63

In the appendix to the novel, it's made clear that people carry their gods with them and that when they alight in a new place, those gods are made anew in the image of the old god. There's an Odin in Norway and an Odin (Wednesday) in America at the same time but they're not the same being. The old man nodded slowly. He said, “My people went from here to ...


29

When the gods came to America, they did not leave their original lands. Depending how you look at it, the gods either sent a version of themselves abroad, or they left versions of themselves behind. Originally the two versions were (almost) the same, they may even have remained the same for a while, but over time they diverged. It was more than a hundred ...


24

I believe at the root of this is the notion of "that which you eat you will gain the strength/speed/inteligence/power of." Draining the power of Gods in WoW would be the equivalent of eating them in olden times. It is now easy to understand why a savage should desire to partake of the flesh of an animal or man whom he regards as divine. By eating ...


15

There is an elephant in the room which I am going to address. Yes, there is an example. Christianity. You may have heard of it. Christianity believes that through the death of their god, humanity would be saved. Some believe that emulating the pain and suffering of this death increases the state of Grace in the world and lubricates the way to heaven or the ...


15

The story of Kvasir comes to mind. In Norse mythology, Kvasir was a being born of the saliva of the Æsir and the Vanir, two groups of gods. Extremely wise, Kvasir traveled far and wide, teaching and spreading knowledge. This continued until the dwarfs Fjalar and Galar killed Kvasir and drained him of his blood. The two mixed his blood with honey, ...


11

In previous fantasy, there's lots of examples, for example from the D&D Forgotten Realms setting from 1990s. During The Time of Troubles, mortals kill gods, in some cases to steal their powers. Most notably the mortal Cyric who kills the god Bhaal and becomes a god himself. This story is central to the Baldur's Gate series of RPG computer games, ...


5

Yes, this individual (also known as Yi-Ya or 易牙) appears to have existed. The story is much as described. As a final example nearly 4000 years ago during the Shang Dynasty, the Chinese cook I-ya was reputed to have had such a sensitive palate that he could taste the difference between the waters of the Tzu and Sheng rivers. By way of bizarre self-abasement, ...


5

In mythology: Explicitly for power by humans, I can't find a direct example , although I have a feeling there must be some Maori, African or American Indian examples. I remember reading a huge 500+ page book in childhood which had collected stories about tricksters from all over the world. I kinda feel some examples lurk somewhere, will try to find more. ...


4

Yes, this exists in European folklore. Katherine Briggs documents many cases of people saying that there used to be fairies, but they died or went away, and that was the end of it. The folklorists who collected these tales noted that these stories were told side by side with tales of a continuing fairy presence. Then, folklore is seldom noted for its ...


3

From a Japanese friend who is an anthropologist specializing in music: This chant (both text and melody) is not a folk song, but written by Kawai. Its Japanese title "Utai" usually means a genre performed in Nō theatre, and out of the theatre often associated with wedding ceremonies. But this is never sung in the wedding as the text suggests a kind of ...


1

A partial answer might be "The Truth is a Black Cave in the Mountains" as it involves someone entering a set of caves in search of a treasure associated with Norse mythology. That said, I'm failing to find any reference to the caves leading to every place on Earth. Summary from this article in Exuent magazine: The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible