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38

Replace the dragon with a toad, and you get "The Wee Free Men", the first of Pratchett's Tiffany Aching cycle. The protagonist is Tiffany Aching, a 9 year old girl who lives on a sheep farm. The sheep are not a major plot point, but a lot of Tiffany's life revolves around them. Thinking about the rest of Pratchett's works, I don't recall any books with a ...


14

The Voyage of the Space Beagle by A. E. Van Vogt. Wikipedia has an article on the novel here. This is a fixup novel made from four of Van Vogt's novellas. The alien that looks like a cat appears in the first story. He is a Coeurl, the last of his race, and he lives by extracting potassium from the creatures that he kills. The crew initially believe him to ...


14

Feet of Clay features: The Dragon King of Arms who is not a real dragon, but a vampire. He is also not a lawyer, but Ankh Morpork’s chief herald. However, he is as close as you can possibly get to the stereotypic evil lawyer without being a lawyer. He is the book’s antagonist. A sheep stampede and a Judas goat. They are partly used as an analogy to the ...


14

I think this might be "Spawn of the Death Machine" by Ted White (1968). The Goodreads description is a partial match: "You are an artificially constructed human being, a mobile data-gathering device." That is what the computer's metallic voice tells Tanner when it releases him from his cell. Naked, unarmed, with no memory to guide him, he emerges into ...


13

I wonder if this is Night Walk by Bob Shaw. It has the problems with hyperspace that you mention: In the first century of interstellar exploration Earth alone dispatched some forty million robot probes, of which less than two hundred chanced to make their way back. Of that number, exactly eight had found usable planetary systems. Not one of the handful ...


12

This is Heavy Weather (1994) by Bruce Sterling. The people in the bunker are a group of fixers employed by the rich, who find a zone of silence caused by massive damage to communications infrastructure in the wake of an "F6" tornado driven by the jet stream. They wear radio-controlled explosive collars to keep them under the thumb of their masters; once ...


10

This is Phoenix, by Richard Cowper. There's the suspended animation facility referred to in point 3, the Caves of Sleep. The bit at the end with the circle is what I remember most clearly, corresponding to point 13, and it's that which made me think it was the same book. Google Books doesn't have that scene, but the character names were familiar enough to ...


9

I think that’s probably City of Diamond by Doris Egan (who went on to be a TV producer on House rather then continuing her writing career). It was first published in 1996 under the pseudonym Jane Emerson. Adrian Mercati is thrown into the role of Protector of the City of Diamond, one of the Three Cities vast interstellar spaceships with whole ...


9

The Runaway Robot (1965), by Lester del Rey The cover on the left is an accurate portrayal of Rex the robot, the point-of-view character, according to Rex's description of himself: I have no nose or mouth, and only one eye, you might say -- the refractor bulb in the middle of my control box Early on, Rex muses about his sense of vision: [Paul] says ...


7

It sounds like Lempriere’s Dictionary, by Lawrence Norfolk, except that book is set in 18th Century London. The protagonist sets about writing a dictionary of mythology after his father is brutally killed by his neighbor’s hounds. In so doing he uncovers a conspiracy that cheated his family of wealth and leads to more deceit and murder. I hope that's the ...


6

That is The Last Dragonlord by Joanne Bertin. Published in 1998 with the sequel in 1999, the trilogy wasn't completed until 2012. Like you, though, I feel it was clearly stated to be 3 books. Dragonlord Linden Rathan, last-born of a race of immortal weredragons, has spent six hundred years alone, searching for his soultwin while his fellow Dragonlords ...


6

The Trilogy of Two (2015) by Juman Malouf? From Goodreads: Identical twins Sonja and Charlotte are musical prodigies with extraordinary powers. Born on All-Hallows-Eve, the girls could play music before they could walk. They were found one night by Tatty, the Tattooed Lady of the circus, in a pail on her doorstep with only a note and a heart-shaped ...


6

There are no concrete plans for book VI. It took the writer some considerable effort to get a contract for book V, and to actually write it once contracted. From his blog This was kind of a rough one, since there were delays getting the contract and approvals through, so I was late getting started and I had only three months to write the book. By his own ...


5

The Human Division was initially released as a set of 13 chapbooks. I assume he's talking about the covers for each of those chapbooks, which you can see in this gallery; they are all credited to John Harris. Here are the first 2 chapbook covers as an example of the artwork: It appears that prints of some of these may be available from the website of his ...


5

Posting a partially matching answer, "The Machine Stops" by E.M. Forster matches other than being too old (1909) and not mentioning "McCloo". The story describes a world in which most of the human population has lost the ability to live on the surface of the Earth. Each individual now lives in isolation below ground in a standard room, with all bodily and ...


5

Samantha Slade series by Susan Smith The blurb of the first book on Goodreads, Samantha Slade: Monster-Sitter is: Are those real fangs in Little Lupi's mouth? Samantha Slade isn't asking! For $6 an hour, she'd babysit for monsters! So what if Lupi's a little hairy and likes to growl at the full moon or if Drake consumes ketchup by the case and ...


4

Sounds more like "Star Rangers" A ship of the Star Rangers of the collapsing Galactic Empire flees from the ships of one of the fleets forming out of the remains of the empire's fleet. The Star Rangers are still loyal to the Empire and Central Control, but hated and hunted by the troops of the new empires. The ship leaves the normal flight paths to escape,...


4

You're looking for Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge. In an alternative version of 18th-century England, Mandelion is ruled in name by a mad Duke, in reality by a group of competing Guilds, and in aspiration by a variety of royal pretenders. Since the Realm was shattered, the king deposed, and the parliamentarians and monarchists locked in struggle, with ...


4

The Demonata by Darren Shan? Started in 2005, ten books total. The cover of the first book (Lord Loss, 2005) has a werewolf: TVTropes has a character matching your recollection of a guy making portals out of coloured shapes only he can see: Blessed with Suck: Kernel has always been able to see patches of light floating around, and can use them to create ...


4

This is probably the Time Riders series by Alex Scarrow. There were three young people, and their headquarters, which kept cycling through a two-day period, was under a bridge in New York City. The second book was about dinosaurs, and the third did have a segment in Sherwood Forest. The 'bodyguard clone's name was Bob and the female version was called Becks. ...


3

This might be The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick. It's the novel on which the 2011 film Hugo was based. A boy, son of a clockmaker, has to live with his alcoholic uncle after his father dies in a fire at the museum where he works, and is forced to maintain the clocks in the huge train station. Eventually, he uses his father's journal to repair ...


3

Could it be 'The Programmed Man' by Jeff & Jean Sutton? https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/The_Programmed_Man.html?id=36KySgAACAAJ&redir_esc=y The reported power of the N-bomb aboard a destroyer spaceship preserves peace for years in the federated solar systems until enemy teleports--agents with the mental power to transport themselves--...


3

Per the thread cited by Valorum above in a comment, this story was identified as Waters of Death (1967) by Irving A. Greenfield. An online review notes some of the same details as mentioned by the OP: There isn’t even any regret on Wilde’s part when his wife announces she’s to become a government whore of sorts at the local “sex center”... and ......


2

Book was A Double Shadow, by Frederick Turner, published 1978


2

Andre Norton's Galactic Derelict comes to mind: There's societal breakdown on the scale of a galactic civilisation. The protagonists arrive on an alien world covered by a vast, ruined, city in a somewhat stolen space craft. The main protagonists are human but the main other species they interact with are somewhat reptilian. It was first published in 1959. ...


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