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125

He didn't deviate from the book...much At least one Ring-Wraith does enter Bree in the night and is seen by Merry: "I have seen them Frodo! I have seen them! Black riders!...Here. In the village. I stayed indoors for an hour. Then as you did not come back, I went out for a stroll. I had come back again and was standing just outside the light of the ...


112

The Ringwraiths couldn't fly on their own or teleport. To get from point A (near Rivendell) to point B (Mordor) they had to travel every foot in between. In LotR, they walk, ride horseback and ride flying mounts. With their horses gone, their only option was to get new transport or walk back to Mordor -- a very long way! 'You cannot destroy Ringwraiths like ...


87

Jackson and Boyens felt that the medium of film (as opposed to Tolkien's fairly stodgy prose) allowed them a unique opportunity to create a scene that would heighten tension for a few minutes as well as giving audiences an ambiguous moment where they could ultimately learn that Strider/Aragorn was a good guy. Jackson: I liked this gag where we deliberately ...


74

It was the Witch-King who stabs Frodo. There were five tall figures: two standing on the lip of the dell, three advancing. In their white faces burned keen and merciless eyes; under their mantles were long grey robes; upon their grey hairs were helms of silver;... Two of the figures halted. The third was taller than the others: his hair was long and ...


67

Nazgûl is Black Speech and is translated as Ringwraiths or sometimes Ring-wraiths. Nazg means ring and gûl means wraith/spirit in the broadest of terms. gûl is a loan from the "Black Speech" and refers to evil and necromantic arts. Cf. Nazgûl (nazg-gûl). Parma Eldalamberon XVII, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of ...


64

The Witch-king is described as undead... In Return of the King, when Merry slashes at him (emphasis mine): So passed the sword of the Barrow-downs, work of Westernesse. But glad would he have been to know its fate who wrought it slowly long ago in the North-kingdom when the Dúnedain were young, and chief among their foes was the dread realm of Angmar and ...


60

It is common in folklore for evil or "unnatural" creatures to be unable to cross running water. For example, this is a traditional attribute of vampires: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vampire Tolkien himself noted that this idea was difficult to sustain for the Ringwraiths. In particular, they would have had to cross the river Greyflood (which had no bridge ...


56

First things first, the Shire (as "the Shire") likely didn't exist until four years after the Witch-king fled eastwards, when Bucca of the Marish became the first Thain. 1975 Arvedui drowned in the Bay of Forochel. The palantíri of Annúminas and Amon Sûl are lost. Eärnur brings a fleet to Lindon. The Witch-king defeated at the Battle of Fornost, ...


50

First off, the Necromancer of Dol Guldur, that you recall mentioned in "The Hobbit", was NOT the Witch King of Angmar, but his boss - Sauron himself. Second, just like ALL Nazgul, the Witch King was a human. They were all kings of old who were given the 9 Rings of Power, and succumbed to them. Tolkien Gateway has a very good article on the Witch-...


43

Tolkien comments on this briefly in Letter 210. The whole letter is worth a read, since he scathingly (and quite hilariously) rips into a script for a proposed film version, but I'll only quote the relevant section (bold is my emphasis, italic is Tolkien's): [The Black Riders'] peril is almost entirely due to the unreasoning fear which they inspire (like ...


42

In the book, it's because he'd only just arrived, on horseback, evidently having accompanied Grond (and some additional troops) to the battlefield. Over the hills of slain a hideous shape appeared: a horseman, tall, hooded, cloaked in black. Slowly, trampling the fallen, he rode forth, heeding no longer any dart. He halted and held up a long pale ...


41

Gandalf has this to say in the beginning of Book 2 of the Fellowship of the Ring, when he sits by the convalescent Frodo in Rivendell: If they had succeeded, you would have become like they are, only weaker and under their command. You would have became a wraith under the dominion of the Dark Lord; and he would have tormented you for trying to keep his ...


39

I'm reasonably sure the only person other than Frodo who Tolkien mentions being stabbed with a Morgul-blade is Boromir, a Steward of Gondor. The section of Appendix A to Lord of the Rings about the Stewards says: In the last years of Denethor I the race of uruks, black orcs of great strength, first appeared out of Mordor, and in 2475 they swept across ...


39

He didn't know or care about it. The Shire was a small entity within the realm of Arnor (or Arthedain), not politically or militarily powerful. We know that it and its inhabitants were very little known except by its nearest neighbours (the men of Bree, or the Rangers of the North) and a few of the Wise such as Gandalf who understood the virtue of humility. ...


37

Tolkien did not name the creature but based on different chapters of the books they were called by different names. The Fell beasts, hell-hawks, and Nazgûl-birds, were names used to describe the flying creatures on which the Nazgûl rode after being unhorsed at the Ford of Bruinen. http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/Fell_beasts When asked about the nature of ...


37

Saruman told Radagast. ’ ”I have an urgent errand,” he said. “My news is evil.” Then he looked about him, as if the hedges might have ears. “Nazgûl,” he whispered. “The Nine are abroad again. They have crossed the River secretly and are moving westward. They have taken the guise of riders in black.” ‘I knew then what I had dreaded without knowing it ’ “The ...


36

Book 1, ch.4: "A long-drawn wail came down the wind, like the cry of some evil and lonely crea­ture. It rose and fell, and ended on a high pierc­ing note. Even as they sat and stood, as if sud­denly frozen, it was an­swered by an­other cry, fainter and fur­ther off, but no less chill­ing to the blood." Book 1, ch.12: "...and from the Rid­...


35

Ulmo = "He Who Pours" (a.k.a Lord of Waters) controls even underground waters in Arda. Ulmo, second most powerful of the Valar, totally opposed Melkor's (and thus Sauron's) program of dominating the Creation. + The Ring Wraiths are as anti-creation as you can get. To cross into (as opposed to over) Ulmo's domain would unmake the Nine (cf. the crossing of ...


30

We must not forget that the idea of "power" in the Tolkienverse is not generally a physical one. In that, Tokien's beings have "powers" of fear, love, despair, hope and influence. As such, when comparing the beings' "power" levels, it is incorrect to think of it as fire "hurting" a Nazgul, but rather that fire does away with their advantage of stealth and ...


28

If you're ok with taking the movies' word for it, Gandalf clearly states that it was the Witch-king Gandalf: Sauron has yet to reveal his deadliest servant. The one who would lead Mordor's armies in war. The one they say no living man can kill: the Witch-King of Angmar. You've met him before. He stabbed Frodo on Weathertop.


27

It was the Witch-King (Probably) Two of the figures halted. The third was taller than the others: his hair was long and gleaming and on his helm was a crown. In one hand he held a long sword, and in the other a knife; both the knife and the hand that held it glowed with a pale light. He sprang forward and bore down on Frodo. At that moment Frodo threw ...


24

Despite no longer being in control of the One Ring, Sauron still maintained control over the Nazgûl through each of the Nine rings which he regained while still in control of the One. Letter #246 explains that even if someone else had control over the One Ring, the Nazgûl would still ultimately obey Sauron: Sauron sent at once the Ringwraiths. They were ...


22

I'm willing to be corrected on this, but I think the answer is "we don't know". The swords could have been made in Mordor, Minas Morgul, Dol Guldur, ... They might even be artifacts from the Nazgul's countries of origin. The only information I can recall about their weapons is that the blade the Witch King uses to stab Frodo is referred to as a "Morgul ...


21

The Nine have greater power the closer to Mordor they are, also they get stronger as the more Sauron grows in power (Sauron can even enhance them with some additional power like he did during battle of Pelennor Fields) like Gandalf in book says: The Ringwraiths are deadly enemies, but they are only shadows yet of the power and terror they would possess if ...


20

The carcass of one of these animals (the one ridden by the Witch-king of Angmar) is twice referred to as a "fell beast" in The Return of the King. Right before Theoden's death: But thereupon Éomer rode up in haste, and with him came the knights of the household that still lived and had now mastered their horses. They looked in wonder at the carcase of ...


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