21

It's more than one story. The technology is slow glass. The author is Bob Shaw. And the first (short) story is Light of Other Days, published in 1966 and expanded to longer form as Other Days, Other Eyes in 1972. Later stories are Burden of Proof (1967) and A Dome of Many-Colored Glass (1972). Further reading Jo Walton (2010-10-07). Slow glass seen ...


15

Although it is a novel rather than a short story, this sounds very like (one of the) plots in "Singularity Sky",by Charles Stross, first published in 2003. The particular sub-plot deals with the "Festival" arriving at a planet called Rochard's World. It makes contact with the inhabitants by raining down cell-phones from orbit. Quoting the ...


13

Within the TV and Film Series, there's no further mention of Wesley's Nanites. The last we see of them, they've been abandoned on Kavis Alpha IV. In the wider trek canon (books, etc), we meet them again briefly in Immortal Coil where they're referenced as being part of a wider pan-civilisational grouping of robot and machine intelligences living in and ...


12

I wonder if this might be Divergence by Tony Ballantyne. It's not a perfect match but has a lot of similarities. You can see the covers here. One of the covers is pink, though it does not feature a cube. The book is set in a post singularity future and the Earth is ruled by an AI called the Watcher. The Watcher uses a drug called MTPH to make humans more ...


11

Could this be Steel Beach by John Varley? The "steel beach" in question is Luna, Earth's moon and the most heavily inhabited world in the solar system since the Invaders obliterated human civilization on Earth; the title alludes to humans being figuratively thrown onto the inhospitable moon, paralleling fish that made their way onto land in the ...


11

The earliest appearance of a superstrong filament that can cut through things seems to be Theodore Sturgeon's "molecularly condensed fibre" in "The Incubi of Parallel X," Planet Stories September 1951: Garth took pity on him — he was obviously about to burst with curiosity. He held up the thread. "Break off a piece for me, Bronze ...


9

Could this be "Limiting Factor" by Theodore R. Cogswell? "Oh, you wouldn't be doing that," said Mr. Thwiskumb mildly. "Those people down there aren't Ordinaries." "What!" "Dear me, no. They weren't the ones that were left behind. They are the descendants of those who migrated. Those poor devils down there are pure-blooded Superiors. When they ran into ...


9

You're referring to "The Nanotech Chronicles" by Michael Flynn, an anthology of his own nanotechnology-themed stories. The story with the graffiti artist is almost certainly "Soul of the City", described as; "a technological battle against outlaw graffiti artists leads to the sophistication of paintings that undergo calculated metamorphoses as their ...


8

Sounds like Forge of God (1987) by Greg Bear. (I've been meaning to find a copy to reread it. I particularly recall the appearance of a duplicate of Ayers Rock (Uluru).) One alien faction is determined to destroy civilizations, the other to preserve representatives. (A plotline that also shows up in the movie Independence Day: Resurgence.) The cataclysm at ...


8

Sounds like it could be The Gentle Seduction by Marc Stiegler. It has Nano-technology that heal people's ailments: She started to climb the Mountain, but it was too much for her: she huffed and puffed and had to go home. Annoyed, she went to the drug store and bought another capsule, one that restored her circulatory system and her lungs. One day as she ...


8

I think the novel you are looking for is Federation, by Judith & Garfield Reeves-Stevens, published in 1994. The villain in the novel is Adrik Thorsen, a military colonel who was a foe of warp drive inventor Zefram Cochrane in the 21st century. Later on, it is revealed that Thorsen used various alien technological means to extend his lifespan, and both ...


8

In real world biology, serum is the clear yellowish fluid left over from blood when you separate out the blood cells, normally by spinning in a centrifuge. It can still contain antibodies among other things, but no red cells. In recent decades the word has also been misappropriated by elements of the cosmetics industry for use in describing some of their ...


7

I do not have enough karma to comment, but could it be 'Holy Fire' by Bruce Sterling? As copied / pasted from the linked website: Mia Ziemann is a 94-year-old medical economist who enjoys all the benefits of her position. But a deathbed visit with a long-ago ex-lover and a chance meeting with a young bohemian dress-designer brings Mia to an awful ...


7

It is "Gravity Dreams" by L.E. Modesitt Jr. July 1999 ISBN 0-812-56661-0 LoC 99-22966 You can read it as an adventure tale, but the real subject is morality, ethics and a persons responsibility towards society and vice versa. (That is actually true for most of Modesitt's work.) From the back-cover: In Earth's distant future, Tyndel is both teacher and ...


7

"Quad World", by Robert Metzger....a good read! "but as you well know, time runs very short." He look a quick glance over his shoulder and looked up into the sky. I also looked: 23. It had dropped by another three kilometers per hour. I didn't know if Napoleon believed the Speed Limit story that Joan had told me, but he obviously thought those numbers ...


6

Your story seems to be part of the plot of David Edelman's Jump 225 trilogy (Infoquake, Multireal, Geosynchron). It's about a guy, with a smart and beautiful partner and another geek, who writes bio-software and fights hard with competition and with a somewhat tyrannic government. It all starts with augmented vision, but it develops into a kind of bio-...


6

This is the Earthfall Trilogy by Mark Walden, first book released in 2010. Earthfall (Earthfall #1) Sam awakens to see strange vessels gathered in the skies around London. As he stares up, people stream past, walking silently toward the enormous ships, which emit a persistent noise. Only Sam seems immune to the signal. Six months later, he is absolutely ...


6

I stumbled upon the answer while browsing Amazon. It's Dima Zales's The Last Humans series, which starts with Oasis. My name is Theo, and I'm a resident of Oasis, the last habitable area on Earth. It's meant to be a paradise, a place where we are all content. Vulgarity, violence, insanity, and other ills are but a distant memory, and even death no longer ...


6

As noted, The Man in the White Suit and "The Incubi of Parallel X" both effectively have monomolecular wire, but the first example of it being used to cut may be the "borazon-tungsten filament" in G. Randall Garrett's "Thin Edge." (Analog, Dec 1963) as per the Wikipedia entry. The cable they didn't have to worry about. Each ...


5

No, there is no concrete evidence that the Machines in the Matrix work anything like modern computers in the real world. However, if you want to ask questions about anything in the movie that isn't explicitly and completely described in the dialogue presented within the films (which is what all these other questions you reference are doing) AND you want to ...


5

The description is also pretty close to The Last Hawk by Catherine Asaro, published 1997. Kelric, the protagonist, is a golden-skinned (not just tan or yellowish; they have metallic tints in their skin in his race) Jagernaut, a warrior with nanotech biological enhancements. He's also a telepath. On the planet he crash-lands, there is a matriarchal society, ...


5

I think you are describing a book by Richard Phillips, "Second Ship", Book 1 of the Rho Agenda. While I can't find a really good descriptive narrative (I did find this synopsis) to corroborate all the elements, enough fit that I think it's a good match. Hidden ship - Check. Teenagers - Check. Found by three teenagers New powers - Check. Technology in the ...


4

Prior to First Contact and Scorpion, Assimilation seemed to be more of a surgical procedure during which the collective removed biological parts and added technology. In Best of Both Worlds, Picard was rendered unconscious on the Enterprise and taken to the Borg cube where he was assimilated. Beginning in First Contact, assimilation starts when the Borg ...


4

I recently read the SF novel "The Last Mortal Man" by Syne Mitchell. It's billed as the first installment of a series called "The Deathless." One of the major characters is Alexa DuBois, an African-American woman who works as an elite bodyguard for the billionaire (Lucius Sterling) who controls the process that replaces a normal human body with an "immortal"...


4

Blood Music, Greg Bear (ISBN 0-7434-4496-5) A biochemist working with biological computers attempts to save his work after being ordered to destroy it, by injecting it into himself. While living inside him, the cells evolve and create a nanoscale civilization, who then learn to communicate with their host. The original question might be updated to be ...


4

This page offers a candidate for first story to propose the idea of nanotech: "A Menace in Miniature" (1937) by Raymond Z. Gallun. According to the description, the characters in the story seem to be suffering from some sort of tiny projectiles that have gotten into their wounds, and one proposes to use a robot called a "scarab" which is about a quarter-inch-...


4

One Jump Ahead by Mark L. Van Name The main character was Jon Moore and his ship was a Predator Class Assault Vessel. Jon Moore: A nanotech-enhanced warrior who wants nothing more than a quiet life and a way back to his strange home world. Lobo: An AI-enhanced Predator-Class Assault Vehicle, a mobile fortress equipped for any environment from the seabed to ...


4

In addition to the other two answers, serum could also be a blind idiot or false friend translation. In German, serum has mutated in common use from the scientific definition via antiserum to become medication in a more general sense. Compare the use of truth serum in English.


3

James White's Final Diagnosis, one of the Sector General books, fits this pretty well. A man has a number of unusual illnesses and is being treated in the inter species hospital. Eventually it turns out that in an accident as a child he was "infected" with a nanotechnology Doctor by an alien, and it is still present in his system. Because it does not ...


3

The Last Mortal Man by Syne Mitchell (Deathless book 1) In the twenty-fourth century, nano-designed biology has turned the world into humanity's playground. And entrepreneur Lucius Sterling has created a trillion-dollar empire solving the world's problems: poverty, disease, war, and even death. But when a new technology attacks the fundamental building ...


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