been an implied arms races to create the most powerful reality-altering life-form possible for an ...


19

Long time Comic Aficionado, so I am going to take this one: So we can all be on solid ground, neither superhero group is by our current knowledge of genetics, physics, biochemistry, mathematics even remotely possibly able to perform any of the feats they have displayed over their 40+ years of comic history. Not even remotely. With that scientific ...


19

J. Jonah Jameson doesn't dislike Spiderman because he has powers. He dislike him because he wears a mask (among other reasons). J.J.J. was in fact very big on civil rights. "For decades Jameson used his newspaper to crusade in support of civil rights for minority groups" (from his Marvel Wiki page.) He also used his news paper to crusade against the KKK. ...


17

In the original Frank Herbert books, the Guild Navigators had been mutated over millennia by living and breathing in supersaturated spice gas, seemingly over many generations - in fact, it seemed they subsisted on nothing but the spice gas. The prequel/sequel series by Frank's son Brian (and Kevin J Anderson) introduced the idea that a human could become a ...


16

I will put forward the April 1938 "Hyperpilosity" by L. Sprague de Camp. In the Great Change of 1971, a virus infects humanity that causes everyone to grow fur all over their bodies. Initial reaction to the plague, dubbed "hyperpilosity" by the news media, is one of panic and horror. Various examples of the troubles resulting are told; the cast of the ...


15

This sounds like Expendable by James Alan Gardner. It's been a while since I've read it and I don't remember it that well, but it definitely: Features explorers who are societal misfits in some way, and so deemed expendable. Has a main character who is a woman with a large birthmark on her face. Is the first in a series. ETA: My girlfriend says that ...


15

This is the plot of A.E. Van Vogt's 1940 novel Slan. There are two types of "Slans": one type has golden antenna-like "tendrils" that they try to hide, but not always successfully, the way that you describe. Because of their psychic powers and their obvious difference, the main antagonist, world dictator Kier Grey, has the slans hunted to near extinction. ...


14

In the primary comics continuity (Earth-616), Scott Summers (aka: Cyclops) was the first recruited student which would become a member of the X-Men. Per Marvel's website: As a teenager, Scott came into the foster care of Jack Winters, a mutant criminal known as the Jack O'Diamonds. After Scott began to suffer from severe headaches he was sent to a ...


13

This sounds awfully like Cordwainer Smith's 1964 short story, "The Dead Lady of Clown Town". If this is correct, then the "mutants" of which you speak are actually underpeople, which were not humans originally but rather animals that had been experimented on, with the end goal of giving them an intelligence and ability similar to that of humans (but not the ...


12

In Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #91 we find the mutant Unus the Untouchable recuperating from a recent fight with the Hulk. It would appear that this encounter (and the exertion of his powers) has resulted in him gaining in strength. Unfortunately, a side-effect of this newfound power is that he now can't eat or drink, gravity is losing its ...


11

I don't recall that this has ever been specifically addressed, but I believe that this passage from Wikipedia is the most spot on. The character Wolverine is depicted as his long-time enemy, although conflicting accounts have been given as to the origin of their feud. It is also known that he and Sabretooth were victims of the Cold War supersoldier ...


11

It's the story "The Others" by J. Hunter Holly. The story is in the anthology The Other Side of Tomorrow by Roger Elwood. This seems a very obscure anthology. I thought I had a copy, but it seems to have been misplaced over the years. If it helps, there is a review in this blog that goes into some detail about the story. It's also on Google Books.


11

Much like Wolverine, they go into her forearm. You can see the x-ray in the movie. Much like Wolverine, they really don't make any sense as far as how they're controlled. When extended, there is a sort of segmented visual element to them. This is slightly at odds with the x-rays visible in the movie, as when retracted, they are housed in her arms in a ...


11

Indeed this is Heart of the Comet, a 1987 book by David Brin and Gregory Benford. I've read this book so many times and it never loses its appeal... A group of spacers and scientists land on Halleys Comet, and set about harvesting it for the materials and metals that comets are made of. They install mass launchers in order to change the orbit of the ...


10

The X-gene, the genetic propensity for Homo Superior to develop mutant abilities, does not have a mutagen (a catalyst for mutant abilities caused by mutation). The propensity for homo superior mutation is part of the DNA sequence of the 23 chromosomes of all Humanity living on Marvel Earth-616 and is activated by PUBERTY. This means the Celestials, the ...


10

There is one very central point where the X-men are more realistic, close to what you wrote: So, X-Men could be plausible (depending of the mutation of course), since we are all born with some mutated DNA. Correct. But, exposure to cosmic rays can't change your DNA like that, and even if it doesn't kill you instantly, the mutated DNA couldn't ...


9

The mutant problem became an issue in the early 1960s when Bolivar Trask, commissioned and created the first Sentinels to destroy the X-men. The Sentinels first appearance (along with Trask) was in The X-Men #14 (November 1965) Bolivar Trask was an anthropologist who saw the rise of mutants as a threat to humanity. Bolivar was the father of Larry Trask, ...


9

Franklin Benjamin Richards Franklin is a mutant beyond Omega-Level with vast reality-manipulating and psionic powers.1 1Powers and Abilities Two Celestials, Ashema the Listener and Nezarr the Calculator, were at one time tasked with retrieving Franklin for evaluation as a new member of the Celestial Host.2 2Heroes Reborn: The Return #1 He ...


9

This is based entirely on Frank Herbert’s Dune and sequels: Guild Navigators have been living in vats full of spice for years (possibly centuries). The spice in large quantities alters physical qualities and life span. This explains their ‘alien’ appearance. Although Fremen interact with the spice they simply do not interact with it in the same capacity. ...


8

Marvel has never been very tidy on explaining mutant genome issues, whether they be dominant or recessive, a series of gene traits, epigentics, or linked to a specific genetic series of alleles. If I were a betting man, I would go ahead and call them very recessive, with a hint of Celestial technology making them even less predictable than normally recessive ...


8

As far as we know, none. Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver are special cases: they are mutants, and always been associated with the X-Men, but they were also key figures in the Avengers since its founding. Marvel negotiated a shared licensing deal with Fox for those two: Marvel can use them in the MCU but cannot call them mutants. Quake, in the comics, was ...


8

In New X-Men #116, immediately following the Genosha attack, we actually see an answer to this: Genosha's population was about 16 million, and the news reports that it contained "over half" of the mutant population, which means, at most the accepted world estimate was 32 million. I've seen numerous reports that the actual world population, pre-Genosha-...


8

The Colour Out of Space is a 1927 story by H.P. Lovecraft where a meteorite crashes into a small town. The presence of the alien particles poison crops and cause animals and people to descend into madness. It isn't explicitly stated to be a virus infecting people, but a strange colour emanates from a well infecting people. Described as "that alien and ...


7

In the Ultimate X-men universe, there are a number of mutated animals who appear in the series. One of them, Prosimian is one of several super-evolved apes freed by the Brotherhood of Mutants from a lab. Prosimian is responsible for arranging the rescue and psychic deprogramming of Magneto during Ultimate X-Men 25.


7

The difference is an order of magnitude. The first was meant to develop a presumably powerful event of metahuman development through "natural selection." The second was an attempt to graft the metahuman potential of humanity back to the Kree species performing the experiments. The primary difference between mutants and Inhumans is causal. The ...


7

I'm going to assume you mean the oldest character in-universe. I believe this is Selene. To quote the Wikipedia: Selene was born over 17,000 years ago somewhere in what is now Central Europe, "after the Oceans swallowed Atlantis and before the rise of the Aryas". She is Conan the Barbarian era, so before recorded history. Of those you list, Namor was ...


7

Found it! Dominion (2007), by Keith Giffen. Well, what I thought were mutants were actually alien microbes. That happens. Back cover summary, which is more accurate than the ComicVine one: An alien virus is spreading uncontrollable superpowers through the city of Chicago. Handling intense situations is just part of the job for police officer Dick ...


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