71

How did Ron open the Chamber of Secrets? This is explained in the book, although not very well: Ron uses a heretofore-unknown talent for mimicry to exactly duplicate the sounds Harry made earlier in their adventure. From chapter 31, "The Battle of Hogwarts": "But how did you get in [the Chamber of Secrets]?" [Harry] asked, staring from the [Basilisk] ...


46

First, it's not definite that Snape told Draco to use Serpensortia. All that we know is that he said quietly something to Draco before the duel. Snape moved closer to Malfoy, bent down, and whispered something in his ear. Malfoy smirked, too. It could have been something as simple as "hit him hard and fast. Keep him on his back feet" or "50 points to ...


42

There's no canon proof either way. Even if they aren't, there’d be ways around it. They’d know that the looking into the eyes of the basilisk can kill, so they'd be careful not to. Most of the basilisk victims were probably caught off guard by the presence of a basilisk. The Parselmouth controlling it would both know of its existence, and that its stare is ...


38

No, Harry loses the ability to speak Parseltongue once Voldemort is dead: Nigel: Can Harry speak Parseltongue when he is no longer a Horcrux? J.K. Rowling: No, he loses the ability, and is very glad to do so. J.K. ROWLING WEBCHAT - 07.30.07 - THE LEAKY CAULDRON This quote from J.K. Rowling doesn't indicate that Harry retains any knowledge of ...


34

It's incredibly useful, especially in warfighting: Due to its rarity, it's a useful battle language (think Navajo). For example, Gaunts communicated with each other in Parseltongue and nobody save Harry and Dumbledore could tell what they were saying. Snakes are a great weapon: humans are naturally afraid of them, and many species are quite dangerous (...


33

Yes, Herpo the Foul is a Parselmouth who pre-dates Slytherin. From Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (emphasis mine): The first recorded Basilisk was bred by Herpo the Foul, a Greek Dark wizard and Parselmouth, who discovered after much experimentation that a chicken egg hatched beneath a toad would produce a gigantic serpent of extraordinarily ...


32

Harry was never an official Horcrux, according to J.K. Rowling. And, yes, once the fragment of Voldemort's soul that Harry contained was destroyed by Voldemort, Harry lost the ability to speak Parseltongue. I'm not sure what other powers you're referring to, but JKR has stated that Harry did lose the ability to speak and understand Parseltongue. Nigel: ...


23

The wizarding community is a small pool, and Parseltongue is a rarely-used skill. If Slytherin's descendents were marrying into the general community, then you would expect them to grow in number over the last thousand years. But that may not be the case; remember that: Slytherin's last known descendants are the Gaunt family. When Dumbledore introduces ...


19

It’s not really clear from the information we have. There’s no example of a very young child just learning to speak English speaking Parseltongue - everyone we see speaking it is already old enough to have already learned English. Harry (although his ability to speak Parseltongue was not truly his) was able to speak Parseltongue by the age of ten. “As ...


16

No, in an interview, J.K. Rowling confirms that Dumbledore understands Parseltongue (Parseltongue is the language; a Parselmouth is someone who speaks Parseltongue). There is no canon confirmation that Dumbledore is a Parselmouth or that he speaks Parseltongue. We only know that he understands it. He also understands Mermish and Gobbledygook (Goblin language)...


11

Other than Herpo the Foul and Paracelsus (who could themselves have been ancestors/descendants of Slytherin), all known Parselmouths are indeed direct descendants of Slytherin. We also know that by the time of the HP series, Voldemort is the last surviving descendant of Slytherin. So we don't need to mess around talking about eldest sons: even if all ...


10

According to the Famous Wizard Cards seen in the video game "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets", Paracelsus (1493-1541) is... "Credited with discovering Parseltongue" Obviously this conflicts heavily with later canon mentions of Salazar Slytherin and Herpo the Foul but it is worth noting that JKR did write the cards seen in the EA games, even if ...


9

He was not the only one who knew of the Chamber... It is true that the Chamber was not easy to find, and that Riddle, an extraordinary individual, had difficulty finding it: It had taken me five whole years to find out everything I could about the Chamber of Secrets and discover the secret entrance...as though Hagrid had the brains, or the power! ...


9

Couldn't it simply be that the portion of soul imbued in the diary horcrux was greater than the portion that was in Harry? The Harry horcrux was created last. If yes, then it might be a simple diary horcrux has the larger claim to command when compared to Harry. If I recall correctly the diary was one of his earliest horcruxes. So it may have the ...


8

Well, I suppose it depends on your locale. It'd be pretty useless in Iceland and Ireland, but more useful in Australia. In the UK, most snakes are pretty harmless. But really, Parseltongue is pretty useless in general. Assuming that one comes across a snake in the wild, there is no lack of spells that would allow the wizard to take control of it, destroy it,...


8

According to JK Rowling, he lost that ability. This is mentioned in the following link: http://www.accio-quote.org/articles/2007/0730-bloomsbury-chat.html


8

It can be very useful indeed, but situational. Parseltongue is one of those character traits that can be very useful if you design your character around it and make sure you get into situations where you're useful. It is not useful if you want a character that just hits everything in melee with brute force without having to think about tactics or ...


6

The creation of Basilisks has been illegal since medieval times, although the practice is easily concealed by simply removing the chicken egg from beneath the toad when the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures comes to call. However, since Basilisks are uncontrollable except by Parselmouths, they are as dangerous to most Dark ...


6

Probably not, but it may be possible. J.K. Rowling says in an interview that the natural ability to speak Parseltongue is passed down through the Slytherin bloodline, and that she doesn’t think Ron would be able to speak it properly. However, she implies that one of the reasons that people don’t typically learn Parseltongue is that it’d be hard for them to ...


5

YES. Strictly speaking, if we were addressing the title's question Would Harry still be a Parselmouth at the end of the Deathly Hallows? The answer is yes, because to be able to speak Parseltongue doesn't imply to be able to say new words - as long as you can say/remember some it is fine - and Ron proved it. What Harry can't do anymore is say new words ...


5

Harry might have been able to control the basilisk - he never tried. Harry heard the basilisk in the pipes - but he never tried to speak to it, either when he heard it or when he was in the Chamber of Secrets with Tom Riddle. (In the movie, he started to try, then Tom told him “Parseltongue won’t save you now” and he stopped before really attempting to ...


4

It has been useful to: Open locks intended to be openned only by those of your bloodline (who are more likely inheret your skill) Tell magically summoned snakes not to murder your classmates Tell snakes to kill those who can be killed by snakes Listen to snakes to learn what they might observe that you didn't/cannot Hear giant magic snakes looking for lunch ...


4

In the second novel, Lockheart's foolery demolished the main tunnel to the Chamber, making it impossible to access or leave. Harry escaped the chamber, so clearly this is not the case. the fact that the teeth are still there also implies that the Chamber wasn't excavated and the rubble cleared in the interval. Clearly it was in order to get Harry out, ...


4

Phillipus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim (Paracelsus) is known for the discovery of Parseltongue in 16th Century. Mentioned in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Chocolate Frog Cards (here). Apart form Harry, the most well-known Parselmouth was Salazar Slytherin himself. Then came Voldemort and even Dumbledore. According to Pottermore ...


4

We don't know. There's only one Parselmouth mentioned in any level of canon that predates Salazar Slytherin and that's Herpo the Foul. There's no mention of whether they're related in any way, nor any mention of Salazar's other relatives.


4

Salazar was a Parselmouth, and his descendants inherited it. The natural ability to speak Parseltongue is an inherited trait. Salazar Slytherin was a Parselmouth, and his descendants tended to inherit it as their ancestor had it. “You can speak Parseltongue, Harry,’ said Dumbledore calmly, ‘because Lord Voldemort – who is the last remaining descendant of ...


3

No. Parseltongue is a language, though an inherent one, and as such cannot afford the speaker immunity against the Basilisk. Tom Riddle is a 'ghost' conjured up by the diary - notice that the diary is down in the chamber? This 'ghost' of Riddle cannot be anywhere that the diary isn't, which is why he couldn't get to Harry before he convinced Ginny to throw ...


3

Assume the gene for Parseltongue is dominant. From a genetic standpoint, it will only be passed down on average to half of Slytherin's descendants (other than those who get two copies of the gene through interbreeding). If the number of children per generation of Slytherin descendants averages about two, there would be no increase in the number of ...


2

This is something I have always pointed out to fellow fans, only to be shot down. I believe that Harry certainly had the power to control the basilisk, just as Ginny was able to while she was under Tom Riddle's influence. I think it simply comes down to the fact that this idea never occurs to him. It is important for readers to remember that Harry's ...


2

I cannot quite recall, but I am sure that Tom Riddle mentions that the Basilisk would not obey Harry. I would assume that the Basilisk would still recognize Harry as Slytherin's heir, but as Tom had commanded it before when he killed Myrtle and then again through the diary the Basilisk saw Tom as his rightful "master" (for want of a better word).


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