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113

Fawkes left After Dumbledore died, Fawkes's grief was apparent: Gulping, Madam Pomfrey pressed her fingers to her mouth, her eyes wide. Somewhere out in the darkness, a phoenix was singing in a way Harry had never heard before: a stricken lament of terrible beauty. And Harry felt, as he had felt about phoenix song before, that the music was ...


61

Fawkes left as JK Rowling's sign that something permanent had to leave the school when Dumbledore died. In her 2007 web chat with The Leaky Cauldron, she said: "Something had to leave the school for good when Dumbledore died, and I decided that would be Fawkes. Dumbledore was a very great and irreplaceable man, and the loss of Fawkes (and the fact ...


37

The phoenix would be, but the Horcrux would not There doesn't seem to be any reason a phoenix couldn't be made into a Horcrux. We have precedent. We know Horcruxes can be made from living creatures, because Nagini was made into a Horcrux. “I don't think so,” said Dumbledore. “I think I know what the sixth Horcrux is. I wonder what you will say when I ...


36

He most probably returned to the wild from whence he came. While Phoenixes do make "very faithful pets", Fascinating creatures, phoenixes. They can carry immensely heavy loads, their tears have healing powers, and they make highly faithful pets. (Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets - Chapter 12 - text available on Pottermore) their loyalty is ...


35

We probably don't see more because they are not native to Great Britain. It nests on mountain peaks and is found in Egypt, India, and China. Since the story is from Harry's POV and he has never been to those places, it seems reasonable the only one we see is Fawkes. Keep in mind as well they are very hard to domesticate The phoenix gains a XXXX rating not ...


26

No. Some evidence for other phoenixes: In Quidditch Through the Ages, there’s mention of a Quidditch team with a phoenix as their mascot: Antipodean teams have always thrilled European crowds with their speed and showmanship. Among the best are the Moutohora Macaws (New Zealand), with their famous red, yellow, and blue robes, and their phoenix mascot ...


22

We know that in book 2 Chamber of Secrets, during the school year Harry visits Dumbledore's office and witnesses Fawkes's burning day, later in the same school year Fawkes is already full grown and saves Harry from the Basilisk's venom in the Chamber. So while we don't know exactly whether its a mater of days or weeks we know for certainty that at maximum ...


20

Fawkes Left As he lay there, he became aware suddenly that the grounds were silent. Fawkes had stopped singing. And he knew, without knowing how he knew it, that the phoenix had gone, had left Hogwarts for good, just as Dumbledore had left the school, had left the world ... had left Harry. -The Phoenix Lament, Half-Blood Prince. After ...


15

There is no canon answer. You may be interested in some of the theories discussed in this Reddit thread. In particular, this comment is quite telling: I read a fanfic where fawkes came to him before his battle with Grindelwald, in response to his feelings about having to face his old friend, and it's the only reason he won. The fact that fanfics have ...


14

‘Fawkes is a phoenix, Harry. Phoenixes burst into flame when it is time for them to die and are reborn from the ashes. Watch him ...’ Harry looked down in time to see a tiny, wrinkled, new-born bird poke its head out of the ashes. It was quite as ugly as the old one. Here we seem Fawkes emerges from a pile of ashes, but Fawkes swooped down in ...


14

According to Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them, the phoenix lives an inordinately long life, but it is not immortal: The phoenix lives to an immense age as it can regenerate, bursting into flames when its body begins to fall and rising again from the ashes as a chick. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them - page 32 - Scholastic - An A-Z of ...


11

No. We know that Fawkes has only ever given two feathers to be used in a wand, which is why Ollivander thought Harry's wand was so special. But we also know that there are other wands made of phoenix feathers. As a consequence, there must be other phoenixes, even if we don't directly meet them.


10

Destroying a horcrux is destroying it "beyond magical repair." Phoenixes are magical creatures. Destroying the phoenix, beyond magical repair, would be destroying the creature in its entirety. A phoenix also dies by self igniting at its old age, and is reborn anew. However, as we saw when Neville slayed Nagini. He destroyed her with Gryffindor's sword,...


6

It seems clear from the Harry Potter books and films that animals (or at least certain animals) have souls and can become ghosts. Members of the Headless hunt, for example ride on ghostly horses: Through the dungeon wall burst a dozen ghost horses, each ridden by a headless horseman. The assembly clapped wildly; Harry started to clap too, but stopped ...


5

It may be that Fawkes never looked the basilisk directly in the eye. Many birds have eyes on the sides of their heads which give them nearly 360 degrees of vision without actually focusing on something in particular like humans or even snakes do. Everybody else who looked at the basilisk did stare directly at it and make eye-contact so this could be where ...


4

There is a reason why not much people has Phoenix as pets. Phoenixes can just escape from any cage. Even if Voldemort was able to catch one, it would just disappear in a blink of an eye. Only way for Voldemort to catch a phoenix would be to use Killing curse on a phoenix unaware and take it when it is a newborn chick. But again, they will grow in days and ...


4

As rand al-thor has pointed out, there is no clear canonical evidence explaining when Dumbledore tamed Fawkes or his methodology. In Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: Volume 1 (2001), the august authority Newt Scamander merely states that they are immensely difficult to domesticate, without elaborating on why this may be. Nevertheless, there are a ...


3

Unknown J.K. Rowling has only once spoken about Fawkes past Peter Humphreys for BBC Newsround - Who did Fawkes previously belong to and will he play a vital role in the next book? JK Rowling: I am not going to answer about the role in the next books, which probably gives you a big clue, and he has never been owned by anyone but Dumbledore. You will notice ...


3

This started out as a comment, but became too long... Short answer- The phoenix would not let you turn it into a horcrux. I don't have any in-universe quotations or whatnot to support this, but I have the gut feeling that forcing horcrux status on something as powerful as a phoenix against its will would be impossible. Even supposing it had no say in the ...


3

In the end of Chamber of Secrets, when Fawkes heals Harry with tears , Tom Riddle says: look even your pet is crying for you. And then after Harry gets healed Tom says: I forgot that phoenixes could heal with their tears. Voldemort forgot that Phoenixes could heal so he did not search for them. He remembers their ability to heal at the end of the ...


2

To my knowledge, it has never been specifically mentioned. However, careful inspection of the books suggests a very quick maturity period. Keep in mind that Fawkes is a bird, albeit magical. Birds are altricial or precocial, or even a bit of both. Based on the following passages, I would think that Fawkes is the altricial type bird: Fawkes swooped down ...


2

As Adamant pointed out we learned in "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" that living creatures can be turned into Horcruxes. The Argument against it was: A phoenix could probably be a Horcrux. However, given that the Horcrux would be rendered useless when the phoenix regenerated, and that a phoenix wouldn't be likely to want to be a Horcrux ...


1

Not a lot about Fawkes origin in known. A reasonable estimate of his age is provided at link. It is stated that he was born on or prior to 1938, and aged at least 79 years.


1

Since I was not aware this was a duplicate, I would suggest reading Slytherincess' answer as it supports both the first and the second guess. I think, that one of the most interesting part is about Fawkes being able not just withstand a hit by Avada Kedavra, but to actually swallow it, shame I did not recall this occasion. Fawkes closed his eyes I did not ...


1

The Phoenix would be truly dead. Reading through J.K. Rowling's statements on the veil, one sentence that stuck out to me was this: It's the divide between life and death. I tried to do a nod to that in the Tale of Three Brothers - she was separate from them as though through a veil. You can't go back if you pass through that veil, you cannot come back. ...


1

It is not the gaze of the basilisk that kills, but eye contact. Fawkes could have clawed out the eyes of the serpent without looking at those eyes, thus avoiding death. The HP wiki also says that phoenixes are immune to the basilisk stare, but there is no direct source on it so take that as you will.


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