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5

This is The Seeking Sword, by Jaan Kangilaski (1977). I no longer have a copy, but I reread it more than once and remember the plot. The protagonist is a contemporary man who becomes fascinated by a crude, ancient sword that is inhabited by the spirit of a prehistoric shaman. The shaman made the sword from meteoritic iron and entered it in order to defend ...


7

Remember the "warrior rat" Moties? The planet has an entire ecosystem with the various subtypes of Motie, and it goes through frequent cycles of population growth and collapse. They keep each other in check. The ship had no balancing species, so technical measures were necessary.


4

Could be Harry Turtledove's 'Gerin the Fox' books (possibly written as Eric Iverson). From Goodreads: When the barbarous Trokmoi killed his father and older brother, he became Baron of Fox Keep, warring against not only the Trokmoi and their fearsome evil wizard but also against the Empire of Elabon One review mentions a quest to the capital to ...


10

Acceleration causes significant force on the human body. This force is actually not something we can survive for long, although we've also not really had the chance to test the human body's reaction to long-term acceleration like that. Humans black out around 4-6 g if that acceleration has been acting for only a few seconds and the person is not in some ...


3

This reminds me a good bit of Henry Martyn by L. Neil Smith. The title character is taken by pirates, and eventually rises to lead them. It's a very far future, with "keflar" clothing, near-instant multi-material 3-D printing, gene-modified mercenary grunts, orbital tethers to land the sailing starships (complete with "cannon" that are prone to explode ...


5

To borrow my answer from Book involving race-preserved characters, futuristic society of "stans" (or "norms")?: Piers Anthony's Race Against Time as per my answers here and here. John Smith is just a typical teenager growing up in a typical American town...Or is he? He has a dog -- that can climb trees and understand very complex ...


51

This is almost certainly the first short story in Frank Herbert's book "The Godmakers" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Godmakers_(novel) In the first story, "You Take the High Road" - the protagonist, Lewis Orne, is the agent. The mentor notes that the suspect culture has the following: Straight broad roads good only for transporting troops across high ...


18

I think this is Frank Herbert The God Makers. It's made up of 4 short stories the first of which matches your description. The book has a Wikipedia page here


49

It's SF, not fantasy, but monks that do math, alternate "dimensions" (inter-universal travel) and multiple zones sounds a lot like Anathem (2008) by Neal Stephenson. It's definitely a tome; the trade and paperback editions ran over 1000 pages. The story is set on Arbre where monastery-like places called "concents" are where the thinkers are cloistered. ...


8

There's a bit of that happening in Greg Egan's novel Schild's Ladder, but it's only a very minor aspect of the story, not an essential plot element. In this hard sci-fi novel, set many centuries in the future, human culture has spread over a large portion of the galaxy. There is no FTL travel. Most interstellar travel is done by transmitting people's ...


10

I think you've definitely got at least three stories confused over the years. Apologies for partial answer I can't identify the mirror story but I keep thinking Andre Norton. The children who shuffle but can fly are characters in 'Pottage' (1955), a short story by Zenna Henderson, she had many short stories about The People - extraterrestrials who settled ...


2

Could this be David Brin's The Giving Plague (1987)? Not all villains succeed at being evil. Not all diseases deserve the word plague. Fate can be ironic indeed. The chilling short story, The Giving Plague, follows microbiologist Forry, a self-proclaimed cynic, jealous of his “boy wonder” colleague who discovers a unique virus that could change humanity. ...


7

The Man Who Fell to Earth (1963) by Walter Tevis Thomas Jerome Newton is a humanoid alien who comes to Earth seeking to construct a spaceship to ferry others from his home planet, Anthea, to Earth. Anthea is experiencing a terrible drought after many nuclear wars, and the population has dwindled to less than 300. Their own starships are unusable for lack ...


6

This is "Radix" by A.A. Attanasio, 1981. From its wikipedia page: Radix is the story of a young man's odyssey of self-discovery, from dangerous adolescent to warrior, from outcast to near-god, in a far-future Earth dramatically changed from the one we know. The hero is described as you remember: Sumner Kagan: The novel's hero, an overweight rebellious ...


5

I found it. At long last, I found it. I have to say, it was tricky. I tried over and over again every variation of the details I knew (or thought I knew) in google and every book search website I could find. Then, under advice from a New York Public Library article, I did a very specific search in Reddit. Empset themselves had been looking for the book I was ...


11

If you are missremembering it a bit, you could be thinking of Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality. From Godric Griffindor's short autobiography is the following quote: Non est salvatori salvator, neque defensori dominus, nec pater nec mater, nihil supernum. - Godric Gryffindor, 1202 C.E. Translated to: No rescuer hath the ...


2

Antarktos Rising by Jeremy Robinson (2011) This book has almost all the things you have listed: Frozen USA though from crustal displacement instead of magnetic reversal, thawing Antarctica with return of Biblical giants, main character is a young lady (Mirabelle Whitney), the other people teams from various nations on a race to claim the continent, and ...


2

I've found a better match in The Masters of Solitude by Marvin Kaye and Parke Godwin. In the millennium after a global war, society in the former United States has splintered into groups. The main group in the story, the Coven, live in a pre-industrial Native American lifestyle, but one of growing population and power. Many members have mild telepathic ...


2

Is it possible you're referred to E.E. Smith's The Galaxy Primes? The ship was called the Pleiades, and it was Earth’s first starship. It could travel instantaneously to literally anywhere in the universe – but that was just the trouble with it. For there was absolutely no way of predicting where in the infinities of space it would reappear when it winked ...


3

An alternative answer, if the timeline is correct but some of the other details may not be, is Spare Parts (1999) by Sally Rogers-Davidson. Kelty, the protagonist, doesn't suffer an accident herself but her best friend does. ‘But they can fix you up,’ she assured her friend. ‘It’s amazing what they’re doing with bionics and plastic surgery and stuff.’ ...


4

The timeline is slightly off, as this came out in 2008, and a few of the details are also different, but is there any chance this could be Skinned (aka Frozen) from Robin Wasserman's Cold Awakening trilogy? Lia knows she should be grateful she didn't die in the accident. The Download saved her--but it also changed her, forever. She can deal with being a ...


18

I think this might be the Kerrion Space trilogy by Janet E. Morris. I can't be certain about this because I only have the third book in the series Earth Dreams. But in that book there is a drive that works exactly as you describe. Indeed it's actually called the spongespace drive. The Kerrion family are the absurdly rich dynasty that control access to the ...


1

Just to put the answer out there, after I suggested that it sounded like a Christopher Pike novel (him having written several books involving people being possessed by members of an ancient race), the querent stated that they believe it is Spooksville #15: Revenge of the No-Ones. Mysterious balls of light are circling Spooksville, and one of them zaps ...


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