Hot answers tagged

10

Each age is a separate and distinct universe. In The Book of Atrus Gehn shows Atrus how to make ages and how to travel from one to the other. It's possible to make an age that doesn't support life, which would mean that age is not in the same universe, with the same physical laws, as all the others. He is quite clear to Atrus that if you go into an age ...


9

Here's a quote from The Book of D'ni: Atrus looked up at the night sky, wondering, not for the first time, just when he was. From his studies of the star charts in the observatory, he had worked out that he was in a very different part of the galaxy from the planet he knew as Earth—or its equivalent—if one even existed in this Age. But it was more ...


9

Well as far as Atrus is concerned, while in the game you could only explore that one room, Atrus was actually only trapped on D'ni, (AKA Earth) furthermore, it wasn't that he was trapped on D'ni, but it was that he had no linking book to get back to Myst. It's likely that he could have gone to any other age he wanted. Even if he couldn't I'm sure he had ...


7

That telescope points into the Star Fissure, it's unclear what the star fissure is, other than: It's generally accepted that an age is a complete world or planet itself. The books mention that sometimes an age is destroyed when for example the world has fallen into a star (as mentioned in the Book of T'ana). There are counters to this rule however such as ...


7

Basically the power of "Writing" overrides pretty much anything we know about physics. Here's an excerpt from the Book of Atrus, from when Atrus first learned that Catherine (or anyone) was capable of writing ages. "The writing ... well, as I said, the writings wonderful. It's poetic. But in practical terms . .. it's riddled with contradictions, I'm ...


6

Yes, the golden dome is a steam engine. The device at the top generates fire marbles and the pipes send steam to work all the mechanical devices throughout the islands of Riven. I don't think anything in Myst is considered magic. I believe all of the water in Riven exhibits repulsion from heat. But this isn't some mysterious force, it's caused by ...


6

Using the example in either the book of Atrus (or perhaps Ti'ana, I can't remember at the moment), the Descriptive book makes the link to an Age in the Great Tree of Possibility (or was it time?). Once that link is made, you are on one branch of the Great tree, and subsequent alterations take you to branches on that branch. Because you're on the same ...


6

The "real" Myst Island is substantially larger than the island depicted in the game. Both Cyan and Myst (the game) exist in the Myst universe (in much the same way as Marvel exists in the Marvel universe). In-universe, Cyan simplified Myst Island to make the game both easier to develop and easier to play. According to Richard Watson, writing from an in-...


5

The fissure represents a break down in reality. Whatever the shape of the planet (if it even is a planet) the fissure is just a literal hole in space-time physics. The possibilities for shape of the planet and what else lies on the planet are limited only by what Gehn wrote into Riven. That's the way The Art works. Any conceivable (or inconceivable) ...


3

Very short version: Because quantum. Richard Watson, out-of-universe one of the Cyan developers and in-universe a member of the D'ni Restoration Council, has written about this. Note that the letter is written from an in-universe perspective: Many of the interpretations of quantum theory say that until a state of matter is observed, it exists in many ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible