Hot answers tagged

71

The Simple Answer: Captain America does not throw his shield and have it return like a boomerang. It acts instead more like a frisbee disk able to strike and transfer energy between multiple opponents. As to whether the laws of physics would allow this to take place in reality is highly unlikely. There are no known substances which would allow a metal to do ...


69

The very short answer is that the acceleration from the ship's engines is likely to be quite small. Note that this is an ionic drive that accelerates continually rather than a rocket that expends all of its fuel in a g-force inducing blaze of glory. [On Computer Screen] Failing systems: Life support. Fusion reactor. Ionic Drive Assuming that the ship ...


58

Short answer: They don't really "turn 90 degrees". Or rather, they probably weren't supposed to. In the fourth draft (the one just prior to filming) of the script, Lucas gives us a hint about how he envisioned the Proton Torpedoes working: DODONNA Your approach will not be easy. You must ...


55

Sheldon's wrong and Leonard is right (Superman matches her speed). Lois was not two feet above the ground. Superman catches her about half way (approximately) down the building and he slows to a stop then proceeds. So he was matching her speed and slowing so she didn't get hurt. He does the same thing when the helicopter ...


52

We are hurtling through space at an insane speed at this moment (30 kilometers per second riding on the back of the earth); did you notice it? No, because you can't feel speed, you can only feel acceleration. "The wind in your face" makes you think you can feel speed, as do the bumps in the road but that's not the speed itself. Again, think of travelling ...


45

Answered here on Skeptics Gold melts at 1064 °C, however, in jewellery, gold is often alloyed with copper (wiki). Though copper melts at 1084 °C, the alloy has a lower melting point, as you can see from the phase diagram (note that the temperature is in Kelvin, which adds ~271): If the crown is 18k gold (¾ gold, ¼ copper), which makes an alloy ...


37

Nearby stars are shining on the ships from off screen in addition to the ship's built-in lighting. From the Star Trek: Voyager episode The Void: USS Voyager is sucked into an area of space that is devoid of stars, planets or any other form of energy. Because this place is devoid of stars, planets, and other forms of energy, there are no light sources ...


32

Starships have plenty of lights on them. Your question ignores the fact that starships have their own lights on the exteriors of their hulls. In the images above and below (from The Motion Picture) you can see quite the contrast between dark and lit-up parts of the hull. I would say that these images also answer your question of "How would a ship look to ...


30

Yes. See http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Lightsaber#Mechanics_and_specifications Summary: A diatium power cell generates the energy which passes through a series of focusing lenses and energizers before being converted into plasma. Focusing crystals project the plasma. Some widgets made the beam coherent. Plasma was reflected back by blade containment field....


25

Because his shield is made of a fictitious alloy, it doesn't need to obey the laws of physics. From the Wikipedia article: The vibranium in the shield grants it unusual properties, allowing it to absorb virtually all of the kinetic impact from any blows that the shield receives without injuring Rogers in the process. The vibranium is also a factor in the ...


24

I will confine my answer to Star Wars, as you are using that tag, and the question would be too broad if applied to Science Fiction at large. Ships in Star Wars are not firing actual lasers, they are firing blasters: Lucasfilm defines the blaster as "ranged energized particle weaponry". This indicates that a blaster is emitting physical matter. Turning ...


23

The canon novel Lords of the Sith makes explicit the fact that characters in-universe cannot hear explosions in the vacuum of space. For example, on page 16: [Vader's] interceptor streaked toward the gun bubble, aimed directly at it. Content with the trajectory, he unstrapped himself, overrode the interceptor’s safeties, threw open the cockpit hatch, and ...


22

There are sounds when Captain America's shield is struck due to the metallurgical construction used in the manufacture of the shield. Since the shield is not composed of pure Wakandan vibranium, the energy and vibration dampening power is lessened. The answer lies in the materials used to make up the shield. Captain America's shield is not composed ...


22

The Flash's powers have evolved since the character's first appearance in 1940. While they were supposedly scientifically-based, little effort was made to explain any Flash's powers until the late sixties or early seventies re-creation of Barry Allen as the Silver Age Flash. Jay Garrick who was once called the Golden Age or Earth-2 Flash, gained his powers ...


22

The only story I've ever read that matches this description is Redshift Rendezvous by John E. Stith. The ship achieves 'faster than light' travel in our universe by shifting into a 'hyperspace' where the speed of light is only 10MPH, and things are much closer together. There are several subplots intertwined in the story, but in all cases, the odd physics ...


21

Speculation In the trivia notes for the Axiom Pixar Wiki it says: When WALL-E first sees the Axiom, it is located behind the Horsehead Nebula. A large Nebula which is starting to form star clusters would have gravity. It is possible the artifical gravity in the Axiom has adjusted itself to deal with the nearby nebula. So when the Pilot yanks the wheel ...


21

Khal Drogo's melting of gold in what appears to be a simple cookpot, without the application of some sort of magic or a carefully stoked furnace, the melting should not have happened at all. Pure gold is simply too tough to melt with an ordinary fire. Pure gold has a melting point of 1945 degrees Fahrenheit. The average cooking fire even with good coals ...


19

Modern rechargeable batteries have impressive lifespans often being able to be recharged thousands of times before wearing out. Assuming the curve of modern improvement of technology we can expect Wall-E to be the beneficiary of a technology capable of being recharged tens of thousands of times, improving both the efficiency and the capacity to be recharged. ...


18

The melting temperature of Gold is 1064.18 °C. According to wikipedia flame temperatures as: Wood 1027 °C, Charcoal fire 750–1,200 °C So it doesn't seem unreasonable that a pot on a coal fire could melt a Gold alloy. Note that we don't know the O2 concentration or atmospheric pressure in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire, and so these flame temperatures ...


18

TL;DR - It doesn't. The basic idea for the way that the Ant-Man suit works out of universe is a bastardisation of the Sqaure-Cube Law, which is the idea that as a shape grows in size, its volume and mass grows quicker and as such bones and muscles have to be exponentially stronger (and therefore larger and heavier) in order to survive the significantly ...


18

An out-of-universe answer would be that the people watching the show need to be able to see the ship that the Enterprise has encountered. As for in-universe: the view screen could probably create a image of the ship they have come across from the sensor information.


17

No. There is no known physical technology currently capable of suppressing an electromagnetic field across the entire planet without suppressing the planet's protective magnetosphere. The operative word in this case is KNOWN technologies or electromagnetic phenomena. Revolution Earth presupposes all forms of stored energy are impossible. Mechanical energy ...


17

Short Answers: Cinematic Iron Man has been show to have the ability to fly about 15,000 miles and engage in combat against standard non-superpowered enemies for about an hour without appreciable issues. Given he was seen flying alongside jet aircraft, he can achieve at least Mach 2 and sustain it. Unfortunately, this would make a trip from Miami to ...


17

It's not very plausible, really. The orbits of the various satellites we have up there are very different. If a satellite were to explode, it would not change its orbit much, so it wouldn't be much of a danger to the other satellites. I remember reading an article after I saw the movie, it's quite interesting. Here it is. Anyway, I'll quote what's ...


17

The Star Trek TNG Technical Manual (considered a canon source of info about the Star Trek Universe) contains a wealth of Treknobabble explanation regarding the presence of gravity aboard ship. In short, the technology is very similar to that of the Tractor beam; a small device buried below the deck plating emits gravitons which then attract anything ...


17

Mostly not We know that many ships in the Star Wars universe use repulsors for vertical flight. Ordinary ships use them to hover: A low, throbbing whine from above directed our eyes to the sky, where we saw the black flying-toast ship descend on its repulsors and hover perhaps four meters above the center of the lagoon, water rippling underneath ...


16

Mass is universal; it's weight that differs according to planet. The kilogram is a unit of mass, which is a physical property of objects. Something of mass 10 kg will have mass 10 kg anywhere: on Earth, on Mars, or floating weightless in space. Weight, on the other hand, is a force, also known as gravity. An object's weight, when it's on a certain planet, ...


15

No. If his shield were 100% effective at such things, it couldn't do ANY of what we see it do. Also, as you point out, if it could do such things, it would be covered by a layer of ice. It isn't. Of course, if plot required 0K temperature for some reason, Iron Man and Cap would work out a way to use the shield to do it. Once.


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